Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and expectations

Hello, and welcome to the forums at the Nautilus Drydocks, formerly Sub-driver.com!

We welcome anyone with a passion for submarines and a desire to learn and share knowledge about this fascinating hobby. Use of these forums indicates your intention to abide by our code of conduct:


1. No spam. All automated messages, advertisements, and links to competitor websites will be deleted immediately.

2. Please post in relevant sub-forums only. Messages posted in the wrong topic area will be removed and placed in the correct sub-forum by moderators.

3. Respect other users. No flaming or abusing fellow forum members. Users who continue to post inflammatory, abusive comments will be deleted from the forum after or without a warning.

4. No threats or harassment of other users will be tolerated. Any instance of threatening or harassing behavior is grounds for deletion from the forums.

5. No profanity or pornography is allowed. Posts containing adult material will be deleted.

6. No re-posting of copyrighted materials or other illegal content is allowed. Any posts containing illegal content or copyrighted materials will be deleted.
See more
See less

today's work

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by MFR1964 View Post
    David, question, so, running the motor in the wet, that will be no problem, but running your gears in the wet, are they contained inside a closure?, enlighten me!!

    Manfred.
    Good point, Manfred. You're alluding to the 'water-hammer' effect; the rapid squeezing of an incompressible fluid (water) between the teeth of the water immersed gears and the great lateral force it presents to the bearings that support the gears through their shafts. That hazard is real and is mitigated by a less than optimal meshing of the gears. In other words, I space the gears far enough apart to permit the water to squish out from the teeth without too much water-hammer occurring, but not so fare as to risk slippage and damaged gear teeth.

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • MFR1964
    replied
    David, question, so, running the motor in the wet, that will be no problem, but running your gears in the wet, are they contained inside a closure?, enlighten me!!

    Manfred.

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied



















    Leave a comment:


  • HardRock
    replied
    Merry Christmas Mate. I'm out of hospital for the holidays, just in time for a bush fire! Hurrah! I hope that you both have a wonderful - and restful Christmas. Onward!

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
    Merry Christmas Mr. & Mrs. Merriman.
    Same.

    David & Ellie

    Leave a comment:


  • redboat219
    replied
    Merry Christmas Mr. & Mrs. Merriman.

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by Davidh View Post
    Hello David,

    Thanks for your prompt response.

    I should have put two and two together earlier, I had seen your silicon mould with all the pushrod inserts before Duh!....

    I do have another question. I have always found it information overload with websites when looking up the "Cup seal". I have heard them called "lip seals" and even "Y' seals and the German name "Simmering" I know what I am looking for but find there are so many seals that look the same, some for Hydraulic and other applications I have been lost on websites trying to find stuff only to find that maybe the name I have been assuming they were called was wrong.

    Anyway, to cut to the chase. Do you get your Cup seals from Mc- Master Carr as well?. I looked over their web page and couldn't find anything. IF i may ask what are the spec for yours?

    Sorry,

    Pain in the ass from Oz.
    David H
    You are not a pain in the ass! You are my student. You are my attentive and participating student. I very much enjoy passing on to guys like you what others have taught me.

    Lip/cup/wiper seals are all unsupported rubber units. Simmering type seals feature an imbedded tensioner that forces the lip of the seal up tight against the rotating shaft -- ideal with WTC's that see great pressure differentials between their interior and the water around them, which is the case with ballast sub-systems of the 'piston' type.

    Here's where I get mine, David: Precision Associates, Inc.; 3800 Washington Avenue North; Minneapolis, MN 55412 https://www.precisionassoc.com/ https://catalog.precisionassoc.com/c...tes-inc-u-cups

    And for Christ's Sake!!! Improve your scribing techniques, will ya!????.... Still looks like crap!

    David
    The Horrible

    Leave a comment:


  • SubHuman
    replied
    I go into seals in detail in this video, including the source for cup seals along with part numbers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjuMFJOgMJU

    Leave a comment:


  • Davidh
    replied
    Hello David,

    Thanks for your prompt response.

    I should have put two and two together earlier, I had seen your silicon mould with all the pushrod inserts before Duh!....

    I do have another question. I have always found it information overload with websites when looking up the "Cup seal". I have heard them called "lip seals" and even "Y' seals and the German name "Simmering" I know what I am looking for but find there are so many seals that look the same, some for Hydraulic and other applications I have been lost on websites trying to find stuff only to find that maybe the name I have been assuming they were called was wrong.

    Anyway, to cut to the chase. Do you get your Cup seals from Mc- Master Carr as well?. I looked over their web page and couldn't find anything. IF i may ask what are the spec for yours?

    Sorry,

    Pain in the ass from Oz.
    David H

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    This version of the motor-bulkhead puts the motor in the water. Suspended aft of the motor is a gear splitter which outputs two counter-rotation shafts from the single motor input. This is still in the mock-up stage where I check fit and non-interference of the parts. I have yet to add the radial flange.


















    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott T View Post
    Can the motor bracket be mounted on the shaft end to make those long mounting rods go away? Never mind I think the answer is the outer shell spins on this type of motor so it has to be mounted at the one end.
    You got it, Scott. the only stationary portion of the motor case is the 'base' where the three power cables enter the stator. That's the portion that has to be physically attached to the MB. I'm now working on a motor on the wet side of the MB -- much easier to mount as there are no stand-off studs involved. That work to be chronicled in tonight's picture-show.

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott T
    replied
    Can the motor bracket be mounted on the shaft end to make those long mounting rods go away? Never mind I think the answer is the outer shell spins on this type of motor so it has to be mounted at the one end.
    Last edited by Scott T; 12-23-2019, 08:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by trout View Post
    Does that motor have a 5mm shaft going to 3/16" shaft?
    Yes, the motor has a 5mm shaft. The shaft extension/adaptor in this case is 1/8", but I can make it any diameter I wish.

    Bob had a good idea that would save a lot of MSD internal space: mount the motor in the wet! I'm working up a motor-bulkhead (MB) master for that arrangement today. Film at Eleven!

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • trout
    replied
    Does that motor have a 5mm shaft going to 3/16" shaft?

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    I've completed most of the grunt-work on the masters of a motor bulkhead that will mount a brushless propulsion motor for one of our SubDriver r/c submarine systems. I use the raw masters to check fit and operation in mock-up form. Once everything is working as planned (best laid plans … and all that happy horse-****), I refine the finish of the masters and turn them into rubber tooling from which production items will be cast.



















    David

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X