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Hms holland 1 build

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  • redboat219
    replied
    Originally posted by rwtdiver
    Making some progress!



    The ballast tank and pump are installed! I have done some test runs, and the pump and tank fill and drain with no leaks. I do have a very small hole in the bottom of the tank so that I can drain all the water out of the system to allow it to dry out when not in use. The drain line is capped of course when the system is in use.

    Now I can move on to installing the servos, ESC, and the receiver to complete the WTC!

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat"
    Is your BT in the forward section of your wtc?

    Leave a comment:


  • redboat219
    replied
    Don't forget to install noise suppression caps on the pump motor. Atleast 1 across the terminals.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	My Motor Caps.jpg
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ID:	163191

    Leave a comment:


  • SubDude
    replied
    Getting closer for sure Rob. Keep that momentum going.

    Leave a comment:


  • redboat219
    replied
    Rob,
    You could try using a reversible brushed ESC iinstead of those servo activated micro switches specially f you're not going to use a blocking valve.

    Looking forward to the test video.
    Last edited by redboat219; 07-20-2022, 11:44 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • RCSubGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by rwtdiver

    Thank you Bob! I have the pump that I am going to use! I did send you an email with the specifications...

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat"

    I didn't get your email, Rob... Can you re-send and let me know which email you sent to?

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Victory
    replied
    Redboat219,

    Sometimes I do admire your imagination and creativity,but sorry I'm a big submarine enthusiast and I've made it very clear, breaking down the pros and cons of peristaltic pumps, so if you'd still like to use a peristaltic pump in your little submarine, go for it, if you feel it's reliable. It's true that there is no such thing as standardization in making submarines, everyone is entitled to use what they want, it's just that I prefer to accept and learn from those who have come before me and then get what I want from them and innovate. Those masters summed up their experience through years of practice is well worth for those of us who come after them to learn, if you think I have a point, please think twice.

    If you still want to discuss about peristaltic pumps, please make a new thread and I will be happy to participate in the discussion, at the moment we are disrupting other people's threads.

    V
    Last edited by Sam Victory; 07-19-2022, 05:58 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • redboat219
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Victory View Post

    Redboat,

    Making things simple rather than complex is appropriate for most people on this forum. You replace other good stuff (gear pumps, diaphragm pumps...) with a peristaltic pump that is inherently unsuitable for submarines. , why is this? Do you call this challenging yourself or do you like to keep repairing things?

    V
    Sorry Rob, i apologize from hijacking your thread.

    Sam,
    why don't you ask these guys, they chose to use peristaltic pumps with their boats.

    https://forum.rc-sub.com/forum/build...lo-1-144-build

    https://forum.rc-sub.com/forum/build...144-conversion

    Leave a comment:


  • RCSubGuy
    replied
    Rob,


    Let me know if you're interested in that pump and I can take some measurements to see if it will fit in your WTC.

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • redboat219
    replied
    Originally posted by rwtdiver
    I just looked at a YouTube that Romel just put up!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDhsBM5Itj0

    It shows how the Blueback WTC has the water pump for his ballast system installed on the very front of the WTC. His entire WTC concept is very similar to what I am trying to do with the HMS Holland build.
    Very nice Blueback build, and it performed very well in the water. It was a great presentation and I really like how he took his time to show and explain his WTC and ballast system that he fabricated.

    This is the type of stuff that makes this hobby so enjoyable and positive, great building and most of all the GREAT people!

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat"
    At the time I posted the video Nate wasn't yet a member of this group. It was too good not to share here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Victory
    replied
    Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
    -That's why it's important you do pre and post mission checks.

    -You'll probably lose your sub to something else before the tube breaks.

    -Life is too short. Be a warrior not a worrier.
    Redboat,

    Making things simple rather than complex is appropriate for most people on this forum. You replace other good stuff (gear pumps, diaphragm pumps...) with a peristaltic pump that is inherently unsuitable for submarines. , why is this? Do you call this challenging yourself or do you like to keep repairing things? Peristaltic pumps are commonly used in the medical field, such as liquid transfer, titration, quantitative testing, etc., so it runs very slowly.

    V

    Leave a comment:


  • neitosub
    replied
    Thanks Rob! Yes, the ballast tank is 3D printed, I sprayed a few layers of automotive-grade filler primer on the inside and outside in order to seal the PLA against water and moisture. The ballast tank is actually too big and made the boat too negatively buoyant, so I had to squeeze in a lot of foam on the upper hull in order to get her sitting correctly at periscope depth.

    Nate

    Leave a comment:


  • neitosub
    replied
    Originally posted by rwtdiver
    I just looked at a YouTube that Romel just put up!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDhsBM5Itj0

    It shows how the Blueback WTC has the water pump for his ballast system installed on the very front of the WTC. His entire WTC concept is very similar to what I am trying to do with the HMS Holland build.
    Very nice Blueback build, and it performed very well in the water. It was a great presentation and I really like how he took his time to show and explain his WTC and ballast system that he fabricated.

    This is the type of stuff that makes this hobby so enjoyable and positive, great building and most of all the GREAT people!

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat"
    Thanks Rob! That’s actually my boat! I still have to take her out for her run this season, but that’s coming up soon!

    Nate




    Leave a comment:


  • redboat219
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Victory View Post
    To be honest, I don't really like using a peristaltic pump, even though it transports liquids in both directions. The reason is also very simple, in addition to it is very slow to transport liquid, there is a fatal disadvantage is its service life is particularly short, should be the shortest life of the pump. Peristaltic pump is dependent on the roller squeeze the tube to transport liquid, the longer the use of the effect will be worse because the tube will lose elasticity after too many times of squeeze, thus reducing the amount of liquid per unit of time. The most annoying thing is that you don't know when the hose will eventually rupture due to squeezing. Manufacturers have long done extensive experiments, the average life of an ordinary peristaltic pump is only four or five hours, in the case of non-stop operation. If one day, when you are operating the submarine process, peristaltic pump hose rupture, however, you have no idea, in the diving or surfacing process, peristaltic pump will let a constant stream of water come into the WTC dry space. The result is that a small amount of water accumulates and the eventual consequences are severe.


    V
    -That's why it's important you do pre and post mission checks.

    -You'll probably lose your sub to something else before the tube breaks.

    -Life is too short. Be a warrior not a worrier.

    Leave a comment:


  • neitosub
    replied
    Hi Rob,

    If inner space is the limiting factor, you can get away with having the pump on the exterior of the WTC, running in the wet. I have this setup in my Blueback and although it’s not ideal (the motor can get some slight corrosion on the brushes long term), it gets the job done since I don’t run that boat for long periods of time in the water anyways. As long as you dry the pump after every run, it should last you a while.

    Nate

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Victory
    replied
    To be honest, I don't really like using a peristaltic pump, even though it transports liquids in both directions. The reason is also very simple, in addition to it is very slow to transport liquid, there is a fatal disadvantage is its service life is particularly short, should be the shortest life of the pump. Peristaltic pump is dependent on the roller squeeze the tube to transport liquid, the longer the use of the effect will be worse because the tube will lose elasticity after too many times of squeeze, thus reducing the amount of liquid per unit of time. The most annoying thing is that you don't know when the hose will eventually rupture due to squeezing. Manufacturers have long done extensive experiments, the average life of an ordinary peristaltic pump is only four or five hours, in the case of non-stop operation. If one day, when you are operating the submarine process, peristaltic pump hose rupture, however, you have no idea, in the diving or surfacing process, peristaltic pump will let a constant stream of water come into the WTC dry space. The result is that a small amount of water accumulates and the eventual consequences are severe.


    V

    Leave a comment:

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