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  • Hello Mr. Merriman, I have sent you some information about Foxtrot and Sierra via "Wetransfer", please accept the file. It should be available in your mailbox.
    my email :2771424962@qq.com

    V
    Last edited by Sam Victory; 02-01-2022, 11:03 PM.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Sam Victory View Post
      Hello Mr. Merriman, I have sent you some information about Foxtrot and Sierra via "Wetransfer", please accept the file. It should be available in your mailbox.
      my email :2771424962@qq.com

      V
      Sam,

      I already have those FOXTROT drawings. But most of the SIERRA-2 info you sent is new to me and much appreciated. Thank you, sir.

      David
      Resident Luddite

      Comment


      • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

        Sam,

        I already have those FOXTROT drawings. But most of the SIERRA-2 info you sent is new to me and much appreciated. Thank you, sir.

        David
        My pleasure , sir ~ and here is another pic of Sierra II , a clear shot of its bow.

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        V

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        • Originally posted by Sam Victory View Post

          My pleasure , sir ~ and here is another pic of Sierra II , a clear shot of its bow.

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          V
          Now that's some scum line! Above the water lines looks like she just rolled off the assembly line!

          Rob
          "Firemen can stand the heat"

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            • Originally posted by Sam Victory View Post
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              More grist for the mill. Thank you.

              David
              Resident Luddite

              Comment


              • David,
                With regards to photo, is it correct to say that it would be wrong to paint the boat like what we see in the photo as the color denotes marine growth that has already died and bleached while the boat has been in drydock and not a boat in active service .

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                Last edited by redboat219; 02-02-2022, 10:48 PM.
                Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

                Comment


                • Please correct me if I'm wrong. The longer a submarine stays in dry dock, the more the marine life below the waterline will gradually die and will take on a mottled off-white color, you can look at the I-400 submarine at Pearl Harbor to be inspected and it is almost all white below the waterline. And the submarines in service, where the marine life below the waterline is not dead, perhaps the dark brown color better reflects the mottled traces, and by the way, the green seaweed above the waterline.


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                  • Ohio Class SSBN being drydock for refit. Light green at the waterline and mottled darkgreen/brown below that that extends 2/3 down the side of the hull. You can still see antifouling red at the bottom.
                     
                    Last edited by redboat219; 02-03-2022, 12:16 AM.
                    Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

                    Comment


                    • I seem to remember someone building a Type XIII.
                      Of the 40,000 men who served on German submarines, 30,000 never returned.”

                      Comment


                      • Here are some photos that clearly show the marine life below the waterline of the submarine Akula from the beginning to the final gradual death. The mottled colors range from brown to off-white. The volume of the submarine on the water surface is not fixed, and the submarine does not necessarily always remain at the waterline. So there is a situation where there are greyish-white mottled marks at the waterline (marine life is dead) and normal brown mottled marks below the waterline (marine life is alive), this situation should also be the marine weathering when the submarine was in normal service.


                        V

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                        • Originally posted by Das Boot View Post
                          I seem to remember someone building a Type XIII.
                          Yes but this is relevant once it's time to paint and weathering it.
                          Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Sam Victory View Post
                            Please correct me if I'm wrong. The longer a submarine stays in dry dock, the more the marine life below the waterline will gradually die and will take on a mottled off-white color, you can look at the I-400 submarine at Pearl Harbor to be inspected and it is almost all white below the waterline. And the submarines in service, where the marine life below the waterline is not dead, perhaps the dark brown color better reflects the mottled traces, and by the way, the green seaweed above the waterline.


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                            Your observation as to the color change from in-water to out-of-water is valid. As a Navy Diver I did a lot of hull scrubbing in the day and can attest to the difference in appearance of the living and dean marine growth on a hull. As to the bands of discoloration near the designed waterline, two things at work: one is, as you stated, different freeboard heights do to variances in stores, fuel, weapons load and auxiliary tank levels (all resolved before the boat gets underway). And what I call the Parfait Sunday effect (look it up): the stratification of solids and chemicals near the surface of the water, which imprints onto the submarine if it stays tied up to a pier for any significant amount of time. Some examples of the 'banding' near the waterline on a few of my models:




















                            David
                            Resident Luddite

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

                              Your observation as to the color change from in-water to out-of-water is valid. As a Navy Diver I did a lot of hull scrubbing in the day and can attest to the difference in appearance of the living and dean marine growth on a hull. As to the bands of discoloration near the designed waterline, two things at work: one is, as you stated, different freeboard heights do to variances in stores, fuel, weapons load and auxiliary tank levels (all resolved before the boat gets underway). And what I call the Parfait Sunday effect (look it up): the stratification of solids and chemicals near the surface of the water, which imprints onto the submarine if it stays tied up to a pier for any significant amount of time. Some examples of the 'banding' near the waterline on a few of my models:




















                              David
                              Thank you very much for your guidance, sir, I still have a lot to learn.

                              V

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Sam Victory View Post

                                Thank you very much for your guidance, sir, I still have a lot to learn.

                                V
                                We ALL do!
                                Resident Luddite

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