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  • Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
    How did you make the gimbal, specially those trunnions?
    I bored out a length of machine brass round-stock to accommodate an Oilite propeller shaft bearing. Before that I drilled a transverse hole into the after end of the gimbal to accept the two soldered in place trunnions.

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    The gimbal foundation was a larger diameter length of machine brass round-stock bored to produce a non-interference fit to the gimbal. The foundation bore ends were scalloped to permit the pitching motion of the gimbal. Further, the after end of the foundation was milled with two grooves to accept the gimbal trunnions. It is about those trunnions that the gimbal rotates.

    David
    Resident Luddite

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Ken_NJ View Post
      David, when you solder such items as the bellcrank, do you silver solder them or do use typical 60/40 solder?
      Just nasty old 60/40, Ken. Silver solder is over-kill for our kind of work.

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      David
      Resident Luddite

      Comment


      • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

        I bored out a length of machine brass round-stock to accommodate an Oilite propeller shaft bearing. Before that I drilled a transverse hole into the after end of the gimbal to accept the two soldered in place trunnions.

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        The gimbal foundation was a larger diameter length of machine brass round-stock bored to produce a non-interference fit to the gimbal. The foundation bore ends were scalloped to permit the pitching motion of the gimbal. Further, the after end of the foundation was milled with two grooves to accept the gimbal trunnions. It is about those trunnions that the gimbal rotates.

        David
        okey, got it.
        Something like a Dumas coupler. Click image for larger version

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        Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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        • Yup........
          Resident Luddite

          Comment


          • David, forgive me if I have asked this before but what is the resin you used to make your bulkheads, seals and other items? Is it a BJB product?

            Comment


            • Originally posted by RCJetDude View Post
              David, forgive me if I have asked this before but what is the resin you used to make your bulkheads, seals and other items? Is it a BJB product?
              I used to use the BJB-810. But two decades ago switched to Alumilite RC-3. Quck de-mold time, short (very short) pot-life. receptive to coloring agents and fillers, and once opened the containers have a reasonably long shelf-life. I would date the stuff if it would only answer my e-mails.

              Alumires (RC-3) Tan (alumilite.com)



              Resident Luddite

              Comment


              • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

                I used to use the BJB-810. But two decades ago switched to Alumilite RC-3. Quck de-mold time, short (very short) pot-life. receptive to coloring agents and fillers, and once opened the containers have a reasonably long shelf-life. I would date the stuff if it would only answer my e-mails.

                Alumires (RC-3) Tan (alumilite.com)



                LOL! That is hilarious! Thank you.

                Comment


                • One word of caution, Steve: This stuff will degrade over time, so don't buy it at the local Crafts, or Hobby shop -- no telling how long it's been cooking on the shelf. Order the stuff from the manufacturer. That way you get your resin from a recently produced batch.

                  David
                  Resident Luddite

                  Comment


                  • The final product produced from a mold is only as good as the master. What material do you use for the mold David? Is some sort of mold release required as well?

                    I dabbled making a 54 inch surface boat mold decades ago, still have the mold. Made of polyester resin. I used a liquid mold release. Recall hearing that wonderful pop sound of the hull separating from the mold.

                    Always wanted to play with the mold process but need a subject. Thought of molding 1:24 scale people, 2.75" tall and I would need many of them, for my surface boats. Now we have 3D printing, another craft I hesitate to get into.
                    Last edited by Ken_NJ; 10-11-2021, 01:46 PM.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Ken_NJ View Post
                      The final product produced from a mold is only as good as the master. What material do you use for the mold David? Is some sort of mold release required as well?

                      I dabbled making a 54 inch surface boat mold decades ago, still have the mold. Made of polyester resin. I used a liquid mold release. Recall hearing that wonderful pop sound of the hull separating from the mold.

                      Always wanted to play with the mold process but need a subject. Thought of molding 1:24 scale people, 2.75" tall and I would need many of them, for my surface boats. Now we have 3D printing, another craft I hesitate to get into.
                      For almost all of my resin and metal casting tools I use BJB's, TC-5050. It's that blue stuff. The part-release system I use is a silicon oil spray followed by a dusting with corn starch or talk powder.

                      For a more in-depth look at the process I refer you to this article at another site that I recently authored: post #976 Warship Models Underway Message Board 2.2.3 - HMS Cardiff - 1/96 (mysite.com)

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                      Sounds like you were using a hard-shell tool. Your part-release system of choice should have been a good waxing followed by several layers of PVC. Works for me.

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                      The rubber I use to make large glove-molds is BJB's TC-5040.

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                      David
                      Resident Luddite

                      Comment


                      • Not to overload you with questions but I am having a hard time determining the size of the markings for my 1/72 THRESHER and a source for them. I know of the Woodland Scenics dry transfers which might work for some of the smaller markings and I got some vinyl numbers but they are crap and not the right font. Do you paint your larger numbers or use something else and where can I find a drawing or specs for the markings on the THRESHER/ PERMIT if at all? Thank you.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by RCJetDude View Post
                          Not to overload you with questions but I am having a hard time determining the size of the markings for my 1/72 THRESHER and a source for them. I know of the Woodland Scenics dry transfers which might work for some of the smaller markings and I got some vinyl numbers but they are crap and not the right font. Do you paint your larger numbers or use something else and where can I find a drawing or specs for the markings on the THRESHER/ PERMIT if at all? Thank you.
                          Here's how I paint on the 'navy' block style numbers. As well I've added some pointers on specialized marking tools.

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                          Resident Luddite

                          Comment


                          • Do you clear coat first to prevent any bleeding under the tape? That paint "stylus" or whatever you call it is genius! Time for more tribute.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by RCJetDude View Post
                              Do you clear coat first to prevent any bleeding under the tape? That paint "stylus" or whatever you call it is genius! Time for more tribute.
                              I did clear-coat first when I was painting balsa airplanes, but that was a long time ago. If you first mount a length of masking tape on a clean cutting board and cut away the factory edge, you won't have bleed problems on a well filled, primed, and painted surface.

                              What I made there, from a length of 1/8" diameter machine-brass rod, was a common old bow type drafter's pen. Old school! In Junior High we would make these things in Metal Shop, then, next period, use them during Mechanical Drawing. So... they teach this stuff anymore?! Nice thing about that pen is that opening the quill space and adjusting the viscosity of the paint, you can get a reasonably large variance in line width.

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                              TRIBUT... I must have TRIBUT! for I am a vengeful, angry, demanding, spiteful God! TRIBUT!



                              David
                              ...reaching for the med's I missed this morning
                              Resident Luddite

                              Comment


                              • Check your email.
                                Last edited by Das Boot; 10-12-2021, 11:47 AM.
                                Of the 40,000 men who served on German submarines, 30,000 never returned.”

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