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jims Tyhpoon TK-208 build

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  • #91
    finished scratch part and vintage photos
    Attached Files
    Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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    • #92
      very long sub
      Attached Files
      Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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      • #93
        Those are for the towed array sonar. Not all subs had them the colour pictures you posted are from the last refit of TK208 when she was renamed Dmitriy Donskoi. TK208 did not have them as built.

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        • #94
          Tk 20 had them from the start.

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          • #95
            Originally posted by Mankster View Post
            Tk 20 had them from the start.
            excellent yes i was just having fun to let the public guess what they were before I told. For a long time i did not know what they were since the kit I have from Engel does not come with them. I put some on to make it look more detailed interesting. Planning to add detail to the conning tower as well . To me its performance and detail, that makes a RC sub comes to life. God I love building these things. There a big challenge to me but a lot of fun .
            cheers Jim
            Last edited by deepseadiver; 01-26-2019, 08:08 PM.
            Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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            • #96
              Hi bob and everyone I really like advice on anything I can do to make this sub more interesting with detail.

              question for everyone in time I will have to paint this beast, what are ideas in prepping the body for painting what brand of flat paint. Plus should I use a primer . I don't want to paint to much that the itching marks fade away that are on the body. Those little squares which i think suppose to be patches of rubber on the real one if I'm correct
              .

              cheers
              Last edited by deepseadiver; 01-25-2019, 06:58 PM.
              Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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              • #97
                Yes, Jim. The squares are anechoic tiles. I found a great automotive black primer that I use almost exclusively. Definitely prime prior to painting. These boats are going to get abused in the water, particularly under the nose from when you dive into the lake bottom (it will happen!).

                For paint, most people like a very dark gray, which offers a far more scale appearance than true black (just take a look at any reference photo online). If you do go black, ensure it is matte finish. You can also use white pastel powder to rub in a downward motion. If done correctly, this will yield subtle streaking and convert the black to a gray color. This also has the added advantage of emphasizing the tiles, as the gaps remain dark while the tile faces get lighter.

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                • #98
                  Originally posted by SubHuman View Post
                  Yes, Jim. The squares are anechoic tiles. I found a great automotive black primer that I use almost exclusively. Definitely prime prior to painting. These boats are going to get abused in the water, particularly under the nose from when you dive into the lake bottom (it will happen!).

                  For paint, most people like a very dark gray, which offers a far more scale appearance than true black (just take a look at any reference photo online). If you do go black, ensure it is matte finish. You can also use white pastel powder to rub in a downward motion. If done correctly, this will yield subtle streaking and convert the black to a gray color. This also has the added advantage of emphasizing the tiles, as the gaps remain dark while the tile faces get lighter.
                  that's some fancy advice I do understand what you said now. I get to think on what approach I will take. Good advice thanks a bunch!

                  Piece
                  Jim
                  Last edited by deepseadiver; 01-29-2019, 05:53 PM.
                  Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Jim,

                    I concur with Bob, for very larger models I start with automotive primer, but it must be rubbed down to get an even finish.

                    Then I use Humbrol or Tamiya acrylic spray cans, and for small details Humbrol enamel tins with a small paint brush.

                    The final coat is a flat varnish, I use Rustoleum Clear Matt spray cans, it's vital to spray a few very light coats to get a smooth finish.

                    Top tip I learned is that you should spend 3 times more time masking and prepping than actually painting!

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0591 (800x600).jpg Views:	1 Size:	38.7 KB ID:	113955Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0490 (640x480).jpg Views:	1 Size:	43.2 KB ID:	113704

                    My steam coaster ( 4 foot long ) was painted this way.

                    A large sub in mostly one colour (black) shouldn't present too many issues.



                    Rob
                    ''We're after men, and I wish to God I was with them........!''

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by The Boattrainman View Post
                      Jim,

                      I concur with Bob, for very larger models I start with automotive primer, but it must be rubbed down to get an even finish.

                      Then I use Humbrol or Tamiya acrylic spray cans, and for small details Humbrol enamel tins with a small paint brush.

                      The final coat is a flat varnish, I use Rustoleum Clear Matt spray cans, it's vital to spray a few very light coats to get a smooth finish.

                      Top tip I learned is that you should spend 3 times more time masking and prepping than actually painting!

                      Click image for larger version Name:	IMG_0591 (800x600).jpg Views:	1 Size:	38.7 KB ID:	113955Click image for larger version Name:	IMG_0490 (640x480).jpg Views:	1 Size:	43.2 KB ID:	113704

                      My steam coaster ( 4 foot long ) was painted this way.

                      A large sub in mostly one colour (black) shouldn't present too many issues.



                      Rob
                      nice pictures Rob,

                      question I feel silly asking this but what does rubbed down to get a even finished mean. Does this mean to work the paint in by hand with a sponge brush please explain so I do it right.

                      piece
                      Jim
                      Last edited by deepseadiver; 01-29-2019, 05:59 PM. Reason: spelling
                      Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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                      • Jim,

                        No prob, I had to learn all this myself.

                        So when the primer goes on, it can tend to bunch up around details, corners etc. The best way to notice this is by feel, your fingers will feel the rougher bits and if you look closely along the model rather than down on it from a distance you will see the rougher bits.

                        To fix these, I use 400 grit sandpaper for rougher sections, and 600 grit for less rough sections, never use anything rougher than that or you'll rub off the primer and have to do it again. Don't worry if you rub off a small bit here and there, a light spray will sort those, but you don't want to remove huge sections of primer. Spray from 18 inches and never stop moving the paint can up and down, if you stop you'll dump a load of paint in one spot. Start spraying off the model and move the can towards the model, that way any blobs that may come off the initial spray will miss the model. Sounds a bit complicated, but it's easy once you get going. I would practice on a bit of scrap plastic or an old model before you tackle your expensive sub.

                        Don't apply a heavy coat of primer, several light coats are better, just a misting each time will do, and leave plenty of drying time between coats.

                        When you are happy that you've an even surface and removed any rough patches, lightly sand the entire model with 1000 grit sandpaper before the actual paint colour goes on.

                        Never panic. If you spray too much it can be sanded off once dried. Even if you make a mess of it, you can still remove the paint and start again, it'll be time consuming but you want a good paint job for such a nice model. Even though I've made plenty of models, I still made a hash of some of the paint work on my U557, but it can all be sorted, never lose confidence.

                        The great news for you is that the Typhoon is almost one colour (black or dark grey), a great way to start in my view.

                        Don't even consider 'weathering' at this stage, try to get a nice ex-works look to the Typhoon first. Painting a boat is basic craft, weathering is an art form and not for new modellers (I barely weather mine).

                        I hope that helps, keep in touch if I or any of the amazing modellers here can be of assistance.

                        Rob
                        ''We're after men, and I wish to God I was with them........!''

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                        • pictures more pictures
                          Attached Files
                          Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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                          • pictures more pictures
                            Attached Files
                            Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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                            • attached more detail
                              Attached Files
                              Last edited by deepseadiver; 02-02-2019, 03:57 AM.
                              Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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                              • much better then the old rounded look
                                Attached Files
                                Last edited by deepseadiver; 02-02-2019, 04:02 AM.
                                Put your mind to it. If there's a will there's a way!

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