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3D Printing Submariens and Sub Components

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  • trout
    replied
    Bart, i really appreciate your honesty on what worked or didn’t work. We all learn both ways. Thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Bart,

    All my joking and cheap-shots aside, what you are doing -- specifically your identification of methodologies that result in failure -- is so instructive. The Craft is an exploration of what works and does not work. Without a clear presentation of what does not work we are left to repeat your wrong turns.

    It's a sign of good character when the teacher identifies and explains the shortcomings of a process that does not produce the desired results. It clears the path for us students; it makes the trek an easier one for us all.

    Good on ya, my friend.

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • bwi 971
    replied
    Originally posted by trout View Post
    Bart, used 3D printing for his scribing mask, brilliant use.
    Please be aware that although the idea was indeed brilliant...........the end result was horrible imo.....could not make it work.......not a straight or plum line on the sub.......thought I could rectify it.........no such thing......did the whole upper hull.......Will start filling up all the scribing lines today and start making my usual brass stencils.

    What it was good for was to use it as a drilling stencil for all the holes in the deck. Lessons learned.

    Grtz,
    Bart








    Leave a comment:


  • rwtdiver
    replied
    Originally posted by trout View Post
    I use 3D printing a lot. maybe I have found that I rarely can handcraft something that is symmetrical or straight. Using 3D printing also allows me to get more done. I can have something printing while I do other things (like spend time with the family). That being said, 3D printing allows me to create things that would not be normally done. As an example on my Skipjack the water intake to the piston was created to go around items in the WTC. fabricating that by hand (for me) would put me in a padded room.
    Click image for larger version

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    This WTC is 3D printed (minus seals, o-rings, electronics, screws...you get what I mean).
    3D printing is here to stay and is bringing more people into our hobby. I cannot tell you how many times I have been contacted, but it is bringing some of those that never would have gotten into this hobby. It is also bringing people to use traditional construction techniques and teaching the hand skills those that object to 3D printing complain about (you know who you are). It is bringing in skills the back way.
    Bart, used 3D printing for his scribing mask, brilliant use. I am going to purchase the Typhoon file (it is the perfect size in 1/144 scale - thank you Bob). In time the technology will get better and offer more opportunities. I am excited to see what people continue to do with this "new" tool.
    Peace,
    Tom
    Hi Tom,

    I am 3D Printing all the way!

    Click image for larger version

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    Rob

    "Firemen can stand the heat"

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    We have become enslaved to electron flow.

    Take todays young 'Machinist' or engineer. How will they cope one second after?

    Leave a comment:


  • trout
    replied
    I use 3D printing a lot. maybe I have found that I rarely can handcraft something that is symmetrical or straight. Using 3D printing also allows me to get more done. I can have something printing while I do other things (like spend time with the family). That being said, 3D printing allows me to create things that would not be normally done. As an example on my Skipjack the water intake to the piston was created to go around items in the WTC. fabricating that by hand (for me) would put me in a padded room.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Piston_WTC.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	88.8 KB
ID:	143488
    This WTC is 3D printed (minus seals, o-rings, electronics, screws...you get what I mean).
    3D printing is here to stay and is bringing more people into our hobby. I cannot tell you how many times I have been contacted, but it is bringing some of those that never would have gotten into this hobby. It is also bringing people to use traditional construction techniques and teaching the hand skills those that object to 3D printing complain about (you know who you are). It is bringing in skills the back way.
    Bart, used 3D printing for his scribing mask, brilliant use. I am going to purchase the Typhoon file (it is the perfect size in 1/144 scale - thank you Bob). In time the technology will get better and offer more opportunities. I am excited to see what people continue to do with this "new" tool.
    Peace,
    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • bwi 971
    replied
    Hi Guys,


    What's in it to me.

    I strongly believe that 3D printing will be the future. However, although print quality is getting very good, artifacts are still inevitable.


    For the moment 3D printing can be used as an aide but not as an end product in modeling for me.

    Same goes for CNC routers for home use, although the quality of the product is fore better then 3D printing, small details forget about it.


    I use both, depending on the cost and time involved I go for one or the other.......or often chose for hand crafting, as it is more time and cost effective.

    I use the "new tech to my benefits, but people must be aware that it has its limitations.


    Just want to point that out for those who wants to "dive in" (sorry for the use of that @subculture)


    Grtz,

    Bart

    Leave a comment:


  • RCJetDude
    replied
    The amount of time I will save sanding and filling, the fretting I will spare myself over the effects of the sun and the amount of primer I will save should more than make up for the price increase.
    Last edited by RCJetDude; 09-10-2020, 05:54 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sinksalot
    replied
    Originally posted by RCJetDude View Post

    I got the black and started printing with it yesterday. So far I am impressed. I replaced the magnetic build surface with a piece of mirror. Using Magigoo to adhere the part to the plate. I also upgraded my hot end to one with a titanium heat break intended to eliminate heat creep and clogging. Printing in a heated enclosure maintaining 40 C. Nozzle is 260 C and bed is 90 C. Printing at 0.12 mm layer height and 40 mm/s speed. No visible warping or lifting from the bed. For what I am printing it is very smooth. I printed a sample part and let it sit on my driveway for about 4 hours in direct sunlight and it didn't even get soft. All I can say is it is very promising.
    I only used white so far. However I have my enclosure set at 55 C. I use a heater I got off amazon with a Temperature Controller 110V Digital Thermostat Switch that measures the temp in the enclosure and turn the heat on and off to maintain the temp.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    The only thing I dont like about ASA filament, other then how hard it is to print, is the cost. I mostly use PLA and ABS filment that cost $15 a spool. This ASA is double the cost. But I sure once I get my Saturn resin printer I be yelling about the cost of resin too lol.

    One final piece of advice. I do not have my control board electronics or my LCD screen inside my enclosure as heat can kill electronics and LCD screens.

    Here is a picture of my home made enclosure.
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    Last edited by Sinksalot; 09-10-2020, 04:46 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • RCJetDude
    replied
    Originally posted by Sinksalot View Post
    I just left the Hull part in the back yard. Well i was lazy to get it from the back yard. So lets see what a week in the sun will do lol. I know people use the black version to print replacement black parts for the plastic parts on cars. Here is where I buy my ASA Filament:

    https://www.amazon.com/Polymaker-Pri.../dp/B07QM79N45

    Comes in white or black.
    I got the black and started printing with it yesterday. So far I am impressed. I replaced the magnetic build surface with a piece of mirror. Using Magigoo to adhere the part to the plate. I also upgraded my hot end to one with a titanium heat break intended to eliminate heat creep and clogging. Printing in a heated enclosure maintaining 40 C. Nozzle is 260 C and bed is 90 C. Printing at 0.12 mm layer height and 40 mm/s speed. No visible warping or lifting from the bed. For what I am printing it is very smooth. I printed a sample part and let it sit on my driveway for about 4 hours in direct sunlight and it didn't even get soft. All I can say is it is very promising.

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by rwtdiver View Post

    Thank David!

    I did check in with Bob, and he said OK to do, but suggested that I set it up under it's own blog that way people can respond to it easier!

    Side Note: I have finally started the long awaited Moebius Skipjack build! I have your 3.5" SD and your new fitting kit so I am ready! I will be installing functional sail planes as well! Thanks again for the great video show the sail planes in action.

    Rob

    "Firemen can stand the heat"
    Looking forward to both projects, Rob.

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • rwtdiver
    replied
    Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

    Bob's the final arbiter, of course. But I'm game -- most techniques you will present are transferable to model submarines.

    You've been banned already today (me too), so double-down, pal. Push that envelop!

    David
    Thank David!

    I did check in with Bob, and he said OK to do, but suggested that I set it up under it's own blog that way people can respond to it easier!

    Side Note: I have finally started the long awaited Moebius Skipjack build! I have your 3.5" SD and your new fitting kit so I am ready! I will be installing functional sail planes as well! Thanks again for the great video show the sail planes in action.

    Rob

    "Firemen can stand the heat"

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by rwtdiver View Post
    OK! I have a Question: This blog and this forum for that matter is set up for 3D printing Submarines and parts for Submarines, and building other type of Sub kits! I have another project that I would like to do and use this blog for the build if possible!

    Click image for larger version

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    This is a 3D printed full RC operational model of a WWll Submarine Chaser "194" It is the scale model of the full scale boat! It will finish out to about 36" in length and a beam of 5.5"! I do realize it does not fit into what we do here, but it is Submarine related.

    Please give me your input as to if it would fill the bill here and be OK on this blog! Thank you!

    Rob

    "Firemen can stand the heat"


    Bob's the final arbiter, of course. But I'm game -- most techniques you will present are transferable to model submarines.

    You've been banned already today (me too), so double-down, pal. Push that envelop!

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • rwtdiver
    replied
    OK! I have a Question: This blog and this forum for that matter is set up for 3D printing Submarines and parts for Submarines, and building other type of Sub kits! I have another project that I would like to do and use this blog for the build if possible!

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Sub Chaser.jpg
Views:	141
Size:	65.4 KB
ID:	143234

    This is a 3D printed full RC operational model of a WWll Submarine Chaser "194" It is the scale model of the full scale boat! It will finish out to about 36" in length and a beam of 5.5"! I do realize it does not fit into what we do here, but it is Submarine related.

    Please give me your input as to if it would fill the bill here and be OK on this blog! Thank you!

    Rob

    "Firemen can stand the heat"



    Leave a comment:


  • SubHuman
    replied
    I started a print of the upcoming Delphin kit in white ASA before I left for Texas and it was going well. When I get back I’ll see how it turned out and post pics.

    One thing I will say is you need a really hot bed, an enclosed chamber and a hot tip in order to make it work. Not all printers will handle it....

    Leave a comment:

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