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3D Printing Submariens and Sub Components

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  • #31
    Hi Rob,

    Your WTC looks great. Yea end caps are the hardest part of a the WTC to make. If your printing you own, PLA is ok, but ABS or ASA filament is better for end caps. However you will need your 3D printer in a enclosure to keep the filament from cracking or warping. That being said a few people have switch over to Resin 3D printers for making end caps and other parts. I dont own a Resin 3D printer, yet.. Small ones can be gotten for about $200. But I want a large one that prints at least 200mm and those are $1000 or higher yet. I would like to 3D print the whole hull in resin.

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    • #32
      Sinksalot,

      I am really not interested in using any other filament other than PLA! Its safer for the environment, does not smell up the hobby room. Plus you do not need to spend thousands of dollars for new printers. My take on it is to use proper gluing methods, primers and sealers to get the results I am after. If I where going to build submarines and SD/MSD the way they should be, I would get with the guys in the know! (David Merriman, Tom, Bob Martin "SUB Ed", and all the others) and learn the old tried and true methods and do it right!!

      I do understand where you are coming from and I am sure as time progresses forward with 3D printing, that new innovative 3D printing machines and filament materials will sprout up and really change the way this hobby is being done. I am not trying to change the world of sub building (to old for that) just want to learn as I go and use the 3D Printing processes that I know and understand! BUT most of all have fun with this hobby!!

      Rob,

      "Firemen can stand the heat"

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      • #33
        Yep having fun is the most important thing in this hobby. Please keep up the good work and keep posting your pictures. Just remember, you never to old to have fun!

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        • #34
          Filament based 3d printers are the equivalent to dot matrix paper printers, IMO. Laser and inkjet made obsolete. I think the future consumer level machines will be powder and resin based. Resin is already here to some extent, but will get cheaper with a greater range of materials. Powder based sintering is still the province of expensive machines, but is getting cheaper, and will continue to do so with material range growing too. the anisotropic properties of sintered items are far superior to filament printed items.
          DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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          • #35
            I agree with Andy. Filament printers are the placeholder until the better technologies mature.

            While sintered printers offer significantly better parts, they're also much more complicated to operate, which will make them less approachable by the general population. Filament printers have the advantage of simplicity. Load and go. Lots of pre and post-production on sintered parts. Resin has a lot of opportunity, but it's messy and more complicated as well.

            Regardless, we'll see this technology advancing quickly.

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            • #36
              They'll get easier. If they hope to crack mass production they'll have to, along with repeatable consistency.

              The first commercial laser printer by HP cost about 8k in todays money, now you can get a very good laser printer for about fifty quid. I don't think 3d printing will ever trickle down to the cost levels that paper printing did, but I can envisage binder jet machines coming down to he sub 2k mark within the next five years. Couple that with much easier and intuitive software plus the 3d scanners that are already appearing on smartphones and tablets, and there isn't going to be much that is off limits.
              DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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              • #37
                Resins & powders will undoubtedly be the new future, to an extent for our hobby! Manufacturing a true water tight cylinder end cap is at this point still in the hands of real craftsman, such as David Merriman! I will bet that not all 3" (as an example) cylinders are true 3". There fore a lathe and accomplished hands can provide the tolerances required to achieve the fit required along with the correct seal to achieve that perfect non-leaking end cap!

                As much as I enjoy 3D Printing, nothing will replace the hands on craftsman!!

                Rob

                "Firemen can stand the heat"
                Last edited by rwtdiver; 03-30-2020, 04:48 PM. Reason: add on

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                • #38
                  Extruded tubing varies in internal diameter consistency enormously, but if you measure the tube in advance, you can tweak the cad to suit before printing.

                  A lathe is the ultimate universal machine for a model submariner looking to make their own watertight parts. It trumps a 3d printer every time for me, which is a 'nice to have'.

                  Still it's surprising how very few are willing to spend the modest investment on such a machine tool, in spite of the fact it'll largely pay for itself the first WTC you make. Naturally you need to know how to use it, but the kinds of parts need in a WTC don't not constitute advanced turning practices, and you can pick up the basics very quickly. Tolerances are also fairly wide, so you don't need to have the greatest lathe either. Turning parts is fun, and you can build what you want or need, rather than what is commercially available.
                  DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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                  • #39
                    I got my Redoutable trimmed out. Took a day and a half but it sits well at the waterline and washes over the deck evenly when statically diving and completely submerges. It may need some tweaking but is at a good starting point. Once I get my receivers back it will be ready for a maiden voyage. Very stoked. Its almost done.

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                    • #40
                      RCJetDude,

                      That great that your water test went so well! Is it possible for you to upload a photo of your hull showing the placement and amount of foam you used to trim out the surface aspect of your boat? This could give me a starting point on mine! Thank you!

                      I just finished up the primer on the bottom portion of my hull, I am now ready to start the final finish work to the hull! (sanding, filler, sanding, filler, and more sanding):-))

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                      This project is coming along faster than I thought, but now that the Gov. of Arizona and Mayor of Gilbert have put a lock down on us untill April 30th, that will mean a lot more time to build!

                      I do hope all of you are staying WELL & SAFE!!!

                      Rob

                      "Firemen can stand the heat"

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                      • #41
                        Here you go. I am using a 2.5"/3"/2.5" modular sub driver with an 11.25" long ballast chamber. Here are pictures of how mine ended up. I have a 3300 3S LiPo in the front.

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                        Last edited by RCJetDude; 03-30-2020, 10:13 PM.

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                        • #42
                          RCJetDude,

                          Thank you very much for the great photos! The size and location of your foam installation is going to be very helpful to me as a starting point! Thank you!!

                          Ounce again, I really like your color scheme! You have done an excellent job with your build and the MSD installation.

                          Thanks again!

                          Rob

                          "Firemen can stand the heat"

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                          • #43
                            Today I spent time sanding and filling. After which I gave the boat 2 coats of SEM primer and sanded one more time. I gave it one more coat of SEM primer and letting it dry overnight! Tomorrow a light sanding with a 400 paper, and then the final flat black finish with a very light matt clear coat.

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                            After the final finish has dried I will add the sail components and do some final tough up work! Then this boat is finished!!!!:-))

                            Rob

                            "Firemen can stand the heat"

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                            • #44
                              Rob,
                              Excellent!
                              Nice work and thank you for documenting it.
                              Peace,
                              Tom
                              If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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                              • #45
                                Getting close Rob. Looks like you are almost there. Exciting isn't it?

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