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  • Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
    Just want to share what I recently found.
    Ladies may want to hold onto something.
    Filmed with a high-tech 2pixel camera.
    Resident Luddite

    Comment


    • Love the moustache and beard. Real ladykiller.
      Last edited by redboat219; 02-15-2022, 11:06 AM.
      Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

      Comment


      • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

        Nothing to it, Manfred. Just like this:

        https://youtu.be/5i9ojh0SN9w
        Yughh, i think in pictures, thanks David

        Manfred

        Scrubbing his brain
        I went underground

        Comment


        • Originally posted by MFR1964 View Post

          Yughh, i think in pictures, thanks David

          Manfred

          Scrubbing his brain
          LOL!... Gotcha!

          David
          Resident Luddite

          Comment




          • There's a lot going on within the massive sail of this Type-23 submarine model: The FPV enclosure, with its lens peeking out from where the removable deck-gear access door fit; the snorkel induction valve, an important element of the WTC's ballast sub-system; and the magnetically latched foundation that permits raising and lowering of the models 'scale' snorkel induction and exhaust tubes.

            All these things have to be easily accessed for adjustment and repair should the need arise during the operational lifetime of this model. That's why I made attachment of the sail to the hull a magnetic one -- to permit quick and easy access to the sails internals.



            All the gizmos that fit within the sail: To the extreme left is the models non-functional scale snorkel mast, and just below it the foundation/platform that permits smooth travel for the mast from the 'retracted' to the 'raised' position (this foundation also provides a short length of tube that receives the base of the removable DF antenna.

            To the left of the sails trailing edge is the practical SemiASspirated (SAS) float actuated snorkel valve, it's foundation mounted to a G10 sheet adapter platform that interfaces with the sails interior.

            Atop the sail is a fully operational watertight FPV enclosure.

            To the right of the sails leading edge are the internal strong-back and scale deck-gear access door. A magnet on the strong-back and another in the door permit attachment to the models sail when the FPV enclosure is not installed.



            As you can see, inclusion of all these things within the sail takes a bit of planning and black magic to accomplish. As is my want in this game, I make as many sub-assemblies removable as possible. All but the scale snorkel foundation are either attached with mechanical fasteners (machine screws), Velcro strap, or through the use of magnets. The scale snorkel foundation is semi-removable as it is secured within the sail through tack-gluing -- bonds that can be easily broken without damage to foundation or interior of the sail.



            Before any tool was lifted, or raw material cut to shape, I first did a paper-study of what would go where within sail. This done to work out, on paper, what would go where. This is the poor-man's way of working out system integration before committing to stupid moves that usually lead to paradoxical interference situations between part-A and part-B.

            (In the days before CAD modeling big outfits like Gibbs & Cox would actually build big 'proof' models out of clear Plexiglas to assure their naval Architects that any system paradoxes that slipped by the Drafting department were identified and corrected in-house before any metal plate was cut at the shipyard).

            The design process starts right here at this table where I'm banging out yet another installment to this never-ending, soul-crushing screed -- to my right will be a fresh, unmolested post-it-note awaiting scribbling as an idea leaks out of my head in the middle of my keyboard pounding, and demands I address a current shop problem in graphic form.

            You see such a note, now in the shop, used as reference as I work out the internals arrangement -- in this case, the SAS snorkel assembly. The graphic tool here is a full-scale profile drawing of the Type-23's sail. That's how an idea evolves from mind to hardware.

            The major job accomplished at this point is the scale snorkel foundation/platform, which features a magnetic latching scheme that permits me to position the mast to 'retracted', 'raised', or to even remove it.



            And here's the scale snorkel riding within its foundation/platform. The magnets set within the exhaust line of the unit hold the mast in either the 'raised' or 'retracted' positions atop the sail. They 'latch' to the platform mounted mother-magnet.



            Here, the raised scale snorkel is held in the 'raised' position by the magnet set into the lower end of the parts exhaust pipe, held there by its force and the mother-magnet affixed to the bottom of the scale snorkel foundation/platform piece.

            I'll fill over the upper scale snorkel magnet. Once the part is painted no one will know that within it is one of the two latching magnets that positions the mast in either the raised or retracted position.



            Nothing so fancy for the DF antenna, I either plug it in, or yank it out and toss the poor thing into the field-box.



            The SAS ballast sub-system requires a means of actively shutting off the air induction line once the sail dunks under the water. This is accomplished with a simple float actuated snorkel induction assembly, temporarily plumbed into the sub-system to show how it integrates with this models WTC.

            Incidentally, that induction hose is the only physical connection between the mechanisms within the sail and the rest of the model. Which is a good thing: In the very likely situation where the sail is knocked off the hull (road rage unleashed whenever another r/c boat wanders foolishly into my patrol area). It's this hose that will keep the decapitated sail dangling in close proximity to the hull as the model is recovered and the sail unceremoniously plopped back atop the hull (hopefully in time to exact some revenge).

            Only three machine screws are used to secure this easily removed/installed device within the sail.



            This is how the SAS ballast sub-system works. Ballast blow air is either taken from the surface through the snorkel induction assembly when broached or in proper surface trim. However, enough air is available within the WTC's dry spaces that when compressed by the LPB, to blow enough water out of the ballast tank to broach the sail, no matter the depth at which the blow commences (within reason, of course).

            Pretty much how we normally started and completed the main ballast tank blow on the USS TRUTTA back in the day. What's good enough for the US Navy, is good enough for me!



            At the top you see the installed snorkel foundation/platform screwed in place aboard the sail. Note the bottoms of the scale snorkel induction and exhaust pipes projecting through a cut-out at the forward end of the snorkel foundation/platform. Obviously, the scale snorkel is in the 'retracted' position in this shot.
            You can clearly see the magnet equipped strong-back that works to hold the magnet equipped deck-gear access door in place whenever the FPV enclosure in not installed.



            You can just make out the white snorkel float aft of the scale snorkel pipes.

            Without the aid of my basic and refined paper-studies, this job could have turned into a Chinese fire-drill/screaming plumber's-nightmare/useless assemblage of sometimes-working-sometimes-not-working junk.

            I go to the lake/swimming pool to play. Not fix things! Keep it simple. Make it right before it leaves the shop.

            Idea. Planning. Mock-up. Evaluation. Corrections. Implementation.

            If this **** was easy, everyone would be doing it!


            Resident Luddite

            Comment


            • Really good progress on your type XXIII build. Neat magnet set up for the different snorkel positions. From the photos it looks like you may plan to run the antenna from the camera module up the intake tube side of the snorkel mast? I noticed the lack of a metal tubular guide for that part of the snorkel mast which would not likely interfere with the signal.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Monahan Steam Models View Post
                Really good progress on your type XXIII build. Neat magnet set up for the different snorkel positions. From the photos it looks like you may plan to run the antenna from the camera module up the intake tube side of the snorkel mast? I noticed the lack of a metal tubular guide for that part of the snorkel mast which would not likely interfere with the signal.
                Thanks, Nick.

                No. I'm running the camera-transmitter antenna up the periscope tube with the antenna terminating within the hollow resin periscope head. Something like this (other than it will be a transmitting antenna and will be shorter owing to the higher frequency):



                Last edited by He Who Shall Not Be Named; 02-17-2022, 10:36 PM.
                Resident Luddite

                Comment


                • Okay okay, so I need to recalibrate my eyeballs to what you’re up to. Thought I saw something but I was wrong. Carry on

                  Comment


                  • Pee on 2.4. Go with 72 MHz. The airplane guys are on 2.4.
                    Of the 40,000 men who served on German submarines, 30,000 never returned.”

                    Comment


                    • I'm operating the boat with 75mHz equipment and transmitting video at 5.8gHz. The receivers antenna is down inside the boat, outside of the WTC. The transmitters antenna is inside the periscope head.

                      David
                      Confusing Everyone!
                      Resident Luddite

                      Comment


                      • I’m confused. But my dog sleeps beside me and the wife.
                        Last edited by Das Boot; 02-18-2022, 03:37 AM.
                        Of the 40,000 men who served on German submarines, 30,000 never returned.”

                        Comment


                        • Casey,video signal is on 5.8GHz. Antenna is for the camera to permit FPV. Not for the sub.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by RCJetDude View Post
                            Casey,video signal is on 5.8GHz. Antenna is for the camera to permit FPV. Not for the sub.
                            Bingo.

                            Thanks, Steve. Fewer words are often better than too many words.

                            Davi
                            Resident Luddite

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
                              I'm operating the boat with 75mHz equipment and transmitting video at 5.8gHz. The receivers antenna is down inside the boat, outside of the WTC. The transmitters antenna is inside the periscope head.

                              David
                              Confusing Everyone!
                              Now I get it!
                              Of the 40,000 men who served on German submarines, 30,000 never returned.”

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by RCJetDude View Post
                                Casey,video signal is on 5.8GHz. Antenna is for the camera to permit FPV. Not for the sub.
                                The sad part is I already knew that. I just forgot.
                                Of the 40,000 men who served on German submarines, 30,000 never returned.”

                                Comment

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