Bronco 1:35 Type XXIII RC Build/ Conversion

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  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    Moderator
    • Aug 2008
    • 12456

    Originally posted by biggsgolf

    David, any particular reason why you chose not to employ an "ass-heavy waterline?" Was it because it was an early version?



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    I should have. But I missed that subtle point. In my defense: these boats spent more time against a pier in proper surface trim than they did underway -- and a significant portion of that underway time was submerged, hanging off the snorkel. The only time these 'electro boats' were underway on the surface -- and the ass end weighted down so the propeller would be less susceptible of sucking air when pulled through a trough -- would be too and from the patrol area. Chaotic water does not a scum-line permit.

    But I do like the good Doctors representation of the demarcation line 'as designed' and the suggestion of an underway scum-line at the stern. A reasonable presentation of how these boats were trimmed for transits.

    David
    Who is John Galt?

    Comment

    • biggsgolf
      Captain
      • Jan 2020
      • 759

      Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named

      I should have. But I missed that subtle point. In my defense: these boats spent more time against a pier in proper surface trim than they did underway -- and a significant portion of that underway time was submerged, hanging off the snorkel. The only time these 'electro boats' were underway on the surface -- and the ass end weighted down so the propeller would be less susceptible of sucking air when pulled through a trough -- would be too and from the patrol area. Chaotic water does not a scum-line permit.

      But I do like the good Doctors representation of the demarcation line 'as designed' and the suggestion of an underway scum-line at the stern. A reasonable presentation of how these boats were trimmed for transits.

      David
      Dang, was hoping you would present a reason I could use to not do it.... I may wait till I put her in the water and see if I can trim accordingly

      Comment

      • biggsgolf
        Captain
        • Jan 2020
        • 759

        Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named
        Much better.

        David
        David when you outlined "The initial representation of marine grass done, I mixed up the tan acrylic paint with a lot of water solvent. Doing so thinned the paint to the point where its adhesive quality was dangerously low. To increase the binder content of the paint I added clear acrylic medium to restore the sticking power of the paint." am I correct you mixed the Tan paint with water? Why is water better then mixing with thinner or just the clear acrylic medium?

        Comment

        • He Who Shall Not Be Named
          Moderator
          • Aug 2008
          • 12456

          Originally posted by biggsgolf

          David when you outlined "The initial representation of marine grass done, I mixed up the tan acrylic paint with a lot of water solvent. Doing so thinned the paint to the point where its adhesive quality was dangerously low. To increase the binder content of the paint I added clear acrylic medium to restore the sticking power of the paint." am I correct you mixed the Tan paint with water? Why is water better then mixing with thinner or just the clear acrylic medium?
          These days I use water soluble paints for most of the weathering tasks -- the ease of use, quick drying (a heat-gun is your friend), and availability of the stuff makes it extremely user-friendly. Though easily abraded, it's all protected by the final 2K polyurethane, well flattened, clear coat.

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          For water-based paints (acrylic and latex are but two examples of coatings that employ water as a solvent), or any chemistry of paint: if you cut it with too much solvent/thinner, you reduce the 'binder content (the 'glue' that sticks the paint to the substrate) to the extent that its adhesive and binding qualities are compromised. That's why -- when extensively cutting the coating with solvent -- you have to increase the binder content as well.

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          Keep in mind that I also added the 'clear' Artist Medium (binder) to that particular batch of paint to make the coating semi-opaque, not opaque as it would be out of the bottle. The objective was to get the uneven tan color to highlight but not obscure the dark gray and splotching underneath.

          Something to know: Other than watercolors and some inks, water soluble paints are water resistant once thoroughly dry.

          David
          Who is John Galt?

          Comment

          • biggsgolf
            Captain
            • Jan 2020
            • 759

            Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named

            These days I use water soluble paints for most of the weathering tasks -- the ease of use, quick drying (a heat-gun is your friend), and availability of the stuff makes it extremely user-friendly. Though easily abraded, it's all protected by the final 2K polyurethane, well flattened, clear coat.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN0155 (2).jpg
Views:	237
Size:	63.4 KB
ID:	177517

            For water-based paints (acrylic and latex are but two examples of coatings that employ water as a solvent), or any chemistry of paint: if you cut it with too much solvent/thinner, you reduce the 'binder content (the 'glue' that sticks the paint to the substrate) to the extent that its adhesive and binding qualities are compromised. That's why -- when extensively cutting the coating with solvent -- you have to increase the binder content as well.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4314.jpg
Views:	215
Size:	56.8 KB
ID:	177518

            Keep in mind that I also added the 'clear' Artist Medium (binder) to that particular batch of paint to make the coating semi-opaque, not opaque as it would be out of the bottle. The objective was to get the uneven tan color to highlight but not obscure the dark gray and splotching underneath.

            Something to know: Other than watercolors and some inks, water soluble paints are water resistant once thoroughly dry.

            David
            Thanks David!

            Comment

            • biggsgolf
              Captain
              • Jan 2020
              • 759

              I have done enough, next will Clear Coat and move on!
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              Comment

              • He Who Shall Not Be Named
                Moderator
                • Aug 2008
                • 12456

                Originally posted by biggsgolf
                I have done enough, next will Clear Coat and move on!
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                Well done, sir.

                David
                Who is John Galt?

                Comment

                • biggsgolf
                  Captain
                  • Jan 2020
                  • 759

                  Thanks David!

                  Comment

                  • biggsgolf
                    Captain
                    • Jan 2020
                    • 759

                    Waiting on the ordered 250 Series SubDriver from Jason, he updated me that should be complete within a couple of weeks, due to the cold Texas weather he had to relocate his shop to a climate controlled facility.

                    Comment

                    • biggsgolf
                      Captain
                      • Jan 2020
                      • 759

                      Received the Cylinder! Good progress so far, looking forward to completing the Type XXIII
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                      Comment

                      • biggsgolf
                        Captain
                        • Jan 2020
                        • 759

                        Series 250 SubDriver from The Nautilus Drydocks with 7" Ballast Tank, BLM, AD2,Remote ON/OFF Switch, and Emergency Gas Backup System assembled and programmed. So far I "mostly" like this SubDriver. I am concerned that my pump does not sound as loud as the one in the video? I had a difficult time making sure the Motor Wires and the ESC were clear of the spinning motor. Also I may redesign and print a new Battery Tray. With that said, I can now mount the SubDriver in the Type III, and start to hook up the servo control rods and driveshaft etc.
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                        Last edited by biggsgolf; 02-21-2024, 04:08 PM.

                        Comment

                        • rwtdiver
                          Vice Admiral
                          • Feb 2019
                          • 1821

                          Bruce,

                          Looking at you Sub Driver photos, I am assuming you designed and built your ballast tank and control system for it. It looks like you attached that system onto the original 250 series EasyDriver that you got from Jason/Bob Nautilus Drydocks.

                          Looks good! We will all be interested in how that works out...Question: What size and type battery are you running?

                          Rob
                          "Firemen can stand the heat."

                          Comment

                          • biggsgolf
                            Captain
                            • Jan 2020
                            • 759

                            Hi Rob, it is their 250 series with ballast tank SubDriver, they printed the bulkheads in black vs white, I prefer white as one can look at the ballast mechanics better. The battery is 11.1 v, 3s. I use the Spectrum Smart Batteries which you program to discharge after a period of time.


                            Comment

                            • rwtdiver
                              Vice Admiral
                              • Feb 2019
                              • 1821

                              Originally posted by biggsgolf
                              Hi Rob, it is their 250 series with ballast tank SubDriver, they printed the bulkheads in black vs white, I prefer white as one can look at the ballast mechanics better. The battery is 11.1 v, 3s. I use the Spectrum Smart Batteries which you program to discharge after a period of time.

                              OK1 Understand what you have going on. If I would had looked a little closer I could see it was not the 250 Series EasyDriver, but the SubDriver. Thanks for clearing that up. Thank you for the information on the battery that you are using.

                              Rob
                              "Firemen can stand the heat."

                              Comment

                              • biggsgolf
                                Captain
                                • Jan 2020
                                • 759

                                SubDriver cradles I printed are perfect, added 354G of weight
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