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  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    Moderator
    • Aug 2008
    • 12297

    #16
    Originally posted by Albacore 569



    Boy I feel like an ass hxxx.... Excuse me David. I thought you did parts and Greg Jein and his gang in California put it together. Wouldn't joining a Studio Union offer you better pay? I can understand why you wouldn't. You love your independence and artistic freedoms too. So would I.


    Would a DSRV model scaled up to like 1/12 scale make a good search nd rescue underwater drone at all? With a mechanical arm / lights / camera?
    No. The DSRV is too specialized. Off-shore UUV's are the right robot for such jobs.

    Your assumption, Steve, is basically correct. As to our involvement with TV and movie production, Ellie and I built masters and sub-assemblies for the effects miniature makers -- we were always independent, third-party contractors engaged by guys like Greg Jein, who were employed by a studio/Producer to work a particular production. With the exception of one job, we never left Virginia Beach.

    Red October was that rare exception where I was lead on specific vehicle design AND specific sub-assembly fabrication. I provided drawings to the Art Director of the ALFA, LA, and DSRV vehicles. Shortly after that work was submitted Ellie and I were commissioned by Greg (miniatures Lead till things were turned over to ILM -- that's another story!) to do all the propellers, and LA appendages, to varying scales, for Greg's team. Most of our work was retained by the ILM guys after Boss (who employed Greg) got the boot half-way through production.

    Here is some of the work we did for The Hunt for Red October:



















    This is the LA miniature they assembled using castings pulled from tools they made from my appendage masters. The Navy continuity/security guy put the stink-eye on the seven-blade screw I provided. That bump-in the road put Ellie and me into crazy-mode to produce a more 'acceptable' five-bladed wheel to keep the post-production work on schedule. ****!























    Ellie and I, even before we hooked up, were anti-Union. I grew up in Michigan and saw what collective bargaining produces; and Ellie suffered attack from picketers when she pushed through their line while working at EB.

    We were our own people.

    Why seek the level of the most useless guy in the room? That's what Unions and the Guilds breed.

    Professionally, it mattered little to us. We got the jobs; we were good enough to secure work from the effects houses whenever the miniature work was overly complex, or the shop personnel were over-extended.

    However, CGI changed all that.

    David
    D&E Miniatures


    Who is John Galt?

    Comment

    • CC Clarke
      Lieutenant Commander
      • Aug 2020
      • 239

      #17
      Originally posted by Albacore 569



      Boy I feel like an ass hxxx.... Excuse me David. I thought you did parts and Greg Jein and his gang in California put it together. Wouldn't joining a Studio Union offer you better pay? I can understand why you wouldn't. You love your independence and artistic freedoms too. So would I.


      Would a DSRV model scaled up to like 1/12 scale make a good search nd rescue underwater drone at all? With a mechanical arm / lights / camera?
      There are easier 3D base UUVs models for search and rescue work available, but they would need mechanical/electrical mods to be effective. And a dedicated aircraft (or overnight-cable crate) for worldwide deployment. (I've got a Schilling Titan manip with working onboard cameras in a file I animated for demos someplace.)

      But for the heavy lifting, this model I made (with a few touch-ups needed) years ago ought to be sufficient if 3D printed and a lot of bucks thrown at it for thrusters:

      Click image for larger version

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      Click image for larger version

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      • redboat219
        Admiral
        • Dec 2008
        • 2749

        #18
        David,
        were you also involved with Abyss and Crimson Tide?
        Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

        Comment

        • george
          Captain
          • Dec 2010
          • 727

          #19
          Reg. CC Post 14
          Thanks for your reply and I understand your reasoning. I did not want to bother you, just thought I would ask. Thanks for sharing your work here.

          Comment

          • Subculture
            Admiral
            • Feb 2009
            • 2121

            #20
            Click image for larger version

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            I tell a lie, Carsten Heintze has printed one of these models and looks to have it operational, or well on its way to being so anyway.

            Comment

            • He Who Shall Not Be Named
              Moderator
              • Aug 2008
              • 12297

              #21
              Originally posted by redboat219
              David,
              were you also involved with Abyss and Crimson Tide?
              Yup, we did the propellers for Crimson Tide, and I designed the torpedoes. I helped with the OHIO design for The Abyss.



              Who is John Galt?

              Comment

              • CC Clarke
                Lieutenant Commander
                • Aug 2020
                • 239

                #22
                Originally posted by george
                Reg. CC Post 14
                Thanks for your reply and I understand your reasoning. I did not want to bother you, just thought I would ask. Thanks for sharing your work here.
                No problemo!

                CC

                Comment

                • Fishb0y
                  Lieutenant
                  • Jul 2023
                  • 74

                  #23
                  Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named

                  Yup, we did the propellers for Crimson Tide
                  That was the best part of the movie! I'm glad that you had nothing to do with the Captain's dog in the movie.
                  Now if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go on an overnight drunk, and in 10 days I'm going to set out to find the shark that ate my friend and destroy it. Anyone who wants to tag along is more than welcome.

                  Comment

                  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
                    Moderator
                    • Aug 2008
                    • 12297

                    #24
                    Originally posted by Fishb0y

                    That was the best part of the movie! I'm glad that you had nothing to do with the Captain's dog in the movie.
                    Anyone leaving their dog's ****/**** on my deck plates, action would have been taken. One possibility: Wait for the quarterly PMS cycling of the forward signal ejector -- though only having a three-inch bore, a suitably cut up fido could be made to fit. Filthy animals!

                    David
                    Who is John Galt?

                    Comment

                    • redboat219
                      Admiral
                      • Dec 2008
                      • 2749

                      #25
                      Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named
                      we did the propellers for Crimson Tide, and I designed the torpedoes


                       
                      Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

                      Comment

                      • Albacore 569
                        Commander
                        • Sep 2020
                        • 330

                        #26
                        Love that movie. If the story was real life WTF is that old fart (the character not the RL actor) and his bleep bag Dog doing even on board. He fail promotion review three times and not been moved up or out.? Denzel Washington, his smarts and sense of command floods into the scenes, F****he's the officer that if he ordered us to the bottom to save the world, then to bottom we are going...

                        Gene Hackman as an actor is one of my favorites too. He is my sister's favorite actor too I learned recently.

                        I always wondered if the spark for his character in 'Crimson Tide' was based on the Captain Raaz of the USS Georga in the great Documentary 'Submarines: Sharks of Steel' on the Discovery channel (1993).

                        I remember at a talk at the officer's club at Mare Island, where the Sub Committee was invited to display their submarine models for the sub veterans there. Rear Admiral Richard 'Okane with Alzheimer's disease. & Rear Admiral Jon Barr 1993-1996 SUBCOMPAC were present. He talked about being in Charlie Lockwood's old job & at the presentation. Rear Admiral Barr mentioned Raaz from the documentary and how he made some uncomfortable. That was interesting to hear. Barr didn't elaborate of course. But what a sense of history.


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                        Last edited by Albacore 569; 02-03-2024, 08:40 PM.

                        Comment

                        • CC Clarke
                          Lieutenant Commander
                          • Aug 2020
                          • 239

                          #27
                          I had the honor of meeting Admiral O'Kane at a book signing at Bangor. Great guy. Spent many years working aboard hte Georgia fish and Captain Raaz was quite the character, always walking around with an unlit cigar dangling from his mouth. The ship had just cast off lines and gotten underway for patrol when we received a message that sonar was down. I jumped on a tug and boarded in the Hood Canal. I met the sonar chief, (George Lindell who died early a few years later) and he explained how the system wouldn't communicate with the Central Computer Complex downstairs while they were doing routine PMS. (Planned Maintenance) to ensure the system was running optimally.

                          The Q-6 sonar system had a number of quirks, (technically referred to as System Anomalies) that IBM could never find the root cause for and we, (TRF Sonar shop) had them memorized. A system communications I/O error could be initiated by leaving any of the three console's CRT test switch in the On position after finishing a console diagnostic. I checked each display console and sure enough, someone had forgotten to switch one of them out of test mode. It was probably covered the first day of console maintenance training.

                          This would have been unthinkable for the Sonar Chief to tell the CO, so I dismantled one of the lower electronics chassis and pretended to inspect it. Capt Raaz was in and out of sonar every five minutes. "How long is this gonna take?" he asked. My reply was simple and direct - something he was fond of: "If I can't fix it, it ain't broke, but it's going to take longer if you keep interupting me."

                          A few minutes later, I buttoned everything up and the system came back to life. I explained to him there was a pinched wire that his guys wouldn't have known to look for but I'd seen it once before on another boat. The sonar gang was in stiches when he left the shack and George was very relieved he didn't get relieved.

                          Capt Raaz made it a point to send the TRF CO a nice letter of commendation for me and I received a welcome cash award for the emergent repair. We laughed about that for years whenever their crew was in refit.

                          Comment

                          • Subculture
                            Admiral
                            • Feb 2009
                            • 2121

                            #28
                            Last edited by Subculture; 02-04-2024, 04:49 PM.

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