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  • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

    External linkage elements I wish to avoid.

    David
    I remember reading a discussion here regarding an RC conversion of 1/72 Type XXIII. One of the problems brought up was how to make the rudder control linkages work in the narrow confines of the tail. One proposal was to use fishing line wrapped around the rudder post like in a windlass instead of an arm.
    Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

    Comment


    • I remember Mr. Merriman made this 1/72 XXIII submarine, a very small model. There is very little space there at the stern, and it might be feasible to use this rudder structure in 1/96 XXI.

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      If there is still not enough space, maybe the turning handle connected to the rudder could be made longer, but it might not be a good idea to make the turning handle rotate around a fixed point.

      Click image for larger version

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      If the rudder is driven by a belt, there is not enough space, and if the belt is replaced by an O-ring, it is likely to slip, so I think the best solution for now is the 1/72 XXIII rudder structure, if there is enough space.

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      V

      Comment


      • To prevent the fishing line from slipping on the rudder post it passes through a small hole drilled perpendicular to the shaft. One end of the line connects to the servo the other ends connects to a tensioner to ensure the loop grips the shaft and provides the counter-pull. Click image for larger version

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        Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

        Comment


        • The oil-canning effect applied to the sail. An involved process as it entails multiple applications of strips of masking tape, each piece evenly spaced and applied to right angles to one another. The end result is a checker-board pattern of squares, each with a small feather of light gray in the lower, after corner -- the lighter gray against the dark dark gray suggesting the light source (sun) to be ahead of the subject, denoting late morning, or early afternoon.

          ​​​

          The strips of tape are laid down in checker-board fashion. It will take several cycles of lay-down of these strips to get the full array of plating with the phony, painted on, oil-canning. Note the drawing used as reference --used to guide me as I determined strip width and placement on the sail.

          ​​​

          If you will, the direction of the imagined light source is pointed to by the after tip of the Paasche air-brush used to apply the lightened color to the lower, after corner of each exposed 'square'. Know that only one-quarter of the dished in panels have been represented. The masking will have to be shifted three more times to get them all.

          ​​​

          After the first pass, the masking is removed -- and saved. Then, using the faint variance between dark dark gray and the lighter gray I re-applied the masks to get the second set of squares painted.

          ​​​

          And the last round of strip shifting followed by a corner squirt of paint, and the sail oil-canning is done. Inevitably the work is over-done, but will be toned down later with a careful, well cut mist coating the the dark dark gray till things take on a more realistic look.

          ​​

          Wrapping narrow strips of tape radially around the diesel exhaust line fairing. I used a discarded strip of tape (sized in width to produce the checker-board sail pattern of the sail) to insure correct spacing between the narrow strips of masking. I've seen no evidence of oil-canning on this fairing, but sometimes, when I get into a weathering task I lose all self control. Anyway... it looks nice... screw it... sue me!

          ​​​

          The lightened gray was shot between the narrow strips of masking tape. That done, the masking was removed.

          ​​​

          A fiber-glass bristle 'correction pencil' was used to scrub away the light gray to achieve the look of slight dishing.

          ​​​

          ​​​

          As a practical matter all the hand-hole access points, doors, dead lights, air-induction grating, emergency stern light, and other flush-mounted items on the sides of the sail do not have stringers or frames under them. So, those items are not subject to the distortion, as does the surrounding plating, that gives us the oil-canning look. Those items (with the exception of the dead lights, induction grating, and emergency stern light which later get an even lighter shade of gray) are addressed with the dark dark gray of the hull.

          This masking around those items looks like a tedious and exacting task doesn't it?... and it was totally unnecessary! If was not such a dumb-ass at the beginning of the sail weathering job I would have masked these areas themselves before going through the above oil-canning process -- which would have been so, so much easier. One step forward, one step back. Duh!

          ​​​

          ​​​​​​​
          Resident Luddite

          Comment


          • Stepping back a bit to a previous picture. In the last thrilling, action packed, hair-raising installment I masked off those portions of the sail where oil-canning would not be evidenced. So, I applied the masking needed to paint the doors and other items the hull dark dark gray. Note the use of circular brass tube punches to cut discs out of masking tape. Very useful tools.



            Here's the raw oil-canning (not yet toned down) with the hand-hole access plates, doors and other stuff painted the dark dark gray and all masking removed. This is near the end-game of sail weathering before the toning down process.



            laying down the dark dark gray paint within the masks. Removed here for clarity is the use of post-it notes to provide shielding from over-spray as I shot paint onto the non-oil-canned portions of the sail.



            Removing the masking.



            One more shade of gray, a very light one, will be applied to the dead lights and emergency stern light lens. But, first, all that crass oil-canning work had to be toned down with careful mist coating of the entire sail structures with the dark dark gray. In this shot you have to squint real hard to make out the oil-canning -- and that's as it should be: weathering is at its best when it complements a display but does not distract from it. As they say: less is more.



            And, finally, the dead lights and emergency stern light lens are masked off and painted a light shade of gray, representing transparent structures. Post-it notes make for good, broad coverage masking elements -- their low-tack edge sticks to the work fine, but not to any degree of 'stick' that will damage the paint upon removal.



            At this point all that fragile acrylic paint work was protected with a heavy clear coat of ChromaClear. That product seen in the larger containers in background. Note the use of hemostat, handles, and machine vices to hold the smaller items as they sit under two infra-red lamps, those heat-sources used to accelerate the cure of the clear-coat.



            Enough SKIPJACK work. I'm sick of it! Moving on to that neat little 1/96 Type-21 project.

            Resident Luddite

            Comment


            • BEHOLD!



















































              David
              Resident Luddite

              Comment


              • One word... Incredible.

                Comment


                • You made fast and precise work of that task.

                  Was surprised to see the thickness of the hull was thinner than I had previously imagined for a printed hull. More like an injection molded hull. That SD is a perfect fit for this boat.

                  How many times have you accidentally depressed the Dremel spindle lock button while it was running? I know I have a half dozen times…

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Monahan Steam Models View Post
                    You made fast and precise work of that task.

                    Was surprised to see the thickness of the hull was thinner than I had previously imagined for a printed hull. More like an injection molded hull. That SD is a perfect fit for this boat.

                    How many times have you accidentally depressed the Dremel spindle lock button while it was running? I know I have a half dozen times…
                    Thirty-five frig'n thousandths!!!!! Scary thin.

                    I'm going to beef up the inside edges with some glass tape. Most injection formed kits are .050"-.85" wall. I think this was a resin print. And that plastic, whatever it is, has more positive characteristics than polystyrene or ABS.

                    Yeah, the "click-click-thud-thud-BANG" when you grab the running tool at the wrong spot. Scares the **** out me every time.

                    On this little beast the WTC will be shorter (won't need much ballast tank at all!) and the single motor will terminate in a gear-splitter.
                    ​​​​​​David

                    Resident Luddite

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
                      Thirty-five frig'n thousandths!!!!! Scary thin.

                      I'm going to beef up the inside edges with some glass tape. Most injection formed kits are .050"-.85" wall. I think this was a resin print. And that plastic, whatever it is, has more positive characteristics than polystyrene or ABS.

                      Yeah, the "click-click-thud-thud-BANG" when you grab the running tool at the wrong spot. Scares the **** out me every time.

                      On this little beast the WTC will be shorter (won't need much ballast tank at all!) and the single motor will terminate in a gear-splitter.
                      ​​​​​​David
                      That’s thin for sure.

                      Haha yup, “click-click-thud-thud-BANG” = sphincter clench!

                      It’s a great build you’re doing so far. Looking forward to seeing you work you magic with this one.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
                        On this little beast the WTC will be shorter
                        Space up front for a couple of 1/96 torpedo launcher?
                        Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

                        Comment


                        • I'm going to remember that way of cutting the hull. A big thank you David.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Monahan Steam Models View Post

                            That’s thin for sure.

                            Haha yup, “click-click-thud-thud-BANG” = sphincter clench!

                            It’s a great build you’re doing so far. Looking forward to seeing you work you magic with this one.
                            The model belongs to a fantastic target... er... surface ship builder, Joe Hoffman. I'm only r/c'ing the thing and will take it only as far as getting it to work reliably in the water. He takes the project from there.

                            David
                            Resident Luddite

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by SteveNeill View Post
                              I'm going to remember that way of cutting the hull. A big thank you David.
                              Thanks, Steve. Just passing it on.

                              David
                              Resident Luddite

                              Comment


                              • absolutely fantastic work on that split, David. wow.

                                Comment

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