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Moebius (Revell) Skipjack Build

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  • I don't know about weathering mine more.....I like the look of is and would not want to mess it up. That being said, and just in case someone dos not know, this sub was originally painted by David. Fortunately Rustoleum still has the same colors and they matched up well for the red on the hull and the darkest black used on the sub. I did find this photo of a Skipjack class sub still being worked on and tested out:

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    If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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    • Thank you, those are very kind words. I have no problem weathering. Just not sure what I will do on this boat yet. I have so much respect for David's work that doing anything major would feel like me painting on the Mona Lisa.
      If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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      • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named

        Weather that thing, Tom!
        Says the man with a shiny propellor on a weathered sub LOL

        I will do bird poop on the rudder, in honor of David.
        If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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        • Last major addition to the sub is lighting it. I originally was going to run the lights of the batteries in the sub, but got lazy/distracted what ever you call it, and decided to make a battery holder. It is printed in a tough material that flexes, so it is not brittle by any means. The wires run out of each end of the battery holder and a reed switch is installed on the positive end (doesn't matter what polarity it is installed on). At the bottom tf the picture is two magnet holders. One is far enough away for the reed switch not to be active (the off position or stowage) and the other holder keeps the magnet close enough for the reed switch to turn the lights on.

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          At minimum, I need to add bird poop on the rudder as a tribute to David (I promised I would) and at most full on weather this boat.
          If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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          • No flak here, at least from me. I have seen good weathering and some not so perfect. All are great because someone tried. How do you get better unless you try? right?
            I have weathered and clean subs, love them both. Now need to find reference photos of bird poop on rudders.......never thought I would every type that. LOL
            If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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            • Click image for larger version

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              Not a bird!
              If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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              • Thank you Rob and David!
                If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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                • Every submarine has (at least) one SPM. The exterior hull plate is mounted to the bottom of the motor like the pair in the attached picture, (from a skimmer) and the whole assembly is lowered, then turned as necessary to maneuver the ship.

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                  Last edited by CC Clarke; 08-29-2020, 05:31 PM.

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                  • Probably the most challenging aspect of integrating an SPM is applying an encoder-equipped motor that moves the SPM in azimuth but can be "homed" or indexed to a 000 position before retracting flush into the hull when no longer needed. A push-pull action via servo would work for lowering/retraction. Not an impossible job, but the devil is always in the details - like bow planes that fold down and then move in pitch.

                    Here's a shot of the working end of an SPM on the Henry Clay. It isn't framed well enough to show the hull fairing plate below the motor housing though. I made a 3D model of one and have it submerged deep in my 3D library somewhere - I can't remember the boat I used it for, but if I locate it, I'll post some renders.

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                    CC
                    Last edited by CC Clarke; 08-29-2020, 07:52 PM.

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                    • A few of us here are building 1/72 Harbour tugs with azi pods, instead of having 360deg movement like the real tugs we settled on 180 with reversible motors using servos that give 90deg either side (we used extended arms on the servo to give the extra travel). For a SPM you could use one of those tiny coreless motors with a small servo and tiny esc in fwd battery compartment.

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                      • Found some more SPM reference material for several US nukes. 726 Class has two, which look very close to the previous shot I posted based on the hull curvature. Since I couldn't find my old 3D model, I built another (688 Style) this afternoon.

                        CC

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                        • CC Clarke,

                          Your photos are really great for explaining how these SPM's actually function! And if someone were to feel they could add these to a Submarine build the photos would be a great help! Thank you for sharing your knowledge and putting this information up!

                          Rob

                          "Firemen can stand the heat"

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