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3D Printer

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  • #46
    I spent about five minutes sanding micro-blobs off a couple of parts. The layer lines from my printer are barely visible for properly oriented parts, but a thin coating of XTC-3D leaves the rivet detail visible. Total print time was less than 72 hours. My next iteration of it will have the two top and bottom sections (11" when joined) printed as single parts.

    Here's a proto 688 display base that has a few more details to go. I changed the pylon structure (there are two configurations I know of) to reflect the earlier 70's style. Those are definitely meant for resin printing.

    CC
    Attached Files
    Last edited by CC Clarke; 01-09-2021, 09:37 AM.

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    • #47
      Where I've been using 3d printed items in models, I use them as masters to cast a tool from. The parts invariably look fine from the printer, until you start to sand and then hit them with some primer- shows up all sorts of nasties which require attention. I tend to use methods I would use for hand worked parts- polyester fillers and air dry spot putty and careful hand sanding, followed by filler primers- rinse and repeat until item is considered satisfactory for the moulding from.

      I would expect adding a thickened epoxy resin to a printed item would soften detail to some extent.
      DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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      • #48
        Which is why thin coats are applied; the viscosity can be adjusted by tweaking the ratio of the two-part liquids to some extent. The DSRV for example, is covered with hundreds of rivets, which are modeled with enough height to remain raised above the XTC-3D epoxy. Where the product really shined was covering joined seam lines that were slightly below the surface. It sands very easily.

        I don't think this product is necessarily a one-stop solution to all surfacing work - it's just another tool among many, and I haven't seen anyone use or review it here on 3D printed models yet. And so I did.

        Last summer, I performed an experiment using PLA to determine the optimum width, depth, and spacing inscribed details could be maintained after sanding using different grits of sandpaper. The test was conducted on a flat plane, 3mm thick. Heat from friction being the biggest detriment, wet sanding produced the best results.

        The single best tip I can offer is there is no substitute for a properly designed 3D model to reduce the post-print finishing work. (That, and a 3D printer that produces acceptable prints.)

        The DSRV model I provided in the link above is a prime example. Where the upper and lower hulls snap together, there is a longitudinal overhang that covers the seam. The bow and stern are sectioned where the flanges meet, so any seam contributes to the detail. With the exception of the three-bladed screw, the model is designed with no need for support structure, (though you can add them via your slicer if desired) which speeds up printing and reduces any sanding required where the supports may leave residue on the surface. The hull is smooth because care was taken to keep the number of polygons on the sides to a level that shows no faceting during the conversion from the native CAD file (Fusion 360) to STL.

        His other models exhibit this attention to detail and are excellent examples for anyone wishing to learn how to add features to their designs that add function while retaining form.

        Carl's other submarine designs can be found here: Designs - Thingiverse
        Last edited by CC Clarke; 01-10-2021, 09:01 AM.

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        • #49
          Fusion 360 enables you to output a model at very high resolution, so i never find an issue with blocky faces.
          DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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          • #50
            Obviously you've mastered the resolution settings discussed in post 37. Do you have any other tips in Fusion 360 for new users to get the most out of their 3D prints?

            Are you using the free version or the more capable paid/subscription version?

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            • #51
              I'm using the educators license- I have to mentor people at work from time to time, that makes me an educator of sorts IMO.

              I just click on the body I want to print and select 'Save as STL' then select the high refinement option. e.g.

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              DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Subculture View Post
                I'm using the educators license- I have to mentor people at work from time to time, that makes me an educator of sorts IMO.

                I just click on the body I want to print and select 'Save as STL' then select the high refinement option. e.g.

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                That is what I did too. The latest part on my Columbia class boat was much less faceted as a result.

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                Last edited by RCJetDude; 01-11-2021, 06:39 PM.

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                • #53
                  Well today while working on my HL Hunley project! My big 6 year old ANYCUBIC Predator took a dump! The extruder and the hot head all went at the same time. Replaced the head with a spare from another parted out printer I had. Parts for the Predator are not to be found. went to Anycubic China, and they where sold out. Amazon used to sell parts for that model, but they did not have the exact extruder. I decided to order one that was close and started tearing things apart to build one that might or might not work.

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                  Well now to put it all back together and hope!!

                  I have been looking for a reason to purchase a new DREMEL 3D45 printer!! (So In a way I hope it does not work)

                  Rob
                  "Firemen can stand the heat"
                  "Perfection is our goal. Excellence will be tolerated"

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                  • #54
                    All is well with the Predator!!!

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                    Perfect test print!!:-))
                    Now back to the Hunley project.

                    Rob
                    "Firemen can stand the heat"
                    "Perfection is our goal. Excellence will be tolerated"

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