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Most Common Electrical Connector Used In R.C Submarines

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  • Most Common Electrical Connector Used In R.C Submarines

    Hello
    Like the title says. I was wondering What the Most Common electrical connector is that is used to make electrical connections in R.C submarine electrical systems? I know of direct hard soldering but what is the most common connector used and why?
    Thanks in advance for your replies.
    George

  • #2
    I'll narrow the answer to connectors not used between receiver and devices.

    In the early days it was the white Tamia connector.


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    Today, it's a Deans connector. There were and are variances as the American market is a fraction of the whole.

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    And for bonus points here is a shots of r/c system connectors made up between receiver and various devices, familiar and strange.

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    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank You for your reply and lessons. Question about Deans connectors. How do you know if you have the real Deans connector or a cheap fake one from china? I heard from some speed racers friends that there a lot of fake Deans out there and they fail frequently on them.
      Is that an issue for R.C sub use OR is it because the racers draw such Large current demands on the Lipos that the fake Deans melt under load???

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by george View Post
        Thank You for your reply and lessons. Question about Deans connectors. How do you know if you have the real Deans connector or a cheap fake one from china? I heard from some speed racers friends that there a lot of fake Deans out there and they fail frequently on them.
        Is that an issue for R.C sub use OR is it because the racers draw such Large current demands on the Lipos that the fake Deans melt under load???
        To me they're all the same. I'm not trying to light New York with these things.

        David
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

        Comment


        • #5
          Ah O.K then. Thanks for the lessons and your time.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sorry for got to ask you about your small servos. Are they metal geared OR nylon geared?

            Comment


            • #7
              Some additional input on this. I also use mini-Deans (which are about half the size of traditional Deans), and XT-60 and XT-30. All are great connectors.

              The standard servos in our Subdrivers are nylon gear.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the update.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Worse connector setup, old Airtronics servo connection, have the power wires in opposite of everybody.

                  In the old days the racers just solder the connection.

                  if the connector turns black, something goes wrong with the system.
                  convince! stick with your setup. Little Dielectric grease on the contact goes a long way.
                  I still have some dean's connector , 100% makes in china. Wants some .

                  still don't get this, war story,
                  people managed to push in xt60 connector the wrong way. Never on a Dean's.

                  Got some stash of xt60, I could spare some, let me know.

                  Comment

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