3d cad files for subs

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  • biggsgolf
    Captain
    • Jan 2020
    • 759

    3d cad files for subs

    How are 3D CAD Files for Subs created?

  • Subculture
    Admiral
    • Feb 2009
    • 2161

    #2
    Depends on the software used and the type of boat you’re trying to model. A symmetrical hull of revolution is far easier than say a Type VII boat.

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    • biggsgolf
      Captain
      • Jan 2020
      • 759

      #3
      Originally posted by Subculture
      Depends on the software used and the type of boat you’re trying to model. A symmetrical hull of revolution is far easier than say a Type VII boat.
      Which Software's are the most intuitive and preferred? I may take a stab at it if I can get my head around it

      Comment

      • CC Clarke
        Commander
        • Aug 2020
        • 253

        #4
        A 3D modeling/CAD program is used to define the desired shape.

        Once the 3D shape is created, the modeling program saves it in a compatible format for a Printer's 3D slicing software. Slicing software turns the 3D shape code into a 3D printer-friendly format that defines the printed shape for the printer to create.

        There are two types of modeling: Hard Surface and Organic.

        A 3D extruded disk with a hole in the center would be a hard surface 3D example of a washer.
        A human face model would be an example of an organic surface. Both types of modeling require a different skill set.

        Modeling requires learning the workflow of the software and gaining enough experience to create desired the 3D shapes efficiently and quickly.

        There are two (general) types of printers: Resin and FDM.

        Resin can produce a nearly flawless surface with sub-50 micron detail. It is messy to work with when cleaning freshly-printed parts.

        FDM printing uses melted plastic filament. It gives poor detail with heavy layer lines that must be sanded and filled to remove. It prints relatively fast, and the printer can be quickly turned around to begin printing another part.

        Slicing conversion is automatic, and for FDM printing, easy to set up. Resin printing has a steeper learning curve to get the best quality prints when setting up supports and proper part angles but once you get the hang of it, (through multiple failures) it isn't difficult to configure.

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        • Subculture
          Admiral
          • Feb 2009
          • 2161

          #5
          Originally posted by biggsgolf

          Which Software's are the most intuitive and preferred?
          One of those questions where ten different people will give ten different answers.

          I'm no expert in this, but what I would say is start small.

          I like Fusion 360, which is free for hobbyists with a few limitations (which are unlikely to bother you), there are tons of free online tutorials for this software. Other free alternatives I've tried are Onshape, Freecad, Tinkercad and DesignSpark Mechanical.

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          • CAPTDD547
            Ensign
            • Jun 2024
            • 1

            #6
            I am not a technical expert but an engineering friend of mine suggested Fusion 360. Fusion 360 is free and is reasonably easy to learn with lots of videos to assist. Combined with the Bambu P1S I have had no issues designing and printing.

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            • CC Clarke
              Commander
              • Aug 2020
              • 253

              #7
              There is no substitute for butt-in-seat training; YouTube videos can only take you so far and the journey is much longer. After years of wrangling polygons, I am still learning new workflows. It never ends. It all depends on what your goals are. Simple operations can be picked up fairly quickly, but you have to crawl, walk, and run before you can tackle anything. Too often, beginners on CAD and Modeling forums set their goals far too high without the requisite skill set and eventually give up. The bottom of the Learning Curve is the hardest part, and without continuing successes, it's easy to get frustrated and quit.

              One of the best ways to learn a CAD or Modeling app is to take classes. Fusion 360 is often taught in community colleges and the prices are reasonable.

              I spent 6 months trying the online route and it was nearly impossible to learn the correct workflow to create what I was after, because everyone solves challenges differently. (And like math, there are many ways to get to the same result, but knowing all of the techniques gives one options.) Six months of training, with nothing but modeling assignments changed everything. As the instructor said on the first day, "I'm going to teach you more in a month than you can learn on your own in a year." He kept his promise. He also produced hundreds of short videos, and we used them to reinforce his lesson plans, but the feedback on my work by the students, (everyone critiqued your homework on the big screen each morning) and instructor was invaluable.

              For those who cannot access formal training, it helps to pair up with someone to keep motivated when frustration sets in. -Especially when a video leads you to a dead-end and you can't figure out what went wrong. We've all been there. The difference is how much sweat equity you're willing to invest for something that can take years to master, if your desire is to build objects of increasing complexity.

              That being said, if all you're after are simple geometric shapes to create less complex objects, there are many free programs and videos to get you started. For everything else, there's MasterCard.

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