Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and expectations

Hello, and welcome to the forums at the Nautilus Drydocks, formerly Sub-driver.com!

We welcome anyone with a passion for submarines and a desire to learn and share knowledge about this fascinating hobby. Use of these forums indicates your intention to abide by our code of conduct:


1. No spam. All automated messages, advertisements, and links to competitor websites will be deleted immediately.

2. Please post in relevant sub-forums only. Messages posted in the wrong topic area will be removed and placed in the correct sub-forum by moderators.

3. Respect other users. No flaming or abusing fellow forum members. Users who continue to post inflammatory, abusive comments will be deleted from the forum after or without a warning.

4. No threats or harassment of other users will be tolerated. Any instance of threatening or harassing behavior is grounds for deletion from the forums.

5. No profanity or pornography is allowed. Posts containing adult material will be deleted.

6. No re-posting of copyrighted materials or other illegal content is allowed. Any posts containing illegal content or copyrighted materials will be deleted.
See more
See less

“Sub” Ed’s “no-mar” bungee tie down!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • “Sub” Ed’s “no-mar” bungee tie down!

    We all have our different ways of doing things, some we like that are borrowed from others, some we invent from necessity. That’s what makes this hobby such a joy for me, there are a million way’s to choose from for a particular task. Choosing those options creates one’s style. Boy, I got style! Class however, is something else…..

    I tend NOT to transport my running models to and from the running site on their display stand. For that I have a transport stand, which doubles for as the working stand (her “drydock”). Therefore I’m never have to worry about its condition as I am the models condition itself. Generally it’s just a piece of 1 by ‘what-ever’ ply or pine board that has a couple of pieces of SCH40 PVC pipe with piping insulation adhered to it.

    The “by what-ever” x-y dimensions generally exceeds the boats LOA and max beam by 2” either side/end. This way as I maneuver around I’ll chance bumping that rather than taking off a control surface or whacking the Admiral with a sharp screw blade. Also, as they are transported in the bed of my F150, which has a rubber non-skid mat anyway, should they slide into each other, or forward due to collision avoidance/SCPD evasion maneuvering (a required skill on Lawnguyland’s famed LIE), no damage occurs. At least not in the past 30 years I‘ve been doing this. In an instance with large enough truck damage to do something to the boats and I’ll have bigger issues.

    Two screw eye’s fwd, two aft, and each set a bungee is usually sufficient for even my largest models. Also with the large models, it’s easy enough of course to acquire rubber bungees, or cover the fabric ones with more of that pipe insulation as to not mar the finish of the boat. Works great on nuc boats w/o railings.

    But with the smaller boats, or large ones with delicate deck detail like railings, I make my own custom ones using the ubiquitous blue silicone fuel tubing many of us hobbyists know about. Heck, I use it in so many applications I purchase by the spool!

    First, I remove the hooks from old, small, fabric bungees. Then all you need is the appropriately sized Silicone tubing (can fit into the retaining end of the hook), in this case ID. Two short piece of rigid plastic rod/tube with an OD between the ID and OD of silicone tube to act as a stop. I this example a 3/16” od x 1/8” blue PVC tube (repurposed from a 16AWG Butt connector). Finally for “belt and suspenders”, good old GE silly-cone.

    Tools needed: a simple razor blade, and for the accident prone like myself you can opt for a tubing cutter if the stop is a plastic, or even brass tube. Another nice thing to have to insert the stop is a set of small, round nose pliers if it’s a tube. But you can grunt it in with your fingers if needed.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20191211_1.jpg
Views:	132
Size:	61.5 KB
ID:	135390
    Click image for larger version

Name:	20191211_2.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	61.8 KB
ID:	135391

    Here I am inserting the stop. Just watch your “Order of Operations”. In my enthusiasm to take notes and photgraph doing this, I accidently put the sop in FIRST before sliding on the hook. Lucky only one side was done. But they can be worked out if needed.

    That’s why a squirt of GE filling past the stop (if it’s a tube) is a good “belt and suspenders” idea. Silicone adheres quite well to itself lol. Be patient and let it cure!


    Click image for larger version

Name:	20191211_3.jpg
Views:	84
Size:	61.2 KB
ID:	135392


    Click image for larger version

Name:	20191211_4.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	59.0 KB
ID:	135393

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20191211_5.jpg
Views:	86
Size:	57.7 KB
ID:	135394

    So here it is on holding my ALPHA 21 on its transport board. Easy-peasy-lemon squeezy. And it won’t hurt the finish like the standard fabric shock cord ones began to do.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20191211_6.jpg
Views:	74
Size:	61.3 KB
ID:	135395
    Click image for larger version

Name:	20191211_7.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	57.7 KB
ID:	135396


    As I stated way back up there, I’m sure there are as many way’s to do this as there are RC Submariners out there. But I was bored one Saturday and didn’t feel like giving “small rubber bungees” a Goog’ after seeing the fabric mar the paint. So whipped these puppies up and I’m happy with the result.

    I got even more bored during lunch at work today and decided to share it overly written tip with my RC Shipmates.

    Personally, I’d like to see more “TIPS’N TRICKS posted here. They are what make this hobby extra fun. I’m sure there are as many out there as there are users on this forum. So share!

    As always, may all your surfacing’s equal your dives!

    v/r "Sub" Ed

    Silent Service "Cold War" Veteran (The good years!)
    NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.
    USS ULYSSES S GRANT-USS SHARK-USS NAUTILUS-USS KEY WEST-USS BLUEBACK-USS PATRICK HENRY-K432-U25-SSRN SEAVIEW-PROTEUS-NAUTILUS

  • #2
    For long-term storage and transport to and from the lake I prefer a proper 'box':



















    David

    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
      For long-term storage and transport to and from the lake I prefer a proper 'box':
      Click image for larger version

Name:	005-homer-simpson-drooling.png
Views:	84
Size:	24.9 KB
ID:	135430

      v/r "Sub" Ed

      Silent Service "Cold War" Veteran (The good years!)
      NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.
      USS ULYSSES S GRANT-USS SHARK-USS NAUTILUS-USS KEY WEST-USS BLUEBACK-USS PATRICK HENRY-K432-U25-SSRN SEAVIEW-PROTEUS-NAUTILUS

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by QuarterMaster View Post
        Click image for larger version

Name:	005-homer-simpson-drooling.png
Views:	84
Size:	24.9 KB
ID:	135430
        Well … **** you very much, Ed!

        David
        The Horrible
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

        Comment


        • #5
          Ed, great tip, one I will try to remember.
          If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

            Well … **** you very much, Ed!

            David
            The Horrible
            I see Dave is alive and kicking. I’m back after a long, years, vacation.
            Casey

            Comment

            Working...
            X