How are 3D printed parts holding up

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  • redboat219
    Admiral
    • Dec 2008
    • 2881

    How are 3D printed parts holding up

    In 2021 I asked how resilient are 3D printed parts or hulls compared to injection molded plastic kits and GRP kits. Most answered of comparable strength, rigid, lightweight.

    What I want to know is how are these 3D printed parts holding up after 2 years.
    Make it simple, make strong, make it work!
  • rwtdiver
    Vice Admiral
    • Feb 2019
    • 1823

    #2
    Romel,

    The photos below are two boats (1:96 Scale British Astute and the 1:96 Scale French Redoutable) 3D printed PLA Are both about 3.5 years old.

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    My boats only get run in our pool and only the Fall and Winter time here in Arizona. Summers are just way to hot for PLA boats. They both have been in the pool (chlorinated) 12 to 15 times over that 3.5 years time.

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat."

    Comment

    • redboat219
      Admiral
      • Dec 2008
      • 2881

      #3
      Rob,
      No cracking, delamination or sagging? That's good to hear.
      Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

      Comment

      • tifosi12
        Commander
        • Jul 2020
        • 378

        #4
        They do well, just don't let them inside the car on the back seat while parked in the sun.

        Comment

        • Marylandradiosailor
          Lieutenant, Junior Grade
          • Nov 2021
          • 35

          #5
          I have been thinking of coating the inside of my PLA hulls with a layer(s) of heat resistant epoxy resin to stabilize for the hot sun? Has anyone tried this or have thoughts? thx. (I can only transport my large hulls in a transport box in the bed of my pickup truck and concerned about the heat) Khim

          Comment

          • He Who Shall Not Be Named
            Moderator
            • Aug 2008
            • 12503

            #6
            Originally posted by Marylandradiosailor
            I have been thinking of coating the inside of my PLA hulls with a layer(s) of heat resistant epoxy resin to stabilize for the hot sun? Has anyone tried this or have thoughts? thx. (I can only transport my large hulls in a transport box in the bed of my pickup truck and concerned about the heat) Khim
            Cover your box with a thermal (silvered on the sun-side) blanket. I would investigate the thermal expansion/contraction rates of the substrate and your epoxy coating -- if they are not close together, you'll shed some of that epoxy over time and heating/cooling cycles.
            Who is John Galt?

            Comment

            • Marylandradiosailor
              Lieutenant, Junior Grade
              • Nov 2021
              • 35

              #7
              good ideas thx.

              Comment

              • Subculture
                Admiral
                • Feb 2009
                • 2168

                #8
                With FDM printing the process means parts are anisotropic​, and as subs tend to be printed with the layers running across the sub, they will be weakest lengthwise. I find FDM 3d parts are reasonably tough, but not as strong as plastic moulded parts and certainly not as strong as GRP. However they are tough enough for most uses, and with some careful techniques, the parts can be strengthened considerably if you feel it's needed.

                Comment

                • rwtdiver
                  Vice Admiral
                  • Feb 2019
                  • 1823

                  #9
                  Originally posted by Subculture
                  With FDM printing the process means parts are anisotropic​, and as subs tend to be printed with the layers running across the sub, they will be weakest lengthwise. I find FDM 3d parts are reasonably tough, but not as strong as plastic moulded parts and certainly not as strong as GRP. However they are tough enough for most uses, and with some careful techniques, the parts can be strengthened considerably if you feel it's needed.
                  Very well stated subculture!

                  I certainly do not want to say that 3D printing in PLA is anywhere near as good as plastic molded submarine hulls! For my application (pool use only) and very little run times, it has been a good choice as far as building goes.

                  Rob
                  "Firemen can stand the heat."

                  Comment

                  • Wizzard033
                    Lieutenant, Junior Grade
                    • Sep 2023
                    • 41

                    #10
                    I planned to use thinned epoxy to seal and stabilize the outside of my hull and epoxy w/2oz cloth inside my 1:48 type VII C.

                    Comment

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