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Color of scrificial anodes...

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  • Color of scrificial anodes...

    I have a question about the correct color of zinc anodes. On pictures I've noticed, that anodes in use have a more or less white appearance due to the zinc oxide being white. So I thought about giving a white gray base color with aluminum accents. What do you think? Any opinions?




  • #2
    Anodes start out a medium grey and slowly turn white as they disintegrate.
    The texture goes from smooth when new to lumpy as they age.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by CC Clarke View Post
      Anodes start out a medium grey and slowly turn white as they disintegrate.
      The texture goes from smooth when new to lumpy as they age.
      That's correct. On my models I made the Anodes out of white styrene, cut notches in the thin strip and glue down Paint them to the hull surrounding color & scrape
      the paint off the tops exposing the bare sheet styrene. Then I give the hull a clear flat coat over everything. Less is more an looks realistic Merriman taught me!

      Steve​




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      Last edited by Albacore 569; 03-25-2023, 05:32 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DrSchmidt View Post
        I have a question about the correct color of zinc anodes. On pictures I've noticed, that anodes in use have a more or less white appearance due to the zinc oxide being white. So I thought about giving a white gray base color with aluminum accents. What do you think? Any opinions?



        Even fresh off the pallet zincs are already oxidized white. Put them on the model and don't worry about what color they pick up. Only after painting is done do you hand-brush them a very, very light splotched gray. The metal tabs (welded or bolted to the hull) get only a suggestion of rust.





















        As a Diver I did a lot of zinc inspection and replacement. Never did I see any 'silver' to those items.





        David
        Who is John Galt?

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        • #5
          Funny, but a lot of the zincs pictured above are missing their bolt holes! An extra detail that makes them pop. I do them by making the strips as Steve described, drilling for the holes, adhering to the hull, then painting the hull. After the paint is dry, I carefully scratch off the color and dry-brush a light gray, leaving some white exposed until I get the desired look. BTW, the zincs on the 1/72 Skipjack kits are completely wrong! Wrong shape, wrong size, wrong type!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wlambing View Post
            Funny, but a lot of the zincs pictured above are missing their bolt holes! An extra detail that makes them pop. I do them by making the strips as Steve described, drilling for the holes, adhering to the hull, then painting the hull. After the paint is dry, I carefully scratch off the color and dry-brush a light gray, leaving some white exposed until I get the desired look. BTW, the zincs on the 1/72 Skipjack kits are completely wrong! Wrong shape, wrong size, wrong type!
            How's this, Bill?















            Based on your observations regarding the flawed 1/72 Moebius SKIPJACK kit: An angry letter of correction has been sent to that firm recommending the identification and brutal killing of whoever designed that kit.

            Further: notification of this travesty against the entire kit-assembling community has been forwarded to the SC leadership, suggesting that this individual's name be obliterated from the SubCommittee 'wall of honor' and his name stricken from all association documents, past and present. For the sake of the planet and little children, we must render that individual persona non grata, immediately!

            Thank you for your kind attention. The world will now be a happier place.

            Karen


            Who is John Galt?

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            • #7

              Some zinc blocks are also mounted on the inner walls of the submarine's pressure-resistant compartments. The Soviet Project 941 submarine, a seawater-drinking monster, had a unique arrangement of pressure-resistant tanks that gave it extraordinarily large reserve buoyancy, requiring it to swallow seawater almost equal to its own weight to dive. Zinc blocks are more active than iron, helping to mitigate the corrosion of steel by seawater.
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              Last edited by Sam Victory; 03-26-2023, 01:58 PM.

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              • #8
                US submarine zincs have had many shapes over the years., with the bar zinc being the most common for the last forty-plus. These have holes at each end, mounted to studs on the mounting location.

                Buy your own, (with measurements included) here: M12 - MARSHALL 3" x 12" x 1-1/4" zinc submarine-slab Navy type anode. 12lbs. Sold per each. | Item Detail | Paxton Company‚Äč

                CC

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                • #9
                  Zinc anodes are everywhere!!!! Slabs, bars, circle, pencil, rods, pucks, you name it!!! Yes, David, those bars with the bolt holes are a thing of beauty!!! Basically, anywhere you can have exposure to sea water, there is a zinc anode. Inside system components (heat exchangers), bilges, in tanks, inside superstructure, outside superstructure, everywhere! Zincs are the submariner's friend!!

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                  • #10
                    That's what I made of it....whire gray as base color, steel accents (I know, nothing shiny), toned down with gray and white washes.

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                    • #11
                      I had wondered what those bars were! Nice work Herr Doktor! Makes so much more sense now, and looks really good, to boot!

                      Take care,

                      Bill

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                      • #12
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ID:	170443Click image for larger version  Name:	pVGo14K.jpg Views:	0 Size:	54.7 KB ID:	170442Photos years ago of USS Dolphin AGSS -555 in drydock in San Diego Ca. Click image for larger version  Name:	7kWOyjD.jpg Views:	0 Size:	51.8 KB ID:	170439Click image for larger version  Name:	T2f5LZ3.jpg Views:	0 Size:	48.2 KB ID:	170441Click image for larger version  Name:	D9cfLGV.jpg Views:	0 Size:	59.2 KB ID:	170440
                        Last edited by Albacore 569; 04-02-2023, 08:18 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Nice, Steve! Standard 12"X6"X1-1/4" USN zinc anodes. An excellent example of the aging found after a number of months submerged.

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