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Newbie & ;Motor Question

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  • Newbie & ;Motor Question

    My question is what drive motor and esc would be used for a 1:48 class (88 inches long) Seawolf.

    Thank-you
    Last edited by substandard; 06-26-2020, 08:26 PM.

  • #2
    Start smaller. Maybe adapting a plastic model kit, the 1/144 Trumpeter SEAWOLF and SD would be my recommendation. Crawl, walk, jog, only after all that, run.

    David
    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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    • #3
      Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
      Start smaller. Maybe adapting a plastic model kit, the 1/144 Trumpeter SEAWOLF and SD would be my recommendation. Crawl, walk, jog, only after all that, run.

      David
      substandard,

      You need to pay SPECIAL attention to what David M, and others on this blog are saying! I am also just getting started. I have over 40 years in building and flying all kinds of aircraft. I am here to tell you some of that experience is helpful, but Submarines are a whole different world! So take my advice, listen to David and start small and easy! Good luck, and welcome to this new CHALLENGING hobby!

      Rob

      "Firemen can stand the heat"

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      • #4
        Could be you know what you’re doing and or have building experience already...

        Assuming this, the motor selection is a function of propeller diameter and configuration, particularly the number of blades and the pitch of them. For something that big, I’d go huge brushed motor at around 5000 to 7000 rpm direct drive. Raid the auto parts bins for used electric fan motors...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SubHuman View Post
          Could be you know what you’re doing and or have building experience already...
          ..
          Thanks so much for exactly answering my question; I appreciate it!.
          Yes Its a long story; but I have been building stuff all my life. Starting when I was 10 years old building custom homes with my dad.
          College degree in EE. Done electronics hardware work, board repair - chip chasing, logic analyzers scopes etc, computer programming,
          Now work as a technical architect (architects build stuff; but on paper ;-)
          .
          Have done glass layups, built and flown RC planes, & Rc Heli. Carpet track RC cars....

          I appreciate the insight that someone said to start small. But if I have to work on 28" x 3" cigar I won't last.

          I do understand how these magnificent models work ... or at least I think I do ;-0
          I understand some think smaller might be better to start but bigger is more more realistic; Looks much better when moving.
          Easier to work on with these big hands.
          Plus I want to see if I can do a sizable glass layup and get her smooth as a babies bottom.
          I bet there are similar problems to overcome with smaller subs too.
          But I do enough fiddley small stuff when staring at a laptop at work all day.

          so that's a little about me, looking forward to working/playing with you guys.
          ./thanks for the replies


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          • #6
            Well then, big it is! Welcome and I think you might have the stuff to make it work.
            There was a saying that the motor can should be the same as the diameter of your prop. I do not know how tried and true that is especially when I have seen big props from smaller motors. Brushless has the umph to move a bigger prop. At the rate we run (not putting water skis under our subs) and gearing, that rule might be cut 25% - 50%. Hold this information with open hands, others with more experience may have better insight.
            Peace,
            Tom
            If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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