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How woul d you make the smallest SD that is reasonably possible?

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  • How woul d you make the smallest SD that is reasonably possible?

    This is mostly meant to be a thought exercise, but I am genuinely curious what the best way is to make a very small, static dive-able, sub-driver. When I finally finish my Skipjack build, it is probably mostly going to get run in a swimming pool, but I am thinking that it is already a bit on the large size for my normal size pool. I figure there is a fun challenge to be had in making a much smaller sub to see what can be achieved in the way of performance. Like depth limits, speed under water, maneuverability under water, etc. A real small sub-driver that is not crazy hard to build would be useful for such a thing.

    I'm sure I'll have better ideas of my own once I have started using the Skipjack with its Dave M. sub-driver, but I like reading and learning from all you folk as well!

    Some great projects in this forum! Fun to read.

    -Ben

  • #2
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    One inch tube - never again! That was an exercise in frustration and packing stuff in a small area.
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    If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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    • #3
      https://youtu.be/3m9EdSLo6SM

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      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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      • #4


        Amazing. It is going to take some time for me to digest these! Are any of these SD units still available? How well did they work? As the subs get smaller (props, surfaces, etc) I am curious how performance suffered or not.

        Thanks for the quick replies!

        (edit: Sorry! I just noticed the youtube link and am watching it now)

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        • #5
          Dave, that is some very impressive work. Your sub drivers have always amazed me, ever since I first saw them in action in Groton back in 1996 or so. I was hooked then, but too young to have the resources to put behind building a sub!

          What did you like/dislike about these designs?

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          • #6
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            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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            • #7
              I love that size. I'm going to have to take a look for one of these Revell Skipjacks. Dave, I think you have some sort of inner-watchmaker trying to find his way out of you! I love your innovation and craftsmanship, always have.

              So it looks like a crafty rare earth magnet interface for the dive planes, coupled through some sort of thin cover over the servo bay? Very innovative. I assume you were satisfied with the amount of force the magnets could sustain before disengaging.
              Last edited by ben1272; 05-17-2020, 06:44 PM.

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              • #8
                Also have a look at some of the tiny SD made by Zhuravlik.

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                This thing has a working blast system. They also make a much smaller one which is around four inches long; also with a working balst system.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ben1272 View Post
                  I love that size. I'm going to have to take a look for one of these Revell Skipjacks. Dave, I think you have some sort of inner-watchmaker trying to find his way out of you! I love your innovation and craftsmanship, always have.

                  So it looks like a crafty rare earth magnet interface for the dive planes, coupled through some sort of thin cover over the servo bay? Very innovative. I assume you were satisfied with the amount of force the magnets could sustain before disengaging.
                  Watch-makers empty my privy!

                  Yes, as the inverse square law is not our friend it is vital to make the stand-off distance between the two magnets as short as possible. But, yes, this means of linkage has been most effective for the smaller models.

                  I illustrate my magnificence:


















                  "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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                  • #10
                    This broiught back some fond memories of cramming those tinly little servos into tubes and THEN discovering that when you cut the mounting ears of the little basyards they STOP working. I see your work around for that. Made me laught to think how long it took me to figure it out.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by HardRock View Post
                      This broiught back some fond memories of cramming those tinly little servos into tubes and THEN discovering that when you cut the mounting ears of the little basyards they STOP working. I see your work around for that. Made me laught to think how long it took me to figure it out.

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                      Would it have killed that lousy PCB designer to keep the circuit runs away from the mounting tabs???!!!! Idiots!

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                      David
                      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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                      • #12
                        Or use the hull itself as the SD,

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                        The Biber can be splitted at the stern, she is secured watertight with some RTV as a seal, it can dive by speed, which does it remarkeble well.

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                        Pretty much the same story as the Biber, this Marder is also sealed by RTV at the rear-end and the frontcaps, surface runner only but fun to drive at that scale.

                        Manfred.
                        Fertig zum unterwasser.

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                        • #13
                          Dave...I am in even more awe than I had been in previously marveling at your 'conventional' sub-drivers and craftsmanship. These are truly gems and I am in love with that magnet concept. I hope I get the chance to try and make something like this.

                          Thanks for taking the time to post all these photos. I know it is a pain, and I appreciate it!

                          -Ben

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                          • #14
                            Manfred, that is an interesting mini sub specimen. Do you have any photos of its insides? :)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ben1272 View Post
                              Dave...I am in even more awe than I had been in previously marveling at your 'conventional' sub-drivers and craftsmanship. These are truly gems and I am in love with that magnet concept. I hope I get the chance to try and make something like this.

                              Thanks for taking the time to post all these photos. I know it is a pain, and I appreciate it!

                              -Ben
                              My pleasure … if you do something with it!

                              David
                              "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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