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A mini lathe

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  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by Kazzer View Post

    Yuk! Sounds like an appointment here is needed! https://youtu.be/fLzF0PTrwE4
    Tried. Security won't let me into the place.

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • Kazzer
    replied
    Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
    OSHA can kiss my fat, pimple-encrusted, diabetic ass!

    David
    Yuk! Sounds like an appointment here is needed! https://youtu.be/fLzF0PTrwE4

    Leave a comment:


  • george
    replied
    Ah
    Thanks again for the lessons O wise one. I think I got enough for now.

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by george View Post
    Thanks for ALL the tips. Without taking apart a drill, how do you check for tight bearings?
    With the power cord removed from the wall socket … grab the spindle and shake it laterally. If it rattles, you have bum bearing(s).

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • george
    replied
    Thanks for ALL the tips. Without taking apart a drill, how do you check for tight bearings?

    Leave a comment:


  • Subculture
    replied
    Only the cross feed screw had any appreciable wear, as the machine was primarily used for facing operations. A machine like this will last for generations in a home workshop.

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by Subculture View Post
    $69? Paid about that for this one. Almost thirty years ago mind.



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    You're killing me, Andy! What a beauty! As long as you can still tighten the gibs who cares how shop worn that best is.

    David

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  • Subculture
    replied
    $69? Paid about that for this one. Almost thirty years ago mind.



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  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by george View Post
    ah
    Thanks Again for the lessons. "Make sure bearing is tight"?????? Sorry do not know what you refer to.

    The spindle the chuck is attached to; or, if you will, the shaft that leads from the motor/belt pulley down to the chuck. The spindle/shaft Is usually supported by one or two roller/ball bearings (or a big Oilite in cheaper units). If, over time, and/or hard use, ware increases the non-interference fit between bearing and spindle/shaft, it will cause the work to vibrate laterally to the tool pressed against the work. Setting up -- under the right conditions of load, feed-speed, tool pressure and angle, and RPM -- a resonate vibration that will evidence on the work as 'wavy' lines. Chattering. Change any one of the variables and you alter the amount of vibration. Tight bearings mitigate all this happy horse-****.

    Loose bearings breed vibrations. Duh!

    Don't make me come over there!

    David
    Last edited by He Who Shall Not Be Named; 12-03-2019, 05:28 AM.

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  • george
    replied
    ah
    Thanks Again for the lessons. "Make sure bearing is tight"?????? Sorry do not know what you refer to.

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by george View Post
    Get it Be Dam Careful BUT can be done. I see, said the blind man to his deaf wife.

    Your drill being used, the chuck 3/8" or 1/2" ? Is one better than the other, why?

    My mind has a brain cramp, the device that controls the power/speed is called?
    3/8" chuck. Tapered shank. Make sure the bearing is tight.

    Dremel AC speed controller. A generic version is also sold by Harbor Freight. And buy the foot-switch -- makes life easier.

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • george
    replied
    Get it Be Dam Careful BUT can be done. I see, said the blind man to his deaf wife.

    Your drill being used, the chuck 3/8" or 1/2" ? Is one better than the other, why?

    My mind has a brain cramp, the device that controls the power/speed is called?

    Leave a comment:


  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Slow speed, very soft metal (white-metal, machine brass, etc.), sharp tool, tool rest right up against the work. Band-aids at the ready! When work is completed, inventory fingers. OSHA can kiss my fat, pimple-encrusted, diabetic ass!

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • george
    replied
    WOW!!! I have to ask though, for non metal turning it looks Good BUT to work with metal, I don`t see how you can safely work with cutting bits in your hands???????????

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  • He Who Shall Not Be Named
    replied
    Originally posted by george View Post
    Now with your knowledge and experience, can you design a simple basic mini cheap lathe for metal use with the capacity to turn End Caps and you know how big those can be.




















    David

    Leave a comment:

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