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Weathering the 1/96 Type-212 Kit

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  • Weathering the 1/96 Type-212 Kit

    Weathering the 1/96 Type-212 Kit

    A Report to the Cabal:

    OK, with the basic painting and marking (draft markings only at this point) jobs done, time to move on with the weathering. This is the part where careful study of prototypes and attention to how the actual boats look, and what materials they are fabricated from, will pay you dividends -- you don't want to represent rust on a boat whose upper works is made of GRP! Oliver's great drawings and stuff I pulled off the Net served me well during this task.

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    The 212s have only been in the drink a few years, so you would be way off the mark to show one all scuzzed out with bird-****, gross running water streaks, and excessive failed paint. All the shots I've found of operational units show well fed sailors, well maintained boats, and no expense spared to keep these national assets in tip top shape. What that means to me, and to anyone else modeling one of these submarines, is that you had better use the light touch when weathering your little 212.

    At the end of today's work you see three 1/96 Type-212s that show little evidence of operational wear-and-tear. But, I can assure you, these models have been properly weathered. The biggest sign of 'use' being the scum line between the paint-work above waterline and the paint-work below waterline. The last operation tonight was to fix all the paint and weathering mediums that had been applied to the models -- this a well flattened clear-coat. Tomorrow will present me with three models ready for more paint work and weathering.

    It's a good practice to paint and weather in stages: to work out a paint-weathering chronology and to break up those operations with a protective clear coat -- this gives you the ability, in case of error, to abrade away the poor work down to the last clear coat, and start over again from that stage.

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    The weathering mediums I used on this model included Artist oil paints (the radial streaking seen atop the upper stern control surfaces, sail, and superstructure; pastel oil pencil and crayons; and
    a selection of gray markers to clean up any pulled paint or other errors in the substrate. Application tools were various types of brushes; rags; finger; single-action, external mix air-brush; and texture sticks.

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    I had previously painted on the deck non-skid and draft markings to the sides of the sail and to the inboard and outboard faces of the upper set of stern control surfaces. I then mixed up and sprayed the models with a heavy coat of well flattened clear-coat.

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    This morning I masked out the sail running light lens boarders and other deck and superstructure penetrations in preparation for some off-color painting, the idea was to use paint darker and lighter than the surrounding color to denote differences between these items and the rest of the structure. Careful study of the documentation told me where and what shade to paint things. Note that the diesel exhaust port got special attention not only with black to represent carbon soot, but also some scrubbing with oil paint mixed to a dark shade of gray to give it that 'exhaust' streaking look.

    Note that for fine spraying I don't even bother to attach a paint cup to my old reliable single-action, Paasche, Model-H, master-blaster -- I simply use an eye-dropper to transfer just a few drops of paint from the mixing cup into the open port at the base of the spray-brush's needle. I also took the time to produce plastic stencils of some shapes to help me make masks. Helps when you are doing multiple models and plan to do more of the same in the future.

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    With the detail areas painted, all masking was removed and I went about the task of representing the radial streaking that results from rain and sea water running off the boat, as well as the bleaching that results from the upper works being in almost constant sun-light, using Artist oils and a big-ass [Note to the Witch: this is a technical term. - Ed] streaking brush. The objective is to put a dab of white oil paint down on the paint board, pick up a bit in a very big brush, then to vigorously remove excess paint from the brush bristles onto a rag, then to swing the brush over the upper works of the model in quick radial strokes, with the brush hairs just barely making contact with the work. Only after the brush becomes almost thoroughly dry of paint do you apply more pressure on the bristles to blend in the streaks a bit with one another.

    Work first on your test-article before committing this work to the model(s).

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    There is a nearly white 'scum line' at the waterline. This went down using either an oil suspended pastel crayon or pencil, applied free-hand to the sides of the hull. The white was then rubbed with finger, rags and then a stiff brush to blend it in a bit with the above and below waterline portions of hull.


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    Woodland Scenics dry-transfer markings were employed to lay down the, 'U31' either side of the sail. And the three models were given a heavy clear-coat to get things ready for tomorrow's work.

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    Last edited by Outrider; 04-07-2010, 11:19 AM. Reason: The invisible hand of spell check, etc...
    Resident Luddite

  • #2
    splotches on the hull

    David,

    Is the splotchiness on the hull an example of you using toothpaste as a paint mask?
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    Dan
    Born in Detroit - where the weak are killed and eaten.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by roedj View Post
      David,

      Is the splotchiness on the hull an example of you using toothpaste as a paint mask?
      [ATTACH=CONFIG]3678[/ATTACH]

      Dan
      That's right, Dan. Examine any shot of a boat/ship/submarine that has been pulled out of the water and you will see a variety of colors (after a day or so, almost always bleached white, but in patches), but those colors pretty much stratified as to height, and broken as to form. The toothpaste masking is but one means to achieve this broken, splotchy look to adjoining colors and/or shades below the vessels waterline.

      And, taking your advice, Dan, I've worked out how to get the photos into the text. A big, big improvement as to my presentation of material. Thanks.

      David,
      Resident Luddite

      Comment


      • #4
        First, a few shots of the 'real thing' as reference

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        And now, the finished model
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        Resident Luddite

        Comment


        • #5
          whitish water line

          David,

          As far as I'm concerned, you can't do too many of these painting and weathering posts.

          But, I have a question...

          How do you achieve the whitish area shown at the water line? I assume it represents the area exposed to both the sun and the water intermittently by wave action or... ?
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          Dan
          Born in Detroit - where the weak are killed and eaten.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by roedj View Post
            David,

            As far as I'm concerned, you can't do too many of these painting and weathering posts.

            But, I have a question...

            How do you achieve the whitish area shown at the water line? I assume it represents the area exposed to both the sun and the water intermittently by wave action or... ?
            [ATTACH=CONFIG]3839[/ATTACH]

            Dan
            That whitish band at the waterline is dead, bleached out 'sea grass' that accumulates on and just below the waterline on boats floating in temperate waters.

            At 1/72 and smaller scales that bleached out white line is best laid down with an oil pencil or oil crayon like this:

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            As the bleached grass you're representing is not an even, uniform band of material, you work to lay it down in a slightly distorted pattern. After the white oil born pigment is on the model it is smudged and pushed around a bit with a stiff, short-haired brush, then finger and rag.

            You can highlight the scum line with oil paints, as I did on this 1/96 SKIPJACK class model

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            Resident Luddite

            Comment


            • #7
              David,

              OK, thanks.

              And then you seal the whole "look" up with a spray of Testor's Dullcote or something like that?

              Dan
              Born in Detroit - where the weak are killed and eaten.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by roedj View Post
                David,

                OK, thanks.

                And then you seal the whole "look" up with a spray of Testor's Dullcote or something like that?

                Dan
                Dan,

                Yes, a protective clear coat goes down. But unlike those weak, crummy hobby shop or box-store rattle-can clear coats I use an automotive refinishing product called ChromaClear. Produced by the DuPont company. This two-part, polyurethane system goes down as a very bright clear coating. However, with the introduction of a separate 'flattening' agent you can control the brightness of the finish from anywhere between a 'satin' to a totally 'flat' clear finish.

                David,
                Resident Luddite

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Merriman View Post
                  Dan,

                  Yes, a protective clear coat goes down. But unlike those weak, crummy hobby shop or box-store rattle-can clear coats I use an automotive refinishing product called ChromaClear. Produced by the DuPont company. This two-part, polyurethane system goes down as a very bright clear coating. However, with the introduction of a separate 'flattening' agent you can control the brightness of the finish from anywhere between a 'satin' to a totally 'flat' clear finish.

                  David,
                  1) Chroma Clear - as sold by auto paint stores or where?

                  2) Two part - can I premix them and spray with an air brush. If so, what is the thinner/airbrush cleaner? Or applied by soft brush or ...?

                  3) flattening agent - also a DuPont product or ...? Applied separately or mixed in with Chroma Clear?

                  I have years of weathering/painting model trains but never, until now, had too much worry about my work going underwater.

                  Dan (a rabid brain picker)
                  Born in Detroit - where the weak are killed and eaten.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You are the best sort of brain-picker, Dan. You ask intelligent, relevant and pointed questions. One reason I tolerate your constant pestering and interruptions.

                    And yes, Jungleload, there ARE stupid questions. And by extension, stupid question askers! The very reasons we kicked your dumb, unaccomplished, on-the-public-dole-and-proud-of-it, ass off this site.

                    Where was I? ...

                    ... Oh, yeah.

                    Being a long-time model railroad guy, Dan, you likely are comfortable with the Floquel brand of lacquers and PolyS line of water soluble bottled paints. All of which where recommended for spray-brush/gun application. Two systems that provided for some variance of the clear coats degree of reflectance or dullness. In the hands of experienced model railroad guys (and the top-end model railroad guys are masters of painting and weathering effects on both vehicles and structures) these products produce marvelous results in all scales. But, by and large, model railroad items are not in an out-of-doors environment, nor are the vehicles and structures subject to much handling (but, who does not enjoy the occasional commuter head-on or live-stock de-derailment at speed?!). These 'hobby' paints -- though the finest hobby paints one can find today -- are not suitable as a coating system for r/c ships or submarines. And when they are so used, the models quickly evidence scratches and paint failure, even on model ships and submarines that receive the maximum amount of care during storage, transport, and in-water use.

                    Todays hobby paints are not formulated to put abrasion resistance and UV desensitivity above the safety of the product. Hobby paints and clear coat systems are safe enough, and robust enough for static display models only. And in that capacity, in the hands of a skilled craftsman, those hobby paints can achieve remarkable results.

                    However, the hobby paints are all too often bought and miss-used by amateur morons. Some of whom would (and have) sue the manufacturers and the retailers, because the paint and/or clear-coat system sold could not be safely ingested through mouth, eye, ear, nose, anus, or IV drip. Some of these Darwin Award candidates have prevailed in tort court: turning a miss-use of a hobby product into a pay-day. The result: Todays hobby shops stock primers, fillers, putties, glues, paints, and tools that are SAFE, not USEFUL for the application intended.

                    Shakespeare was right.

                    You want a paint that sticks to just about everything and is as tough as nails when dried/cured? Or, do you want a paint that is safe.

                    Pick one!

                    OK, Dan. That out of the way, I'll move on to your questions.

                    1. ChromaClear is a two-part polyurethane system manufactured by DuPont. It's sold at automotive refinishing supply houses. A national franchise, the one I use here in Virginia is, Mattos. Gotta be one around you. I use the HC-7776S.

                    2. The catalyst, which is mixed with the clear, at a 1:4 ratio, is 7765S. Get the minimum quantities till you become comfortable with the system. Once mixed you'll have a pot-life of from 1-5 days, depending on how much you mix and the ambient temperature. The refrigerated mix will last a week or so before gelling. Only method of application recommended is by spray-brush/gun. This stuff is nasty, so use an air-line or charcoal mask.

                    3. The flattening agent is added to the mix after introducing the catalyst. You then add thinner (get the DuPont Lucite brand automotive acrylic lacquer thinner formulated for 'mild' temperature and humidity) till you get the desirable spray pattern and lay-down. The flattening agent is another DuPont product, and is called, Flattener 4531S and is EXPENSIVE!!!! But is like gold if you wish to get that perfect finish.

                    And that's the news from Lake Wobegone.

                    David,
                    Resident Luddite

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Last question (until the next one)

                      David,

                      At the risk of asking too many questions - I have another one.

                      I found all of the aforementioned DuPont products at usautopaint-dot-com and yes they're not cheap but what the hell. Mattos is a Mid-Atlantic PA to FL chain.

                      Are you saying that I can use my railroad Floquil and Polly-S paints for the color "look" followed by some of your weathering techniques if I then seal the whole thing with the DuPont Chroma Clear system?

                      Or, do you have a recommendation as to what paint to use for the color look as well? I have looked through several of your cabal reports but cannot find where you list the brand nor type of paint you use.

                      Dan
                      Born in Detroit - where the weak are killed and eaten.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by roedj View Post
                        David,

                        At the risk of asking too many questions - I have another one.

                        I found all of the aforementioned DuPont products at usautopaint-dot-com and yes they're not cheap but what the hell. Mattos is a Mid-Atlantic PA to FL chain.

                        Are you saying that I can use my railroad Floquil and Polly-S paints for the color "look" followed by some of your weathering techniques if I then seal the whole thing with the DuPont Chroma Clear system?

                        Or, do you have a recommendation as to what paint to use for the color look as well? I have looked through several of your cabal reports but cannot find where you list the brand nor type of paint you use.

                        Dan
                        Dan,

                        You would test compatibility of your Floquil undercoats to the ChromaClear overcoat on a test article. If compatible, you're good to go. However the solvents in the Chroma paints and clear systems I think are too hot for the Floquil undercoats. The Poly-S will be fine.

                        The paints I use is the two-part ChromaColor system available from the same source you identified.

                        David,
                        Resident Luddite

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Why do welds rust first?

                          Apologies if this isnt the right place to post this, however it sort of goes with the content of the thread, and im using this one to research my own above water weathering, and thought this little chemical reaction was a useful nugget.

                          During my fist year as an apprentice we had to make things out of metal, filing, drilling turning, and welding. I noticed that my nice clean (ahem) welds would a couple of days later start to rust up, although the rest of the metal was still shiney. As the welds cools it draws in moisture from the surrounding air and this kicks of the oxidisation process. Even if you slap paint on a day later without any sign of rust yet, the process is already in motion and rust will bubble up from under the paint.

                          Today in car manaufacturing, and engineering in general we clean up the surfaces to be painted by blast cleaning or some other system prior to applying the paint and ensure a good bond of paint to metal.

                          However on older vessels and in a war environment this cleaning up isnt going to have happened and welds are one of the areas which are going to show early signs of rust.
                          Next time someone points out it takes 42 muscles to frown, point out it will only take 4 muscles to b1tch slap them if they tell you how mnay muscles you need to smile:pop

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Albion,

                            Is there any possibility that the rust starts due to electrolysis between dissimilar metals in the weld and the substrate?

                            Dan
                            Born in Detroit - where the weak are killed and eaten.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Albion,

                              Dan just stole my thunder.

                              Gee ... THANKS, Dan.

                              Another reason that weld beads (unless ground down flush with the work) become a source of rust is that the bead itself stands proud of the surrounding metal. Its protective coating is easily abraded off exposing the raw metal to the elements.

                              Good observation, Albion, and most appropriate to the thread.

                              David,
                              Resident Luddite

                              Comment

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