Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and expectations

Hello, and welcome to the forums at the Nautilus Drydocks, formerly Sub-driver.com!

We welcome anyone with a passion for submarines and a desire to learn and share knowledge about this fascinating hobby. Use of these forums indicates your intention to abide by our code of conduct:


1. No spam. All automated messages, advertisements, and links to competitor websites will be deleted immediately.

2. Please post in relevant sub-forums only. Messages posted in the wrong topic area will be removed and placed in the correct sub-forum by moderators.

3. Respect other users. No flaming or abusing fellow forum members. Users who continue to post inflammatory, abusive comments will be deleted from the forum after or without a warning.

4. No threats or harassment of other users will be tolerated. Any instance of threatening or harassing behavior is grounds for deletion from the forums.

5. No profanity or pornography is allowed. Posts containing adult material will be deleted.

6. No re-posting of copyrighted materials or other illegal content is allowed. Any posts containing illegal content or copyrighted materials will be deleted.
See more
See less

New 1/72 Golf II kit

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    That is good news. All those Foxtrot masts the Golf uses. I have such a hard time finding the right casting resin to cast the mast parts. I pulled all my hair out doing them. You still have the Foxtrot hull by chance? Maybe you could make some extra masts for the Golf. Thank god the West epoxy I am using doesn't make my eyes swollen like the other epoxy I was using. Do you have any decent drawings for a Thresher/Permit?

    Comment


    • #17
      The only thing that was holding me back to put the GOLF on my wish list is the proportion of her sail.
      I had concerns that the large sail surface, and the drag that goes when making submersed turns will result in a tremendous list when making the turn.

      As she is not equipped with dorsal rudder like the ALBACORE she will need some stabilization with her dive planes by means of a transvers placed auto leveler.
      I donít think the missile tube extension on her lower hull (bulge) will compensate for the drag of her sail.

      Personally, I would cheat a little bit (adapt and overcome) and extend the bulge a little further to compensate for the sail, just to make sure.

      It is not my intention to offend you or criticize your you great looking project you have going here. Just want to share my concerns I had myself when pondering over fabricating this model.

      Your masters are looking awesome

      Grtz,
      Bart
      Practical wisdom is only to be learned in the school of experience.
      "Samuel Smiles"
      http://scale-submarine.com/index.html

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by 598602G View Post
        That is good news. All those Foxtrot masts the Golf uses. I have such a hard time finding the right casting resin to cast the mast parts. I pulled all my hair out doing them. You still have the Foxtrot hull by chance? Maybe you could make some extra masts for the Golf. Thank god the West epoxy I am using doesn't make my eyes swollen like the other epoxy I was using. Do you have any decent drawings for a Thresher/Permit?
        Excellent, I have a box full of bagged parts I have to pick through to find your parts, so give me a week or two on that, and I'll get them off to you -- the flood completely messed up what-went-where in the shop (the metal parts were all on the floor at the time of the flood and would up all over the place). Got to collate!

        David
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

        Comment


        • #19
          "was a sonar tech on the USS Abraham Lincoln SSBN 602(G)."

          When were you on Lincoln?
          US Submarine Force: Making the Navy worthwhile since 1900

          Comment


          • #20
            Was on the Lincoln from 77-80. Boat was in Guam. Those were the good ole days when everyone new who the enemy was. Think I will have to put a 598 on my build list.

            Comment


            • #21
              Just wondering, My dad was a plank owner on Lincoln.
              US Submarine Force: Making the Navy worthwhile since 1900

              Comment


              • #22
                Thanks Dave for looking for those parts. I even thought about making a Foxtrot since the last Foxtrot thing went south. I thought about doing the Foxtrot or a Whiskey. Now someone was asking about the sea keeping of the Golf. I just have to make a light weight yet strong sail so it is not top heavy. I enlarged the stern planes only slightly and the rudder is enlarged.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by 598602G View Post
                  Thanks Dave for looking for those parts. I even thought about making a Foxtrot since the last Foxtrot thing went south. I thought about doing the Foxtrot or a Whiskey. Now someone was asking about the sea keeping of the Golf. I just have to make a light weight yet strong sail so it is not top heavy. I enlarged the stern planes only slightly and the rudder is enlarged.
                  Diesel boats (ALBACORE and the Soviet counterpart excluded) don't go fast enough for foil-roll to be an issue. And that deep keel (bulged to accommodate the launcher pedestal) affords plenty of distance between the vertical component of the c.g. and c.b. Not to sweat it.

                  I was WEBSTER (blue) out of Guam (arm-pit of the Pacific) in the mid-70's. Only thing I got out of Guam was crabs. Nine patrols as launcher tech/Torpedoman.



                  David
                  "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    You know what Guam stands for? Gooks Under American Management. My brother was on the Thomas Jefferson in Guam same time I was in Guam. I got a awesome trim party on a patrol on the Lincoln one time. 598 has the biggest torpedo room other than a Skipjack to get a really good trim party going because we had 6 tubes forward. You have to pity the torpedomen on a 598 as they had to load torpedo's in the tubes with a block and tackle. Go figure.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 598602G View Post
                      You know what Guam stands for? Gooks Under American Management. My brother was on the Thomas Jefferson in Guam same time I was in Guam. I got a awesome trim party on a patrol on the Lincoln one time. 598 has the biggest torpedo room other than a Skipjack to get a really good trim party going because we had 6 tubes forward. You have to pity the torpedomen on a 598 as they had to load torpedo's in the tubes with a block and tackle. Go figure.
                      Hell, the 598's HAD SKIPJACK torpedo-rooms! Massive.

                      Block and tackle was high-tech to us too. But, if the Weapons Officer was out of the room, we simply put our backs to the prop-guards and pushed them along the skids by hand. Not many small TM's on the boats; Our motto: "I may not be able to spell it, but I can lift it!".

                      David
                      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Russians hated the Lincoln. 598's were faster and could maneuver better then most of there garbage. They were always waiting for us to come out of port with there so called fishing trawlers AGI. Man when we would hit flank speed that boat would just shake and shudder. You ask people about if they served over there about the time I was in when the Lincoln almost sank. Everyone use to call my boat the Sinkin Lincoln after that. If I remember correctly we had Mk48, Mk37 and a few Mk18 torpedo's.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by 598602G View Post
                          Russians hated the Lincoln. 598's were faster and could maneuver better then most of there garbage. They were always waiting for us to come out of port with there so called fishing trawlers AGI. Man when we would hit flank speed that boat would just shake and shudder. You ask people about if they served over there about the time I was in when the Lincoln almost sank. Everyone use to call my boat the Sinkin Lincoln after that. If I remember correctly we had Mk48, Mk37 and a few Mk18 torpedo's.
                          Bad manifold set-up from the BCP? Or did someone get stupid with the TDU?

                          We had MK-37's, MK-14's, and one MK-45 (for that very 'special' occasion). MK-48's were just coming into the fleet when I got out of the submarine community. I helped certify them at Keyport, but never operated with them.

                          Doubt you had MK-18's (old WW-2 era electric straight-runner). Maybe MK-16?

                          Loved Pearl! Off-crewed there. Flew a lot of r/c and c/l on Ford Island with Doug Smith (another FTB). Was the perfect life for single guys. Flights to Japan were not that long. That's where I caught Yellow-Fever.

                          David
                          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I think they were Mk14's. My first patrol I had a sheet of aluminum and a foam mattress and I slept next to the torpedo's because there was no rack available. I stayed in those barracks on Ford Island. I remember having to take the ferry to Ford. You remember we use to store are cars in those hangars on Ford with all the bullet holes from WWII

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I remember being dead asleep in the torpedo room when the friggin torpedo men decided to shoot water slugs. Woke me up and scared the **** out of me

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                The reason we almost went down and sank forever was because a stupid LTJG OOD. Some how he over filled aft trims tanks by about 80,000lbs. Some how the reactor scrammed. I was in sonar watching the depth gauge move fast and we were sinking backwards at 30+ degrees. I here the diving officer throw the chicken switches. When we broke the surface we came down so hard on the fair water planes it broke the hydraulic ram. Those guys back aft didn't know they went below TD. Anyway we had to fire up the diesel and run on the diesel in a sea state 3. Every time a wave hit the snorkel induction valve would close and your ear drums would get sucked into your head. Thank god for a Fairbanks Morse. Guess that makes me a DBF guy.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X