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Fitting Everything Into Your SubDriver

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  • Fitting Everything Into Your SubDriver

    Or... trying to fit 10lbs of wires and connectors into a 5lb cylinder.

    I need some help from the wise on how to jam everything into the aft dry space on my 2 inch Sub Driver. I feel like it would be appropriate to call it the machinery space... Anyway. I have tried bunching all of the wires from the servos up with mini zip-ties, but I still found myself basically cramming all of this stuff in there and thinking there has to be a better way.

    So, I turn to the group. Curious to see how you all have overcome this problem of space - or a decided lack thereof.


    Thank you in advance!

    -Brady

  • #2
    A good, valid, and timely question, Brady. And one that deserves a complete answer. Tonight I'll dig through my photos (and shoot supplemental ones if needed) that will help with the narrative to explain how to get all that **** into such a small space.

    Pleas, stand-by!

    David
    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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    • #3
      Oh thank god. I will put my Dremel tool and cutting torch down, and slowly back away from the workbench until I hear more!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DMTNT View Post
        Oh thank god. I will put my Dremel tool and cutting torch down, and slowly back away from the workbench until I hear more!
        "HANDS UP, WHERE I CAN SEE 'EM!"

        David
        The Horrible
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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        • #5
          First they should change the name from sub driver to "blivit" (5lbs of &*!^ in a 3lb bag) My solution(might not be applicable for all) is to relocate as much equipment as possible outside the WTC and in the wet space. They have waterproof servos(real ones) that don't have to waste all that dry space (and if you don't trust them-belt and suspenders, mount them upside down and trap the air bubble so water can't leak in-but it wont.) I also use a waterproof ESC-those two items probably just saved 6 cu inches and a bunch of push rod watertight seals.

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          • #6
            Found this while look for magnetic actuators.
            Need some of these miniature robots to run the boat.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Scott T View Post
              Found this while look for magnetic actuators.
              Need some of these miniature robots to run the boat.
              That is as unsettling as it is fascinating, Scott. I like it!

              Comment


              • #8
                Reminds me of the story about a gaeocologist who decorated his hallway through the letter box.

                im trying to squeeze a lot of things into a dual drive 2.5Ē cylinder right now. I found that putting it down for a few days and coming back to it I see different ways to install things . I just bought a set of plugs and pins for my servos, so this afternoon will be trying to shorten the servo leads. Or more likely throwing out Servo s with short leads that donít work anymore and fitting new servos
                Next time someone points out it takes 42 muscles to frown, point out it will only take 4 muscles to b1tch slap them if they tell you how mnay muscles you need to smile:pop

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                • #9
                  For the price of a handfull of servo extension wires (cheap on ebay) you can cut and solder any size you need-stagger the splices and use one piece of shrink for all 3 wires-they won't short c and it eliminates that unruly spaghetti..If the servo still works-don't toss it.

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                  • #10










                    David
                    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Nice work-consider if you were to stagger the splices(to where they wouldn't touch if you squeezed them together uninsulated) then one piece of shrink tube would seal and cover them all eliminating that three separate splice look-and in tight quarters they do take up some xtra space and can lead to confusion. And whenever my fingertips work I try to do a soldered Western Union splice

                      BTW, I love that steam punk bench vice!
                      Last edited by Bob Gato; 03-15-2019, 08:50 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Worked slowly and checked my work at each step, I still have 3 working servos. $2.6 worth of parts, although nearly as many pins in the bin as I used.
                        Next time someone points out it takes 42 muscles to frown, point out it will only take 4 muscles to b1tch slap them if they tell you how mnay muscles you need to smile:pop

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                        • #13
                          Or you could not solder.....
                          I did this on my Type XXIII.
                          This is what it looked like at first.
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                          Yikes....pretty scary.

                          Then I went and bought a crimper and some servo ends.
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                          With these tools I was able to cut the servo to the proper length and add a new end on it. No soldering.....which is a good thing for me.

                          The end result was a clean, orderly Sub-Driver.
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                          If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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                          • #14
                            I was just about to to ask Trout to repost and low and behold he did!!

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                            • #15
                              beautiful-I don't know which is easier for me solder or crimp pins-they say whatever turns your propellers-you obviously have yours turning max RPM and in sync (nice job)..I'll have to give it a try sometime

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