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Well Rats! Water Tight Cylinder Ain’t!

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  • Well Rats! Water Tight Cylinder Ain’t!

    Well darn it! Just when I thought this sub was ready for action I find significant water inside the WTC this morning. I was getting ready for some final trimming when I noticed the pitch planes weren’t working. Thought maybe the battery was down so took it out to recharge and saw a few drops in the forward battery compartment. Dried that out and changed the battery. Tried again in a few hours and still no joy on the pitch planes. Then I noticed a lot of water in tue engine compartment. A good tablespoon or 2 or 3 in there. Its all drying out now. Just hope I did not fry any electronics.

  • #2
    When I do a build, I always (usually) start with cylinder assembly. Once that thing is put together and functioning, I move on to cylinder testing. This includes not only the testing of cylinder functionality, but equally as important, the watertight integrity of the unit. This is where the installation of some form of testing hose is absolutely imperative. I usually double duty this hose as a test facilitator and a housing to run the antenna outside the cylinder, but you can also run the hose alone. It's exceptionally simple... just put in a piece of brass tube to the endcap and slip the rubber hose over it. Cap the end and you're done.

    To test, uncap the hose, drop the cylinder in the tub and blow into the hose. If you've got a leak, you'll spot precisely where it's coming from. The positive air pressure means that you won't get water in the cylinder no matter what.

    The new MSD's come with the test hose nipple already in place in the endcap.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by SubHuman View Post
      When I do a build, I always (usually) start with cylinder assembly. Once that thing is put together and functioning, I move on to cylinder testing. This includes not only the testing of cylinder functionality, but equally as important, the watertight integrity of the unit. This is where the installation of some form of testing hose is absolutely imperative. I usually double duty this hose as a test facilitator and a housing to run the antenna outside the cylinder, but you can also run the hose alone. It's exceptionally simple... just put in a piece of brass tube to the endcap and slip the rubber hose over it. Cap the end and you're done.

      To test, uncap the hose, drop the cylinder in the tub and blow into the hose. If you've got a leak, you'll spot precisely where it's coming from. The positive air pressure means that you won't get water in the cylinder no matter what.

      The new MSD's come with the test hose nipple already in place in the endcap.
      … and the antenna-pressure test hose provided.

      David
      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

      Comment


      • #4
        This leaking was a new occurrence. I have been dunking the WTC for the past month regularly with no leaks until this last try with it installed in the hull for final trimming. After that is when I noticed the water inside the WTC. I will try the hose on the front end cap before I put the WTC back inside the hull. Right now I am having issues with the schrader valve in the front cap pulling out of the cap. When I was test fitting a hose to the valve it pulled right out of the cap. Should I use CA or RTV silicone to reseal it?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by llangston1 View Post
          This leaking was a new occurrence. I have been dunking the WTC for the past month regularly with no leaks until this last try with it installed in the hull for final trimming. After that is when I noticed the water inside the WTC. I will try the hose on the front end cap before I put the WTC back inside the hull. Right now I am having issues with the schrader valve in the front cap pulling out of the cap. When I was test fitting a hose to the valve it pulled right out of the cap. Should I use CA or RTV silicone to reseal it?
          CA.

          As the leaking was a 'one time occurrence', may I suggest what likely happened was an O-ring rolled out of it's groove when you installed it, and that was the leak path?

          Whenever you re-install a bulkhead always roll the cylinder so you can inspect that the O-ring has not gotten out of the bulkheads machined groove.

          That's my story, and I'm sticking to it, damnit!

          David
          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree plus as I was adding foam inside the forward hull for trim I started having problems with getting the WTC to fit easily i side the upper hull when assembling the hull. I could have opened the Schrader valve on the end cap by accident. I am reworking that forward nose area foam to try and fix that. I just used CA to re attach that forward end cap valve. That seems to work fine. Also the old SubSafe device seems to be working OK after a few days drying out. I removed the circuit board and rinsed it in alcohol. I would do the same with the old angle keeper but can’t get it out of it’s box. That circuit board seems to be glued or RTV’d to the box and will not come out easily.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by llangston1 View Post
              I agree plus as I was adding foam inside the forward hull for trim I started having problems with getting the WTC to fit easily i side the upper hull when assembling the hull. I could have opened the Schrader valve on the end cap by accident. I am reworking that forward nose area foam to try and fix that. I just used CA to re attach that forward end cap valve. That seems to work fine. Also the old SubSafe device seems to be working OK after a few days drying out. I removed the circuit board and rinsed it in alcohol. I would do the same with the old angle keeper but can’t get it out of it’s box. That circuit board seems to be glued or RTV’d to the box and will not come out easily.
              You can't open a simple, ****ing plastic box???? Get midevil on its ass! This is why God gave us power tools, pal.

              David
              "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

              Comment


              • #8
                No, I can easily get medieval on the box. It is open I am just concerned about breaking the circuit board that is glued to the box. I can break the box but if I break the board it’s toast anyway. Hmmmm! The auto leveler circuit just fell out of it’s box.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by llangston1 View Post
                  No, I can easily get medieval on the box. It is open I am just concerned about breaking the circuit board that is glued to the box. I can break the box but if I break the board it’s toast anyway. Hmmmm! The auto leveler circuit just fell out of it’s box.
                  Cut away the sides of the box so you can see what's holding the board to the bottom of the box. If it's super-man quality servo tape then a gentle, long-term pull will lift the PCB off the tape. You got to get to both sides of the board here -- water, over time, is a circuit killer.

                  David
                  "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I will do that?

                    Comment

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