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1/72 688 LA SSN kit build

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  • 1/72 688 LA SSN kit build

    Got this 1/72 688 kit from Bob at Nautilus Drydocks. Never built anything 3D plastic printed so... Boat is 58" long with a 5 1/2" beam. Couldn't this boat is longer then my Victor III. These boats just started to come out back in the 70's when I was on boats. Real nice quality kit from the Czech Republic. Can we say Czechoslovakia anymore? Uses a armor plated PVC sewer pipe for a center hull. You could way lay someone over the head with that hull and knock them smooth out. Pretty simple just screw and glue kind of thing. Nice PE parts. For sure you are going to have to do some sanding of the 3D plastic parts. Takes about a 65mm-70mm 7 bladed prop.

  • #2
    RCSUBS.CZ, Oto Gerza has some of the best lineups of sub Makes I have seen from one place. I have a large assortment of his PE for my Static and R/C subs and it is the BEST!! Nice guy to chat with! Bob is selling his line of Products!! Looking forward too seeing you working this model!!

    Brian
    What one Man can do, YOU can do too!

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    • #3
      Looks like they got the LA shape right. And the engineering of part break-down makes sense. This will be a fine looking model, Tim. You and I were on the boats about the same time. I was a TM-0. You?
      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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      • #4
        I was a STSSS SN. Ping jockey on 598 boomers. Boris better get back with me soon on those Foxtrot plans or I am going to have to scratch out the 1/72 Charlie II first. Waiting for your sail to cure Dave for the Victor.

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        • #5
          Sure wish he would increase the resolution of his printer. Those large steps on the 3d printed parts that you are going to smooth out do not have to be like that.

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          • #6
            I had heard that these 3D printers are supposed to make finer parts. It is going to take me some serious sanding to get the parts smooth. For me I will stick to my old laying up glass cloth and epoxy resin.

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            • #7
              With FDM printers it depends on the layer thickness the parts are printed in. You can go down to very fine layers, but it greatly extends the printing time. With these kits you're paying for machine time, so I would suspect they're printed in 0.2mm layer thickness. 3D printers like HP multijet fusion get round these issues, but the printers still remain rather expensive, and beyond home users, but they'll get cheaper over time.
              DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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              • #8
                See I know nothing about 3D printing and how they work. I am an old school type modeler.

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                • #9
                  Three main methods of 3d printing- FDM, SLS,/multijet fusion and SLA. There are variations on these, but they're subtleties.

                  FDM- fused deposition modelling is the most popular for hobby level, as it's inexpensive and gives a large build area. it's basically like a very fine glue gun or caulking tube robotically manipulated, filament comes in a cord/filament like form wrapped on a reel, and is melted down and extruded through a nozzle, this then basically builds up the part a layer at a time like piping icing onto a cake. The finer the layers, the finer the print, but this is limited by the accuracy of the machine and how long you want to print for- large prints can take days, and the longer the machine is printing the more wear and tear, and the greater the chances something goes wrong with the print.

                  SLS - selective laser sintering and multijet fusion don't use filament, they use plastic powder. The powder is deposited in thin layers, then selectively fused using either lasers (SLS) or a binding agent which is activated/cured with infrared lamps (multijet fusion). This system produces really strong parts, with a slightly furry texture to them. Machines cost tens of thousands.

                  SLA- stereo lithography apparatus works by starting out with a pot of resin, which can be cured by exposure to ultraviolet light. The model is cured layer by layer and rises out of the resin pot as if by magic. The downside is cost, resins are costly and some can be brittle, the printing area tends to be restricted for consumer machines. It's great for making very highly detailed parts beyond FDM and SLS/MJF. It's possible to combine the two for their respective strengths.
                  DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Subculture View Post
                    Three main methods of 3d printing- FDM, SLS,/multijet fusion and SLA. There are variations on these, but they're subtleties.

                    FDM- fused deposition modelling is the most popular for hobby level, as it's inexpensive and gives a large build area. it's basically like a very fine glue gun or caulking tube robotically manipulated, filament comes in a cord/filament like form wrapped on a reel, and is melted down and extruded through a nozzle, this then basically builds up the part a layer at a time like piping icing onto a cake. The finer the layers, the finer the print, but this is limited by the accuracy of the machine and how long you want to print for- large prints can take days, and the longer the machine is printing the more wear and tear, and the greater the chances something goes wrong with the print.

                    SLS - selective laser sintering and multijet fusion don't use filament, they use plastic powder. The powder is deposited in thin layers, then selectively fused using either lasers (SLS) or a binding agent which is activated/cured with infrared lamps (multijet fusion). This system produces really strong parts, with a slightly furry texture to them. Machines cost tens of thousands.

                    SLA- stereo lithography apparatus works by starting out with a pot of resin, which can be cured by exposure to ultraviolet light. The model is cured layer by layer and rises out of the resin pot as if by magic. The downside is cost, resins are costly and some can be brittle, the printing area tends to be restricted for consumer machines. It's great for making very highly detailed parts beyond FDM and SLS/MJF. It's possible to combine the two for their respective strengths.
                    Most informative, Andy. Thanks.

                    David
                    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                    Comment

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