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Part rubber part hardcase GRP tooling

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  • Part rubber part hardcase GRP tooling

    I remember reading about tools where part of the tooling was rubber, to resolve fine detail and/or relieve an undercut, and the rest a hardcase. I was looking at using this method for a couple of hulls I want to mould, part of reasoning is to reduce the amount of tool parts I'd need to effect a release, and the other is that I would like a tool where I can join the halves together in the tool if possible.

    It seems most builders use a complete rubber tool or complete hardcase tool, which made me wonder if there as a few issues with the combined method?
    DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

  • #2
    If I had to do it ...and I don't know if it would work-yet...I'd build the tool (and I assume mold) from rubber to as stated to allow for undercut and/or detail. Then I'd produce a splittable hardcase support mold of and for that rubber liner...I'd build in alignment tabs and rails to both hold and position the inner liner and outer shell-two separate entities more like a hybrid mold..I think also with the rubber-no need for parting agent or air pressure or wild gymnastics to separate the finished product from the mold.
    Last edited by Bob Gato; 03-17-2019, 01:49 PM.

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    • #3
      Familiar with that method, however it doesn't seem to be suitable for joining the parts together in the tool, which is a method I favour.
      DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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      • #4









        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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        • #5

          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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          • #6

            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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            • #7

              "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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              • #8

                "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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                • #9
                  Subculture-what parts are we talking about-a hull in two pieces? surely there is an opening-or is it to be a closed bottle-you can stretch or deform a rubber liner to remove a casting that is larger then the opening-in which case there is no Two Parts? Possibly you are using the tooling to align the halves for joining (but how do you apply resin and glass to the seam without an opening?)

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                  • #10
                    I was thinking of the tools Dave made for his 1/96th Skipjack. I'm sure that was part hard case, but the scribed areas used rubber. Nice Disney Nautilus is that 1/48?
                    DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Subculture View Post
                      I was thinking of the tools Dave made for his 1/96th Skipjack. I'm sure that was part hard case, but the scribed areas used rubber. Nice Disney Nautilus is that 1/48?
                      Yes, the original 1/96 SKIPJACK tooling was a hybrid -- part hard-shell, part rubber. It was a bridge too far: though it was an easier tool to produce and manage I could never beat the slight (and sometimes not so slight demarcation line between rubber and GRP tool sections. I invested at least as much work in cleaning up those lines (depressions in the parts) as I saved during the tool making process. No pictures survived here, as the work was done way before I entered the 'digital' world, and I lost the negatives to a flood. But the imagery survives in a few articles and two books I contributed to.

                      Best course of action is to make the traditional glove-mother mold type tool if your GRP part has deep or negative draft and fine detailing.

                      Yes, the big N tooling belongs to Bob. The originator is the god-father of all things Disney NAUTILUS, Scott Brodeen. Bob bought this and other tooling. I've had this particular tool here in order to work out the lay-up protocol. The big deal was how to capture all that rivet detail in a GRP lay-up. Bob will be here next month to get some training in on it and some other items, then he's back to his sprawling industrial complex in Florida to carry on with production.

                      David
                      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bob Gato View Post
                        Subculture-what parts are we talking about-a hull in two pieces? surely there is an opening-or is it to be a closed bottle-you can stretch or deform a rubber liner to remove a casting that is larger then the opening-in which case there is no Two Parts? Possibly you are using the tooling to align the halves for joining (but how do you apply resin and glass to the seam without an opening?)
                        You would lay up the two halves, leaving about a 1/4" no-GRP strip near the flange-line. Pour in some fast-cure epoxy resin into one-half of the tool, Butten up the two hull halves, then slowly rotate the entire tool to slush the resin into the seams where the two hull half flanges meet. Messy, but effective.

                        David
                        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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                        • #13
                          Ah right, so you've answered the nagging suspicion I had about the hybrid tooling, that you get faults develop in the casting between the rubber tooling and the hard case tooling. So a full rubber tool it looks like it will be then.
                          DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Subculture View Post
                            Ah right, so you've answered the nagging suspicion I had about the hybrid tooling, that you get faults develop in the casting between the rubber tooling and the hard case tooling. So a full rubber tool it looks like it will be then.
                            Based on my limited experience, that would be my recommendation, Andy.

                            David
                            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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                            • #15
                              What is that black box with fibers coming out?
                              Again pictures to pour over.
                              If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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