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Masts up or down?

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  • Masts up or down?

    Question for the group. What are your thoughts on building a model with the periscopes & masts all down and the sail in a clean configuration? For practical purposes of tracking it from the shoreline, I could see having it that way could make keeping track of your boat all that much harder.

    Just curious.

    -Brady

  • #2
    As many things sticking up high into the air as possible!





















    If you can't see it, you can't drive it!!!!

    David
    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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    • #3




















      David
      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

      Comment


      • #4




















        David
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

        Comment


        • #5
          When I look back at the things that you have done I realize two things; 1. there won't be another one of you along anytime soon, and 2. I'd better get as much learning done now while I can!

          Comment


          • #6
            Well I guess that answers that. LOL

            As always, thank you for the eye candy, and for reminding us all just how much better you are at this than anyone else :-D

            -Brady

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by HardRock View Post
              When I look back at the things that you have done I realize two things; 1. there won't be another one of you along anytime soon, and 2. I'd better get as much learning done now while I can!
              Amen

              i ran my skipjack with all scopes down, well I broke my periscope, and did not enjoy it as much. Having at least one scopeup reduces the pucker factor. Plus I like seeing the periscope up and looking around.
              If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DMTNT View Post
                Well I guess that answers that. LOL

                As always, thank you for the eye candy, and for reminding us all just how much better you are at this than anyone else :-D

                -Brady
                I'm better at this than you bums because of those guys who set the standard in this game: Gene Berger, Nick Burge, Dan Kachur, Skip Asay, Mike Dorey, Rick Polumbo, Greg Jein, Tom Scherman, Greg Sharpe, Norbert Bruggen, Lothar Menze, Kevin McLeod, Rick Teskey, Dennis Allen, Ben Guenther, Loren Perry, Scott Brodeen, David Manley, Ron Perrott, and my Dad and Mom (Craftsmen, both).

                I judge my work by their work. And that work is classified as scale model building, and the mechanics that turns an inanimate display piece into a fully capable r/c vehicle. Most of the guys listed (and there are others, who's names escape me) are masters at one or the other. A few of them (and I count myself as one of this very small group) do both model building and practical mechanical engineering very well.

                We are, in our time, the standard. Some of you will ascend to the status of a 'standard' someday -- I have no doubt!

                This is a Craft. What we present is the sum of our knowledge and skills to the moment. And as other crafts, we are judged by the accepted standards of the moment.

                Yeah, I'm one of the Masters in this game. No doubt. I've earned that status. But only after careful study of the work of my betters and applying those lessons to my work.

                I stand tall today because I stand on the shoulders of the experts who came before me.

                Pass it on, troops! Don't let it die with us.

                David
                Last edited by He Who Shall Not Be Named; 01-01-2019, 10:40 AM.
                "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

                  I'm better at this than you bums because of those guys who set the standard in this game: Gene Berger, Nick Burge, Dan Kachur, Skip Asay, Mike Dorey, Rick Polumbo, Greg Jein, Tom Scherman, Greg Sharpe, Norbert Bruggen, Lothar Menze, Kevin McLeod, Rick Teskey, Dennis Allen, Ben Guenther, Loren Perry, Scott Brodeen, David Manley, Ron Perrott, and my Dad and Mom (Craftsmen, both).

                  I judge my work by their work. And that work is classified as scale model building, and the mechanics that turns an inanimate display piece into a fully capable r/c vehicle. Most of the guys listed (and there are others, who's names escape me) are masters at one or the other. A few of them (and I count myself as one of this very small group) do both model building and practical mechanical engineering very well.

                  We are, in our time, the standard. Some of you will ascend to the status of a 'standard' someday -- I have no doubt!

                  This is a Craft. What we present is the sum of our knowledge and skills to the moment. And as other crafts, we are judged by the accepted standards of the moment.

                  Yeah, I'm one of the Masters in this game. No doubt. I've earned that status. But only after careful study of the work of my betters and applying those lessons to my work.

                  I stand tall today because I stand on the shoulders of the experts who came before me.

                  Pass it on, troops! Don't let it die with us.

                  David
                  Of course. That was also said with a healthy amount of jest, sir! It’s always a pleasure to see your work and watch you create. That goes for the lot of you here too, as well. Not just sucking up when I say that, either. You guys consistently blow me away with your ingenuity and ability on each one of these new projects I see come to life.

                  A story, if you’ will allow me for a minute...

                  I’ am 31 years old, and have been building models (mostly airplanes) for at least two of those decades. My folks still smile about the first one I ever tried to paint - a Blue Angels F-18 that probably had about fifty coats of blue paint brushed on.

                  Sometime that had to have been pre 9/11, my scout troop got to tour USS Henry M. Jackson in drydock at Bangor. I remember building a plastic model of a sub not too long after, but was disappointed that it just “sat there.” It didn’t seem to do the subject any justice. Then around 2003, I think, my troop went down to Portland OR and got a tour of/got to spend the night on USS Bluebeck. Right around that same time, I was introduced to the idea of a radio controlled submarine and I have been captivated by that notion ever since.

                  I dreamed about an Engel Typhoon but settled on a Dumas Akula after seeing BigDave’’’ and his modified example on the Subcommittee forum. Quickly realizing I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, I remember calling Skip Asay on the phone a few times and chatting with him. About the only thing I remember from our conversations is him telling me what decks awash meant, but looking back I think about how kind it was for him to spend 20 minutes on the phone trying to help out some lost little kid. That project finally got the better of me. Jump forward to college, and I decided to have another run at it. Only this time with a ScaleShips Akula and the help of Kevin Price. History repeated itself, again, and that beautiful kit got the better of me. Eventually I ended up trading Kevin my unfinished hull for his working example of the same boat. Mechanically, I didn’’t learn much, but I at least refinished it and was proud of my result. When money got extra tight, I regrettably sold that boat back to Kevin. Jump forward to the more recent past and that itch to was still there. I became determined to make this happen this time. Fascinated by the shadowy histories of Halibut, Seawolf, Parche and now Jimmy Carter, I decided to try turning a Trumpeter Seawolf into SSN-23. Especially after seeing those photos of her returning to port flying the Jolly Roger. I mean, come on... how do you get more bada** than an active US Navy warship flying a pirate flag? Hence my handle on here, DMTNT - Dead Men Tell No Tales.

                  This has, without a doubt, been the most technically complex thing I have ever created. I have absolutely no idea what I’ am doing, but when I look back over the last year that I have been working on this project, I see just how much I have learned from watching the likes of you guys. I’ am so grateful that this tight little community is what it is. David, of course you’re a giant, but in my eyes, all of you guys are, and I’m just lucky to be here.

                  Thank you for letting me reminisce, and thank you all for just being the crazy, great little family you are. I hope to earn my dolphins, so to speak, soon and finally have a working sub to take to the pond. She’ is very close, and I can’not wait.

                  Cheers to a new year, gentlemen.


                  -Brady
                  Last edited by DMTNT; 01-01-2019, 02:55 PM. Reason: Trying to post on an iPhone

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank for sharing your history, Brady. I'm delighted to see a young man interested in this the most challenging type of r/c vehicles.

                    Got rotors and yokes going out to you tomorrow. Need anything else?

                    We got a good group here. We don't suffer fools.... … just each other. A belated 'welcome aboard', sir.

                    Let's get your USS PeaNut into the water this year. What's your next project?

                    David
                    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That much I can promise. Thank you again for all of your generosity and assistance. There’s a local RC boat club I would like to join, and I’ had reached out to the gentleman who was supposed to head up the area Subcommittee chapter, but have heard no reply. Maybe it’s time to strike out on my own and start something anew?

                      As for what’’s next? The part of me that isn’t made of money says something I can borrow Carter’s 2” inch SD for. The enterprising part of me says an IVY BELLS Parche in 1/96 because that’s supposed to be such a wonderful kit. The insane part of me says I modify her post her early 90’s refit with the big nose. There’s also the matter of that November that’s taking shape looks awfully tempting. Oy, you guys.


                      I love it!


                      -Brady
                      Last edited by DMTNT; 01-01-2019, 06:05 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ivy Bells (and that prick Aldrich Ames), 1/96 Parche - still my beating heart!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          O
                          Originally posted by HardRock View Post
                          Ivy Bells (and that prick Aldrich Ames), 1/96 Parche - still my beating heart!
                          I drove over to Bremerton this past August on a whim and got to spend a little time with her sail. Kind of like those moments after hours at the Museum of Flight with the M-21 Blackbird. Putting my hand against the steel and closing my eyes, thinking about all the places it’d been, and all the things it did that we’ll never know about. It was spiritual.
                          Click image for larger version  Name:	4D6E411D-CAAE-4BB0-AF75-5FB4E6BB39AF.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	490.5 KB ID:	129300

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