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Type VII SubDriver

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  • Type VII SubDriver

    We just picked up a new Type VII SubDriver (assembled version). My son was quick to inspect the package. Here's his report.

    The (new Caswell) mission switch is an easy drop in, but a tight fit. Most of the the washers would not fit. He's got the outermost collar on tight and the rubber cover over the assembly. What's the correct set-up?

    The port motor shaft turns freely in both directions. There is obvious magnetic resistance as it turns. The starboard motor is very difficult to turn. It seems to be binding or the shaft could be sticking to the seal. My sense is that the endcap will have to go back to the cave.

    He asked about a small rod with an L-bend that is centerline aft between the main shafts. It's clearly not watertight. His question... What's it for?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Outrider View Post
    We just picked up a new Type VII SubDriver (assembled version). My son was quick to inspect the package. Here's his report.

    The (new Caswell) mission switch is an easy drop in, but a tight fit. Most of the the washers would not fit. He's got the outermost collar on tight and the rubber cover over the assembly. What's the correct set-up?

    The port motor shaft turns freely in both directions. There is obvious magnetic resistance as it turns. The starboard motor is very difficult to turn. It seems to be binding or the shaft could be sticking to the seal. My sense is that the endcap will have to go back to the cave.

    He asked about a small rod with an L-bend that is centerline aft between the main shafts. It's clearly not watertight. His question... What's it for?
    On the switch body: remove all the washers and nut, slip the switch body into the 1/4" hole through the forward bulkhead. There should only be 3/32" of threaded body projecting past the forward face of the bulkhead -- if too much, shim with thin plastic card under the switch body. If too little, dig out some resin from the inboard side. The boot goes over the switch and takes about two turns of thread to seat its o-ring onto the face of the bulkhead.

    Yeah, you have a bad shaft on one of the motors -- send the motor bulkhead back for repair.

    David,
    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

    Comment


    • #3
      I assume that all your motors, with the possible exception of those that have reduction gears, should spin like a normal mabuchi electrical motor. (I know this is a blinding flash of the obvious, but from a troubleshooting perspective, people who suspect they have mechanical binding should go no further, lest they let the blue smoke out of their motors and ESCs.)

      And the purpose for the small brass rod with the L bend that's in the center of the motor bulkhead?

      He also asked about the purpose for the schraeder valve that's also in the motor bulkhead.

      Thanks for the quick turnaround.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Outrider View Post
        I assume that all your motors, with the possible exception of those that have reduction gears, should spin like a normal mabuchi electrical motor. (I know this is a blinding flash of the obvious, but from a troubleshooting perspective, people who suspect they have mechanical binding should go no further, lest they let the blue smoke out of their motors and ESCs.)

        And the purpose for the small brass rod with the L bend that's in the center of the motor bulkhead?

        He also asked about the purpose for the schraeder valve that's also in the motor bulkhead.

        Thanks for the quick turnaround.
        The shaft/motor binding is likely the result of rough handling during the shipping process -- I'm getting too many similar problems coming in. You're not alone. and this is something only I can fix here in the shop. Sorry about this -- I'm working on different packaging schemes to minimize these occurrences.

        The L-shaped item is a place-holder for an unused servo seal. Leave it there!

        The Schrader valve in the motor bulkhead is the 'equalization valve' used to burp out the over-pressure created when either the motor bulkhead or forward bulkhead is installed. Also used as the test fitting (with the core valve element removed) over which a hose is attached to check the SD for leaks.

        David,
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

        Comment

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