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1/72 MS Bremen - Expedition Cruise ship - scratch built

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  • 1/72 MS Bremen - Expedition Cruise ship - scratch built

    Its been a while since I jumped onto a new project, finishing up HMAS Rankin was a task in its self. Whilst I have now a couple of subs to do (the Permit of Joel's to finish and the new Kilo when it arrives), to do so I need some sub driver parts that are on order, so in the last few weeks I have commenced work on my newest target scratch build a 1/72 scale version of the Hapag Lloyd expedition cruise ship Bremen.

    For details on what Bremen is - see this link.
    http://www.hl-cruises.com/redwork/do...100&node=42323

    Plans are available of this ship in 1/100 scale, from the following site in Germany, indeed you can even buy a GRP 1/100 hull.
    http://www.steinhagen-modelltechnik.de/htm/bremen.htm

    Cruise ship modeling in RC is something that is few and far between. Normally there are 1/100 scale subjects all of what would be called small cruise ships in semi kits available in Germany and elsewhere, and indeed Robbe produces a 1/100 MS Hanseactic - the sister ship of Bremen.

    In 1/72 scale Bremen is 1.54m long (60.6") x 236mm wide (9.3"). To me this is not an overly big project. Silver Cloud, which also features on this website is substantially larger, and I must say Bremen - will very much be part of my permanent home fleet. I chronic back complaint and kids that are getting older and will be coming more and more to sailing days means I am going to limit myself to subjects that are easy to manage and transport on my own, and have still have space in the car for the kids.

    Ok step one was after getting the plans blow these up to 1/72 scale. I then had the frames of the ship and keel pieces that dove tail to the frames laser cut out using 5mm hoop pine. This is a strong light weight material that lends itself very well to plank on frame construction.

    Each frame is tightly friction fitted in an inverted position along a building base board.
    The forward and aft pieces of timber you see here around each frame hold the frame in place. The completed planked hull can then be turned right side up, with the base board on top, and gently knocked off the building board.
    The dove tailed keel pieces are glued into position in pre cut notches in the frame.






    Care needs to be taken when planking the work, the build must be done evenly on both sides of the frame. Planking should always commence along the keel. The work must be repeatedly checked to ensure that none of the frames have moved sildeways

    For planking I use strip cuts of 3mm plywood. My local hardware outlet has a massive wall mounted cutting machine. As asking for a sheet of ply to be cut into strips of 12mm wide, I usually ring and make an appointment, as this is not the normal amount of cutting that the hardware store expects to do for customers.

    Ok - I goofed - no photos of the planking process but here is the end result.





    The bow and stern areas utilised surfboard foam sculpted to shape fro the right contours between cross sectional frames, a polyester filler with fibrglass strands was applied to the exterior of any foam surface.

    Needing a good clean up, the bow - note the surfboard foam blocks assisting with its forming


    The stern pre clean up.


    The interior - man I love working with wood
    Last edited by Slats; 08-01-2010, 08:51 PM.
    John Slater

    Sydney Australia

    You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
    Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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  • #2
    Next was a good clean up of the hull. This involves making sure all of the nails (that hold the planks in place whilst the exterior wood glue dries), are whacked down flush to the hull. It also involves sanding and filling any found deviations in the hulls lines.

    When the clean up is done, the hull can be laminated externally with glass cloth. I used a double layer of 225 strand with polyester resin.



    Following "green trimming" of any excess glass fibre I allow 48 hours for the hull just to sit. I provide the whole hull with a light sand and I then brush on some mixed up flow coat over the whole exterior.



    This is allowed a full 48 hours before I touch it. I then give this a sand all over to remove any brush mark deviations that might occur.

    Finally finishing off stage one, the basic hull, I apply 3 coats of acrylic automotive grade spray putty to the whole hull. This is shown below:

    John Slater

    Sydney Australia

    You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
    Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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    • #3
      Tracking back a step pre GRP laminating and here is a shot of her planked up on the bench with Starboard profile plan pinned behind her on the wall.

      John Slater

      Sydney Australia

      You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
      Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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      • #4
        Here is some interesting news about Bremen - and the limitations of help when wandering into southern waters around Antartica.
        http://www.odt.co.nz/news/national/4...ue-one-longest

        Note the photo in this article, hate to be on any surface ship, heaving about like this.
        J
        John Slater

        Sydney Australia

        You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
        Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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        • #5
          About time I updated this thread...

          Some ship details courtesy of Hapag Lloyd

          Size Ship:……..………………………………………6,752 tons
          Rating:…………………………………………….. 5 star
          Cruise Line:………………………………………….. Hapag-Lloyd Cruises
          Former Names:………………………………………. Frontier Spirit (Frontier Spirit Cruises)
          Builder:………………………………………………. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (Japan)
          Original Cost:………………………………………... $42 million
          Entered Service:………………………………………November 1990/November 1993
          Registry:………………………………………………The Bahamas
          Length (ft/m):…..…………………………………… 365.8/111.51
          Beam (ft/m):…………………………………………. 55.7/17.00
          Draft (ft/m):………………………………………….. 15.7/4.80
          Propulsion/Propellers:……………………………….. diesel (4,855kW)/2
          Iceclass:……………………………………………….1AS
          Passenger Decks:…………………………………….. 6
          Total Crew:…………………………………………....100
          Passengers (lower beds/all berths):…………………...164/184
          Passenger Space Ratio (lower beds/all berths):……….41.1/36.6
          Crew/Passenger Ratio (lower beds/all berths):……….1.7/1.9
          Navigation Officers:………………………………….European
          Cabins (total):…………………………………………82 (80 cabins and 2 suites)
          Size Range (sq. ft/m):…………………………………174.3-322.9/16.2-30.0
          Cabins (outside view):………………………………..82
          Cabins (interior/no view):…………………………….0
          Cabins (for one person):………………………………0
          Cabins (with private balcony):………………………..18
          Cabins (wheelchair accessible):………………………2
          Cabin Current:………………………………………..110 and 220 volts
          Elevators:……………………………………………..2
          Casino:………………………………………………..No
          Slot Machine:…………………………………………No
          Swimming Pools (outdoors):…………………………1
          Swimming Pools (indoors):…………………………..0
          Whirlpools:…………………………………………...0
          Fitness Center:……………………………….……….Yes
          Sauna/Steam Room:………………………….………Yes/No
          Massage:……………………………………….……..No
          Self-service Launderette:……………………………..No
          Lecture/Film Room:………………………………….Yes (seats 164)
          Library:……………………………………………….Yes (open 24 hours)
          Zodiacs:………………………………………………12
          Helicopter Pad:...……………………………………..Yes
          Classification Society:………………………………..Lloyd’s Register

          OVERALL SCORE 1,461 (OUT OF A POSSIBLE 2,000 POINTS)
          BERLITZ’S RATINGS:
          Possible Achieved
          Ship 500 349
          Accommodation 200 150
          Food 400 298
          Service 400 311
          Entertainment N/A N/A
          Cruise 500 353


          Accommodation: This comes in only four different configurations. All cabins have an outside view (the cabins on the lowest deck have portholes; all others have good-sized picture windows).

          All of the cabins are well equipped for the size of the vessel. Each cabin features wood accenting, a color television (small), telephone, refrigerator (soft/drinks are provided and replenished daily, at no charge), vanity desk (with 110v American-style and 220v European-style electrical sockets) and sitting area with small drink tables. Cabins have either twin beds (convertible to a queen-sized bed, but with individual European duvets) or double bed, according to location. There is also a small indented area for outerwear and rubber boots, while a small drawer above the refrigerator unit provides warmth when needed for such things as wet socks and gloves.

          Each cabin has a private bathroom (of the “me first, you next” variety) with a tiled floor, shower enclosure (with curtain), toiletries’ cupboard, washbasin (located quite low, as the ship was built in Japan) and low-height toilet (vacuum type, with delay), and a decent amount of under-sink storage space (there’s also an electrical socket for shavers). Large towels and 100 percent cotton bathrobes are provided for all passengers, as is a range of personal toiletry items (shampoo, body lotion, and shower gel, soap and shower cap).

          Each cabin has a moderate amount of (illuminated) closet space (large enough for two weeks for two persons, but very tight for more than that cruise length) although the drawer space is limited (suitcases can be stored under the beds). The beds feature European cotton duvets. Some Sun Deck and Bridge Deck cabins also have a small balcony (the first expedition cruise vessel to have them) with blue plastic (easily cleanable) decking and wooden handrail, but no exterior light. The balconies, which have two teak chairs and drink tables, are, however, quite small and narrow, with part partitions and doors that open outwards onto the balcony.

          Two Sun Deck suites have a separate lounge area with sofa and coffee table, bedroom (with large wall closet), large walk-in closet, and bathroom with a bathtub and two washbasins.

          Dining: The dining room features open seating when operating for mixed German and International passenger cruises, and open seating for breakfast and lunch and one seating for dinner (with assigned seats) when operated only as German-speaking cruises. It is fairly attractive, with pleasing décor and colors; it also has big picture windows. The food is extremely good, and made with high-quality ingredients. Although the portions are small, the presentation is appealing to the eye. There is always an excellent choice of freshly made breads and pastries, and a good selection of cheeses and fruits. Dinner typically includes a choice of two appetizers, two soups, an entremets (in-between course), two entrees (main courses) and two or three desserts, plus a cheese board. There is always a vegetarian specialty, as well as a healthy (light) eating option. The service is also good, with smartly dressed bi-lingual (German and English speaking) waiters and waitresses.

          As an alternative to the dining room, breakfast and luncheon buffets are available in “The Club” or outside on the Lido Deck (weather permitting), where “The Starboard Bar/Grill is also operated for hamburgers and other grilled food items.

          General Comments: This purpose-built expedition cruise vessel (formerly Frontier Spirit, for the now defunct US-based Frontier Cruises) has a handsome, wide, though squat, contemporary profile and decent equipment. Its wide beam provides decent stability and the vessel’s long cruising range and ice-hardened hull provides the ship with access to remote destinations. The ship carries the highest ice classification for passenger vessels. In 1993 Hapag-Lloyd spent $2 million in refurbishment costs to reconfigure the restaurant and make other changes to the ship, and, in another refurbishment in 2000, the hull color was changed from blue to white. This is one of the few ships that will allow you to take a tour of the engine room. It is the sixth ship to bear the name Bremen for Hapag-Lloyd; the others being introduced in 1858 (Bremen I), 1897 (Bremen II), 1923 (Bremen III), 1929 (Bremen IV) and 1959 (Bremen V).
          Zero-discharge of waste matter is fiercely practiced; this means that absolutely nothing is discharged into the ocean that does not meet with the international conventions on ocean pollution (MARPOL). All the equipment for in-depth marine and share excursions is provided including a boot-washing station with three water hoses and boot cleaning brushes.

          An open bridge policy applies. There is almost a wrap-around-walking deck (you must go up and down the steps at the front of the deck to complete the “wrap”). A large open deck aft of the mast provides a good viewing platform (also useful for sunbathing on warm-weather cruises). There is a small fitness room, and a decent sized sauna.
          The ship has a good number of public rooms for its size, including a forward-facing observation lounge/lecture room (with portside bar), and a main lounge (called the Club) with a high ceiling, bandstand, dance floor and large bar, and an adjacent library with 12 bookcases (most books are in German).

          Bremen features superb, well-planned destination-intensive itineraries with good documentation, port information and maps. The ship provides a good degree of comfort (although it is not as luxurious as the slightly larger sister ship Hanseatic). There is also a reception desk (open 24 hours a day), a fine array of expert lecturers, a friendly crew, and no annoying “elevator” music played in the hallways or on the open decks all add to the enjoyable cruise experience you should have aboard this ship.

          Bremen is a very comfortable, practical, and unpretentious expedition cruise vessel (perhaps arguably a better expedition vessel than sister ship Hanseatic, and, although not as luxurious in its interiors and appointments, the ship has a very loyal following).

          Cruises aboard this ship will provide you with a fine learning and expedition experience, and operates particularly well when featuring Antarctic cruises (all shore landings and tours are included, as is seasickness medication). The onboard ambience is completely casual, comfortable, unstuffy (no tux needed), friendly, and very accommodating. Passengers also appreciate the fact that there are no mindless parlour games, no television (on expedition cruises, although there are videos daily) no bingo, no horseracing, no casino, and no music in hallways or on open decks.

          Arctic/Antarctic Cruises: When the ship goes to cold weather/ice areas such as the Arctic or Antarctic, red parkas (waterproof outdoor jackets) are supplied, as are waterproof rubber (Wellington) boots. You should, however, take some waterproof trousers and several pairs of thick socks, plus “thermal” underwear. Each of the fleet of 12 Zodiacs (rubber-inflatable landing craft) is named after a place: Amazon, Antarctic, Asmat, Bora Bora, Cape Horn, Deception, Jan Mayen, Luzon, Pitcairn, San Blas, Spitzbergen and Ushuaia. On Arctic and Antarctic cruises, it is particularly pleasing to go to the bridge wings late at night to stargaze under pollution free skies (the watch officers will be pleased to show you the night skies).

          Note that special sailings may be under the auspices of various tour operators, although the ship is operated by Hapag-Lloyd Cruises. Thus, your fellow passengers may well be from many different countries. Insurance, port taxes and all staff gratuities are typically included in the cruise fare, and an expedition cruise logbook is also typically provided at the end of each expedition cruise for all participants – a superb reminder of what’s been seen and done during the course of your adventure experience. The onboard currency is the euro.

          Weak Points: The ship does not have a “bulbous bow” and so is liable to deep pitching
          in some sea conditions (it does, however, have stabilizers).

          The dining room has 12 pillars placed in inconvenient positions (the result of old shipbuilding techniques).

          The swimming pool is very small, as is the open deck space around it, although there are both shaded and open areas.

          In-cabin announcements cannot be turned off (on cruises in the Arctic and Antarctic, announcements are often made at or before 7am on days when shore landing are permitted). Sadly, the ship was not built with good cabin insulation, the result being that you can hear your neighbours brushing their hair.

          Bathrooms are subject to gurgling plumbing noises (between the washbasin and shower enclosure) due to their design and construction.

          There is only one boot washing station (two would be better, and more in keeping with the requirements of an expedition cruise vessel).


          IMO number: 8907424
          John Slater

          Sydney Australia

          You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
          Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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          • #6
            Here is a nice photo of a static 1/100 scale model of Bremen at the Uberseemuseum Bremen (Bremen museum of Natural History)

            This shows the original Bremen livery before she went all white. The helicopter deck markings are visible.



            I think she'd look good in either of the two.

            The White version has a more subtle deck markings for the helo pad, as it doubles now as sun / observation deck. It would be nice to have a chopper on board on the model. In fact the aerials around the deck up top (save for the mast) all are on pivots that mean they can be lowered in a matter of seconds as can the lighting cord that runs over the pad and the railings surrounding the deck.

            Just working out the electrical layout.
            I have the new version of the Robbe -Futaba F16C Boat N Truck radio spec'd out with modules and Navy Twin stick controller- so potentially I could go ridiculous and have 24 channels.

            She has quite large retracting stabilisers, and whilst I probably would not go to the trouble of rigging in a sub leveller to act as gyro via a Y and two servos for each one's action, I could rig in the extension / retraction system. In my experience active stabilsers that work like the real thing don't work to the degree that you notice improved stability. Deployed stabilisers however do have some anti-roll properties so best to fit them so they can extend at a minimum.

            But she's an interesting ship - she nearly sank on her maiden voyage off Fiji when a cyclone dragged her across a reef, and then she near went under again when a 35m wave (yes 35 metre wave) nearly rolled her in the Southern Ocean - she founded about with a 40 degree list and water on board for hours whilst the crew frantically worked on restoring propulsion.

            Here is some details about Bremen's freak wave near death.....
            http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/20 ... wave.shtml

            Interestingly the Calendonian Star was hit a few days later in the same area by another 30m freak wave .

            Here is the Bremen Captain's log entry of the incident:


            Yes in German - the key thing here is the wave height is 35m!
            The wind measure is 12-13 - if its knots is nothing - I am pretty sure its the Beaufort scale which would mean 64 to 85 knots. The air pressure in mbar is low (989) which is associated with a deep low and would be typical pressure of a severe storm.
            John Slater

            Sydney Australia

            You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
            Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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            • #7
              As you can see I put work on the hull to one side and commenced work on the Superstructure. I find if you get the ****s with a process its best to come back to it and do something else.

              The windows and doors were all laser cut.
              A great saving in time and a boon for accuracy.









              Showing the superstructure in an inverted position. By eliminating internal decks and replacing the structure with a space frame (styrene rods), you can save bucket loads of weight, without compromising strength. The superstructure tends to be in the end almost like a cathedral , (a big open space). This type of construction is also beneficial for installing windows from the inside after all external painting is complete.

              John Slater

              Sydney Australia

              You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
              Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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              • #8
                Nice work John! I'd like to build something like that in the future! It's playing at the back of my mind some time now!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bassplayer1 View Post
                  Nice work John! I'd like to build something like that in the future! It's playing at the back of my mind some time now!
                  Thanks Yannis.

                  You should do it. You have exceptional talent with Subs, I'd love to see what you would do with target.
                  Nothing like building a target once in a while.

                  Best
                  John
                  Last edited by Slats; 09-27-2010, 04:00 AM.
                  John Slater

                  Sydney Australia

                  You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                  Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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                  • #10
                    Time to well and truly update this thread. A lot of the work has been internal, I have fitted her shafts, rudders, bow thruster, and also laminated the inside with GRP, fitted her bilge keels and retractable stabilisers, which in my case stay retracted in the hull, as its a fools errand to fit working ones. If they have any effect at all even linked to a nice sub leveller you can't notice it. Then it was a case of tidying up all the in hull openings, which is complete. A little more hull detail still needs to be added before I can paint the hull in her final primer, then finished coats. The painting of the hull needs to happen before all the within hull window are installed from the inside. All of this can happen prior to superstructure completion as the superstructure is a completely removable module.







                    Best
                    J
                    John Slater

                    Sydney Australia

                    You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                    Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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                    • #11
                      Damn John! You do excellent work.

                      Are you doing this full time now or is still just a part-time hobby on your part?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks Chuck,
                        No its all hobby, always has been, and unlike some who are far less productive I have never advertised myself as a hobby vendor or business and never got confused between the two.
                        I don't need the ego stroked, or the esteem rescued by masses.
                        Ain't it amazing Chuck how empty vessels make the most noise.

                        J
                        Last edited by Slats; 02-16-2011, 07:35 AM. Reason: spellin
                        John Slater

                        Sydney Australia

                        You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                        Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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                        • #13
                          Hi time to get Bremen wet.

                          Here you can see tank testing, and with the ship teetered in the tank the throttles are opened up to the max and the amps monitored. Heat is also monitored.
                          I discovered a slight kink in the drive train universal of the port motor that lead to higher fuel consumption (2.67 amps) cf (2.04 amps on the starboard motor).
                          Re positioning the port motor by a poofteenth vastly improved the port figures to match the starboard side. - Yes universals can take kinks or angles in the drive train but you will pay a price for that in amps. I try no matter what the vessel to get the shaft alignment as near perfectly straight with the motor axle.


                          The basic setup - the wiring herein is only to support the sea trial. A more permanent switch and wiring arrangement will be installed closer to completion.
                          All hull windows are taped up with FG adhesive tape - not waterproof but splash proof - sufficient for a sea trial.


                          Total amps (average half hour tethered run)


                          Port engine flat stick fuel consumption:


                          Starboard engine flat stick fuel consumption:


                          Both motors are insane for this vessel. When I first ran this she did a comfortable 40+ scale knots and rooster tail. The motors are Ford Bulher fan blowers, around the size of a 540 can motor, but with moderate to low amps and little heat.
                          I added heatsinks to both motors and a 12v DC computer cooling fan (draws 200mA) to ensure a comfortable inner environment. Air is sucked in through the funnel, blasted across the motors and exits via vents in the quarter deck.

                          Sea trials saw me runing the ship no faster than half a head as again the motors were just too grunty.
                          John Slater

                          Sydney Australia

                          You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                          Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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                          • #14
                            More sea trial photos











                            Last edited by Slats; 03-13-2011, 06:25 PM. Reason: spellin
                            John Slater

                            Sydney Australia

                            You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                            Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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                            • #15
                              By the way the Raboesch bow thruster is superb.
                              John Slater

                              Sydney Australia

                              You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                              Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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