French Suffren Class SSN

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  • Akula54
    Lieutenant, Junior Grade
    • Jul 2011
    • 29

    French Suffren Class SSN

    Here's some pics of new french SSN, the Suffren.

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    Sea trials at Cherbourg

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    Arrived at Toulon's Naval base on 07/13/2020

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  • trout
    Admiral
    • Jul 2011
    • 3539

    #2
    X-tail and interesting, small planes - designed for speed? Or does the design of the rudder as a whole make it more efficient? Excellent photos, thank you for posting!
    If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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    • coryhenry
      Lieutenant Commander
      • Jul 2020
      • 156

      #3
      Also a cool sail retractable cover, would like to see that replicated in a model :)

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      • RCSubGuy
        Welcome to my underwater realm!
        • Aug 2009
        • 1762

        #4
        Those rudders are crazy! In practice, x-tails are about 40% more efficient than standard cruciform, so perhaps they can get away with the control surfaces 40% smaller?

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        • a1965l
          Lieutenant Commander
          • Apr 2020
          • 147

          #5
          Its interesting that there's a slot in front of the control surface.. You generally only see those in high lift devices, they prevent airflow separation at high angles of attack. I would think they get noisy, though.
          "It does not take so many words to speak the truth" Chief Joseph

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          • Akula54
            Lieutenant, Junior Grade
            • Jul 2011
            • 29

            #6
            Originally posted by a1965l
            Its interesting that there's a slot in front of the control surface.. You generally only see those in high lift devices, they prevent airflow separation at high angles of attack. I would think they get noisy, though.
            Don't know if it's noisy, but you can see same device on Le Redoutable class SSBN (here in the Cherbourg Museum).

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            • Albacore 569
              Commander
              • Sep 2020
              • 301

              #7
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              Semi-balanced control surfaces with forward fixed surfaces in front with their own hydrodynamic characteristics to smooth the flow for the moving surfaces aft of it - seems a distinctive common French design characteristic. Some may argue for the unbalanced or all moving surfaces too - common on other navies for control effectiveness and silencing.

              Perhaps the French method helps create the control forces needed with less over all movement? Avoiding larger movements that induce more flow noise?

              Semi-balanced surfaces also I imagine puts less loads on the boats hydraulic systems too - less work for the same purpose. Like in all designs, everything is a trade off - compromise which has the most appealing features to the designer for the mission.

              It is remarkable the French even extend this characteristic to Suffren's X-stern too, which seems to reflect just how much they believe in this arrangement's effectiveness.

              Note also in the top photo the t
              wisted rudder surface which matches the water flow from propeller to reduce cavitation. (Arethuse class Museum boat Argonaute -early 1950's design) . It shows a great deal of sophistication & understanding of hydrodynamics I'm sure other navies are well aware of too, but the French seem to wish to take it to next degree.

              As modelers, we are all looking for somethings on a model subject that's different.

              Steve
              Last edited by Albacore 569; 03-02-2022, 01:02 AM.

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              • Akula54
                Lieutenant, Junior Grade
                • Jul 2011
                • 29

                #8
                Suffren arrived in Faslane, Sotland

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                Francois
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