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1/150 scale and 1/100 scale Typhoons

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  • 1/150 scale and 1/100 scale Typhoons

    Andy "Subculture" just pointed out to me the other day that there is this 1/150 Scale Typhoon. Note they also do a 1/100 version.

    It looks like it needs a set of props, scopes, - but could be a nice sized model.
    Would a 3.5" twin screw SD fit this twin screw setup in 1/150 scale or 1/100?

    http://www.jet-drive.de/index.php?op...d=57&Itemid=17

    Best

    John
    John Slater

    Sydney Australia

    You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
    Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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  • #2
    3.5" will fit in either, although I have a sneaking feeling the cylinder may project above the waterline a bit on 1/150th version. It would get 'lost' in a 1/100 boat!
    DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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    • #3
      Yeah but would the shaft exits align with the screws?

      J
      John Slater

      Sydney Australia

      You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
      Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



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      • #4
        Should be about 2.25" from the bottom of the hull to the shaft centreline, so it should clear it okay.
        DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Slats View Post
          Andy "Subculture" just pointed out to me the other day that there is this 1/150 Scale Typhoon. Note they also do a 1/100 version.

          It looks like it needs a set of props, scopes, - but could be a nice sized model.
          Would a 3.5" twin screw SD fit this twin screw setup in 1/150 scale or 1/100?

          http://www.jet-drive.de/index.php?op...d=57&Itemid=17

          Best

          John
          Yes, John, the 3.5" SubDriver is a perfect match for the 1/100 TYPHOON (close enough to 1/96 scale as to not matter). Now offered as a kit, that SD can be built with enough ballast tank to get this boat up to its designed waterline in surfaced trim.

          The existing GATO, 2.5" SubDriver would be a great match for the 1/150 TYPHOON -- it has a lot of reserve buoyancy in that ballast tank, something needed for the exceptionally high freeboard of the TYPHOON SSBN. I assume the manufacturer is not an idiot with the glass work and the wall thickness does not exceed 3/32".

          By the way, I'm finishing up tooling for an improved (something had to change in the course of 20 years of production, improvements and sales) 3.5" SubDriver, pictures below. The new arrangement -- in no small part occurring do to your non-stop badgering and threats of violence -- features a single cylinder arrangement as found in our other SubDriver's: A forward dry-space for the battery and mission switch, a central ballast tank (with centrally running conduit tube), and an after dry space with attached motor bulkhead. These will be offered as kits so the end-user can adjust compartment lengths to suite his specific needs. Presented are the masters for a single motor, single-shaft and a dual motor, dual-shaft motor bulkhead. Note that I validate all mechanical and structural connections and function on the production masters -- if it works as a master, then I'm assured that the production cast resin parts will also work. This practice avoids expensive 'modifications' later.

          David

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          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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          • #6
            Getting the shafts to align across the width is another matter though. You could use one to one chains or belts. Or make up a custom job with two separate tubes for the motors.
            DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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            • #7
              Thanks Andy, thought about that - but doesn't wet applications like this compress the water in the gears, thus increasing load on the shafts?



              Thanks David,
              I am glad I can contribute - not sure about the physical violence but its great to see the 3.5" Sub drivers updated. I'll check out with the manufacturer as to the wall thickness, it seems a bit strange how the hull's offered by the manufacturer comes segmented, no doubt that would aid shipping, but its a shame its not a continuous single lower piece.

              J
              John Slater

              Sydney Australia

              You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
              Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                i wish their Victor was more scale
                Next time someone points out it takes 42 muscles to frown, point out it will only take 4 muscles to b1tch slap them if they tell you how mnay muscles you need to smile:pop

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                • #9
                  Hi Albion,
                  I use to like the Victor III, but my experience with several Alfa's tell me that the manoeuvring of this boat with its significant uprights ahead of relatively small rudders would be very problematic.

                  J
                  John Slater

                  Sydney Australia

                  You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                  Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



                  sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Slats View Post
                    Hi Albion,
                    I use to like the Victor III, but my experience with several Alfa's tell me that the manoeuvring of this boat with its significant uprights ahead of relatively small rudders would be very problematic.

                    J
                    Yeah, those big vertical stabilizers kill the yaw rate.

                    David,
                    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      At the risk of discussing something that's not gonna happen, a full flying lower rudder might be only way
                      Next time someone points out it takes 42 muscles to frown, point out it will only take 4 muscles to b1tch slap them if they tell you how mnay muscles you need to smile:pop

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Possibly Albion, but back on topic....the catalog for the KMBJET Typhoon's is interesting viewing.
                        Here's the link - page 52 has the Sub details, is it me or is there something a bit out of scale about the sub especially around the sail?
                        http://www.jet-drive.de/preisliste/KMB-Katalog.pdf

                        Here is a bit of info they supply regarding the materials used:
                        "KMB hulls are handmade from epoxy and fiberglass cloth with a layer of gel coat. The quality and attention is the same given
                        to the making of full size crafts. The gel coat is between .010 to .015 inches thick and followed by three to five layers of
                        fiberglass cloth and epoxy.

                        All the hulls we make are joined with the deck in the mold before the hardening of the epoxy is complete. Then these hull/
                        deck units are tempered for 24 hours in order to achieve maximum strength. The mold release agent is polyvinyl alcohol and
                        has to be washed from the surface with hot water before sanding or painting."
                        John Slater

                        Sydney Australia

                        You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                        Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The Kehrer hulls are nicely made. They're not the last word in scale fidelity, but they get very close. Interestingly, their little Alfa, which I think is a natty little boat, has full flying rudder surfaces. A little scale sacrifice in exchange for a boat that should turn on a sixpence is worth it IMO.

                          Gears running in water shouldn't be a problem. You should leave them open (e.g. no casing), else they act as a pump. The gears in my old mini gearbox run completely immersed in oil.

                          I was referring to using chains or belts- same difference, although for the latter you might need to drill some vent holes in the pulleys for the water to squish through.
                          Last edited by Subculture; 11-12-2010, 06:09 AM.
                          DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

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                          • #14
                            Thanks Andy
                            J
                            John Slater

                            Sydney Australia

                            You would not steal a wallet so don't steal people's livelihood.
                            Think of that before your buy "cheap" pirated goods or download others work protected by copyright. Theft is theft.



                            sigpic

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Subculture View Post
                              The Kehrer hulls are nicely made. They're not the last word in scale fidelity, but they get very close. Interestingly, their little Alfa, which I think is a natty little boat, has full flying rudder surfaces. A little scale sacrifice in exchange for a boat that should turn on a sixpence is worth it IMO.

                              Gears running in water shouldn't be a problem. You should leave them open (e.g. no pump), else they act as a pump. The gears in my old mini gearbox run completely immersed in oil.

                              I was referring to using chains or belts- same difference, although for the latter you might need to drill some vent holes in the pulleys for the water to squish through.
                              An aside:

                              don't use precision ground, tight-tolerance matched gears in the wet -- you'll hammer them!

                              David,
                              "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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