Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and expectations

Hello, and welcome to the forums at the Nautilus Drydocks, formerly Sub-driver.com!

We welcome anyone with a passion for submarines and a desire to learn and share knowledge about this fascinating hobby. Use of these forums indicates your intention to abide by our code of conduct:


1. No spam. All automated messages, advertisements, and links to competitor websites will be deleted immediately.

2. Please post in relevant sub-forums only. Messages posted in the wrong topic area will be removed and placed in the correct sub-forum by moderators.

3. Respect other users. No flaming or abusing fellow forum members. Users who continue to post inflammatory, abusive comments will be deleted from the forum after or without a warning.

4. No threats or harassment of other users will be tolerated. Any instance of threatening or harassing behavior is grounds for deletion from the forums.

5. No profanity or pornography is allowed. Posts containing adult material will be deleted.

6. No re-posting of copyrighted materials or other illegal content is allowed. Any posts containing illegal content or copyrighted materials will be deleted.
See more
See less

Akula II

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Akula II

    This is an abridged build thread - because I am usually too impatient to stop and take photographs. This is one of Vladimir's Scale Ships Akula and it is a beauty. It comes with all kinds of goodies and is a joy to work on.

    PK. So it arrived and I went ballistic on its arse and by the time I got my head up it looked like this.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000644.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	90.9 KB
ID:	103248

    I started with a large bit of ply and glued some 120 grit sand paper to it. That allowed me to get a good fit between the upper and lower hull pieces. Then a bit of Dremeling and, vola, le "Z" cut was complete. The bow was filled and sanded and then it looked like this.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000652.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	91.5 KB
ID:	103249

    I ditched the (5mm) stern tube and shaft that came with the kit because it was HUGE and replaced it with a much more usable 4mm version with some really nice self lubricating bearings that came from Engel in Germany. Although the upper and lower hull halves went together quite well the profile of the rear extension was wrong and needed some quite aggressive sanding to get it looking right.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000643.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	91.5 KB
ID:	103250
    Fat - in all the wrong places.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000648.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	84.6 KB
ID:	103251 Looking better
    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000649.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	94.0 KB
ID:	103252 And, finally the right shape.

    This photo also shows the bearings for the stern planes. The kit comes with very accurate appendages which are precisely drilled and therefore quite tight. The shafts are all 3mm and produced quite a bit of binding until I ran a 3.2mm bit thought them to loosen everything up. I did the laser alignment thing to get everything square, drilled the holes oversize and epoxied some bearings into the holes. Then made some simple bell cranks and hooked it all up like this.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000661.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	91.1 KB
ID:	103253
    I fixed the appendages with super glue and then drilled them to fix some 2mm rod for added strength. Seemed to work OK. The bell crank was initially designed to allow both upper and lower rudder to work in tandem without having to mate them way back in the stern tube but, it produced an unintended benefit by allowing me to lengthen the arm and get a (slight) torque advantage in the linkage. It also brought the end of the pushrods inline with the SD outputs.

  • #2
    There is so much detail on the kit that it seemed a shame to waste it. So I decided that some working bollards and capstans would be good, and a working rescue buoy, and working lights and working masts, and working crew and tiny, working seagulls ****ting on the working towed array etc etc. Carried away? Well yes, but why not give a go and see what happens. The first thing that happened was that all those vents, grills and grates had to be fitted. No mean feat and a quick look at the available photographs shows that all those little bits are quite obvious and not necessarily flush or "neat". So this happened:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000651.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	90.0 KB
ID:	93436Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000650.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	87.6 KB
ID:	93437Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000657.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	87.7 KB
ID:	93438Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000654.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	109.8 KB
ID:	93439Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000655.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	92.7 KB
ID:	93440Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000653.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	89.3 KB
ID:	93441

    Comment


    • #3
      The capstan and bollards presented an opportunity to improvise a bit so I made a simple lift system that raised them all when the boat was at normal free board and gently lowered them as she sank deeper. A squirt of high viscosity silicone oil slowed the transition down to a quite reasonable scale appearance. The mechanism looks like this:Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000659.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	87.9 KB
ID:	93442

      and the capstan and bollards look like this:
      Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000666.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	92.9 KB
ID:	93443

      Comment


      • #4
        You, sir, are a crazy-man! I love this ****!

        MORE!!!!

        M
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

        Comment


        • #5
          OK, smart-guy ... I was just at the LED thread and saw your finished AKULA. How did you do the barnicles????? Must know, now!

          M
          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Aye aye Sir. This kit comes with the most detailed set of dry transfers (and included a duplicate set by the way), a full sized set of plans and a colour painting guide. So I did the standard paint job and it looked like a Christmas cake! Too clean, too precise and way too unused. So I:
            1. Dry brushed it with deep charcoal pigment powder;
            2. Over sprayed the hull with an olive green mist;
            3. Dry brushed some deep grey and brown pigment over the upper hull; and
            4. Threw some sand at it.
            after which it looks like this:Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000662.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	100.4 KB
ID:	93448

            Comment


            • #7
              Like it, very nice. Certainly better than mine is going to be. Have you got any close ups of the sail and the mast with the light. Also how did you replicate the SOKS sensor on the front of the sail.

              More pics please,

              Peter

              Comment


              • #8
                Next some sea (bath actually) trials to confirm that everything was working OK. The 3.5"SD from my Skipjack works a treat. Very little adjustment was necessary to get the boat sitting at neutral buoyancy with just the top of the sail right at the surface. It make a very satisfying slurp on surfacing as well. There was a small problem with trapped air in the bow so I made a small air letter outer and a cover that flops down over it.
                Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000681.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	89.7 KB
ID:	93449 Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000682.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	90.7 KB
ID:	93450

                Comment


                • #9
                  A bit more grey dry brushing and some rust.Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000667.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	92.7 KB
ID:	93451

                  The sand is still raw and looks a bit odd but it gets better.
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000670.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	97.6 KB
ID:	93452Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000671.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	93.4 KB
ID:	93453
                  Next came the green line and a bit of random colouring of the barnacles. Yellow, red, brown and a final skim of black.
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0776.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	93.1 KB
ID:	93454Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0777.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	90.5 KB
ID:	93455Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0779.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	92.1 KB
ID:	93456

                  Next a bit of brown oil paint mixed in around the water line with the green and the rust followed by a final flat coat.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000683.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	93.0 KB
ID:	93457Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000676.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	93.7 KB
ID:	93458Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000692.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	90.2 KB
ID:	93459

                  One of the few things not included in the kit is a mast and light (anchor light?) that sit on top of the sail. After fiddling around I came up with this:
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000672.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	94.8 KB
ID:	93460Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000673.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	93.9 KB
ID:	93461 which was made with a .8mm LED.
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	chip-sizes.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	13.8 KB
ID:	93462
                  At present the boat looks like this. A bit more to do on the hull, some radio masts and the doors for the masts. Unfortunately there was not enough room above the SD to allow for retracting masts which is disappointing.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000685.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	89.7 KB
ID:	93463

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Peter W View Post
                    Like it, very nice. Certainly better than mine is going to be. Have you got any close ups of the sail and the mast with the light. Also how did you replicate the SOKS sensor on the front of the sail.

                    More pics please,

                    Peter
                    Hi Peter,

                    The mast and light are pretty simple. I got a .8mm LED from a model train supply company and mounted it on a 1/16 alloy tube (couldn't get stainless steel unfortunately) and fixed a small clear plastic top over it. All done. Looks OK as well. The SOKS sensor on the sail was a lot easier than it looked at first. There is a small brass plate supplied that has the mounting holes predrilled. I just stuck it to the front of the sail and drilled .5mm holes through it into the sail. Then mounted .5mm brass rod in each hole, glued them and cut them off to the right length. Its not perfect but if does look reasonable.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
                      OK, smart-guy ... I was just at the LED thread and saw your finished AKULA. How did you do the barnicles????? Must know, now!

                      M
                      Sand, Your Worship. Its graded and dried and sold in art shops. The advantage is that the uniform size adds to the barnacle look. The grains are .5mm which should be about right for barnacles at 1/96 scale. Quite a few of the grains break off as well which adds a wonderful depth to the hull by exposing whatever was printed on first. There also some crushed pumice in there as well to give some body between the barnacles. A quick skim over them with a black wax crayon leaves tiny black spots on the top of each one that look just like a barnacle's gob.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HardRock View Post
                        Sand, Your Worship. Its graded and dried and sold in art shops. The advantage is that the uniform size adds to the barnacle look. The grains are .5mm which should be about right for barnacles at 1/96 scale. Quite a few of the grains break off as well which adds a wonderful depth to the hull by exposing whatever was printed on first. There also some crushed pumice in there as well to give some body between the barnacles. A quick skim over them with a black wax crayon leaves tiny black spots on the top of each one that look just like a barnacle's gob.
                        You've taken me back to school. Wonderful stuff, HardRock. Thanks.

                        M
                        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The subtle colors and nice rust really comes together for the top half, but the icing on the cake is the lower half. The scum line is done very well and the barnicles (which at first I was not sure I liked) grew on me (pun intended). Now as I study it more, it is a great effect. Look forward to more photos and seeing it in water. Excellent work and inspiring!
                          If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by trout View Post
                            The subtle colors and nice rust really comes together for the top half, but the icing on the cake is the lower half. The scum line is done very well and the barnicles (which at first I was not sure I liked) grew on me (pun intended). Now as I study it more, it is a great effect. Look forward to more photos and seeing it in water. Excellent work and inspiring!

                            So Trout, i am not the only one who thinks that Akula paint job is amazing.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
                              You've taken me back to school. Wonderful stuff, HardRock. Thanks.

                              M
                              Pot, this is kettle, over. Its all your fault actually. The colours on this thing were lifted directly from your 1/96 Skipjack (which is, not surprisingly) the best finished model that I have. I've seen lots of photographs of it and its sister ships on this site but they come no where near to showing the subtly of the paint job you did no that boat. Seeing it "in the flesh" was a revelation and an inspiration. I'm flattered that you like the Akula.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X