Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and expectations

Hello, and welcome to the forums at the Nautilus Drydocks, formerly Sub-driver.com!

We welcome anyone with a passion for submarines and a desire to learn and share knowledge about this fascinating hobby. Use of these forums indicates your intention to abide by our code of conduct:


1. No spam. All automated messages, advertisements, and links to competitor websites will be deleted immediately.

2. Please post in relevant sub-forums only. Messages posted in the wrong topic area will be removed and placed in the correct sub-forum by moderators.

3. Respect other users. No flaming or abusing fellow forum members. Users who continue to post inflammatory, abusive comments will be deleted from the forum after or without a warning.

4. No threats or harassment of other users will be tolerated. Any instance of threatening or harassing behavior is grounds for deletion from the forums.

5. No profanity or pornography is allowed. Posts containing adult material will be deleted.

6. No re-posting of copyrighted materials or other illegal content is allowed. Any posts containing illegal content or copyrighted materials will be deleted.
See more
See less

1/96 Type 212 - U36

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1/96 Type 212 - U36

    Meine Herren,
    Wie es scheint, ist ein U-Boot nicht genug für mich. Nun brauche ich etwas Hilfe. Auf den Vorschlag von Mr. Merriman hin habe ich mit der Arbeit am schönen 1/96 Klasse 212 begonnen. Er war so freundlich, mir einen teilweise gebauten Rumpf mit Kleinteilesatz zu überlassen. Ich beabsichtige, ihn als das aktuelle U-36 der Deutschen Bundesmarine zu bauen.


    I'm sorry, I'm getting ahead of myself...

    Gentlemen,
    It would seem that one submarine was not enough for me. I am now beyond help. At the suggestion of Mr. Merriman, I have begun work on the beautiful 1/96 Type 212. He was kind enough to give me a partially started hull and fittings kit. My intent is to build her into the modern-day U-36 of the German Navy.

    Credit where credit is due, I must thank our friend Jörg for helping with that translation. I took a bit of German back in high school, but my proficiency has faded as the years have gone by.

    That said, I was lucky enough to come into possession of this lovely little boat when I visited David and Ellie last month. It really is a superbly engineered kit, and reading through its accompanying cabal report, it's clear that it was very thoughtfully designed to be as close to a shake & bake static-diving R/C scale model as you can produce. I say that with all due respect, of course. David made the task that much easier for me by giving me the mostly-completed hull and a fittings kit, so my task at this point is basically rigging it all up and finishing it. I had a good amount of free time this weekend as I was feeling under the weather, so I laid it all out on my dining room table and decided to see what kind of a mess I could make of things. Without further ado, I present to you U-36 (S186)


    Starting with the already cut and joined hull pieces that David gave me. I promptly bottled the dust from his workshop and will be selling it as a good-luck potion for those interested. Kind of like those people who snort powdered Rhino horn for virility.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	57233334442__A1D2DE33-6028-438D-B7D3-D32AE193CBCB.jpg Views:	1 Size:	17.0 KB ID:	131014



    I'm trying to increase specific skill areas that are lacking with each new project, and it's no secret that I can't file a straight line worth a damn. Some people make it look easy, but in the past I've gotten all panicky and heavy handed about it. That said, the first thing I decided to do was to try and cut out the area for the aft navigation light on the sail. Of course, it went horribly awry. Taking inspiration from you bums, I remember reading something about it being easier to scribe detail into a softer medium than GRP or Styrene. Something like cured Evercoat metal glaze. I figured that filing probably worked the same way, so I gooped some into the gaping hole I made, sanded it to the profile of the sail, then cut and filed a new opening.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_1953.jpg Views:	1 Size:	21.4 KB ID:	131015

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_1954.jpg Views:	1 Size:	21.9 KB ID:	131016



    Relatively pleased with how that turned out, I then moved on to the sail planes. In the cabal report, it's mentioned that while you can make the sail planes functional on this boat, it's not absolutely necessary. For whatever reason, I decided to go with that and permanently mount them to the sail. I ended up getting two port side copies of the plane, and when you look closely, they have something of a glove that smooths out the transition from sail to plane. Since these aren't going to be functional, I cut the glove off of each piece, flipped one over, and voila!
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2003.jpg Views:	1 Size:	29.1 KB ID:	131017


    I will come back to these with some Evercoat and properly blend them into the sail with a nice scribed line so they look as they should.


    While playing around with the sail, I decided to open up a few holes on top for masts and periscopes.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2009.jpg Views:	1 Size:	27.3 KB ID:	131018



    I took a deep breath, steadied my trembling hands, and slowly... gently, began to file.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2011.JPG Views:	1 Size:	32.4 KB ID:	131019



    I smoothed-up the masts and installed the resin plug that they mount into. Initial test fitting showed promising results
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2012.jpg Views:	1 Size:	44.3 KB ID:	131020


    Now, someone can correct me if I'm wrong here, but I'm about 90% sure that the specific mast that is in the aft spot should actually go in front of the flat-top one. However, I only got three from David, and I realized this after the fact. I may try to modify it to represent the proper mast. Maybe I'll file out the penetration in front and scratchbuild something to go in its place. Maybe I'll run for president and win in a landslide upset that no one saw coming. Who knows! But, I'm also a believer in sometimes not pushing one's luck.


    While up on deck I got to thinking about ventilation. There were a lot of little pockets on CARTER where air bubbles would get trapped, and my method on that boat was to drill a 1/8" hole into the hull, and then cap it with a #2 metric flat washer. A bit of creative license, if you will, but it gets the job done and doesn't look that awful. I gave U-36 the same treatment, only I placed two quads of vents where the deck cleats would go. Again, I'm pretty happy with how it turned out, and with some paint and finish on it, I think they'll look just fine.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2026.jpg Views:	1 Size:	26.4 KB ID:	131021



    At this point, the weekend was beginning to draw to a close, but I thought I'd take a crack at the prop before calling it a day. As you can see, there was some flash to remove from the propellers
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2004.jpg Views:	1 Size:	25.9 KB ID:	131022



    So, once more, absolutely terrified (but feeling a little emboldened by how things went on the sail) I carefully began to shape and file until
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2006.jpg Views:	1 Size:	25.0 KB ID:	131023

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2005.jpg Views:	1 Size:	23.4 KB ID:	131024



    In David's report, he mentions pickling the in the white propeller with Ferric Chloride before priming and painting it. Well I didn't have any, but I was researching FC and ran across a number of examples of people making an etchant out of a 1.25 : 1.00 mixture of Vinegar and Hydrogen Peroxide with some salt mixed in. I mixed the ingredients, then added some baking soda and finally rinsed it off with 9+ PH water. Did it do anything? I haven't the slightest idea... but it was fun playing with chemistry, and I didn't ruin the prop. So there's that.

    U-35 and U-36 both use the 7-blade skewback propeller as opposed to their four older sisters. Interestingly enough, U-35 and 36 seem to have been the victim of some unfortunate engineering squawks. To boot, U-35 was involved in an underwater collision that required her to be towed back to port for repairs to her rudder. Doing a bit of digging, it would appear that despite some meritorious action on the part of her crew, the WWII-era U-35 was also known as the bad luck boat of the 2nd U-Boot Flotilla after being involved in several accidents and collisions. Maybe there's a good reason why sailors are superstitious..... Not wanting to follow suit, but still wanting to use the pretty looking propeller, I opted to depict U-36. A few coats of primer and paint later, and
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2031.jpg Views:	1 Size:	18.1 KB ID:	131025


    I'll take that. Now, the really cool thing about both U-35 and 36 is that they use what ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems refer to as the Propeller Boss Vortex Diffuser in place of the solid, conical shaped cap used on the earlier Type 212's.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	image_39216.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	140.6 KB
ID:	131026

    ....versus
    Click image for larger version  Name:	roblin_sub_1.jpg Views:	1 Size:	559.1 KB ID:	131028


    Well, I happen to have some bits of Renshape (also courtesy of Mr. Merriman) and I think that just looks too cool to not try and depict. Also, there's the question of scale accuracy. This part of the project, while small, will be completely uncharted territory for me. I have never worked with Renshape before, I have no idea how to create those spiral vanes on the body of the diffuser or the end-plate, and I suppose if we're carving in Renshape, we might as well cast the damn thing in resin as well. Another first for me.


    SO! Here we are. It's Monday, and if you're still reading this novel at this point, I thank you for following along. There are still some miles to go, but I think U-36 is off to a good start. Most importantly, I'm having fun and learning new things along the way. Comments, critiques, and suggestions are always welcome. Until then, stay tuned.

    Prost!


    -Brady
    Last edited by DMTNT; 03-11-2019, 08:11 PM.

  • #2
    Great job Mate. I'm sure that this one is going to be better than Carter - and was a great thing as well. The 212 is one of my favorite boats and that kit, with David's bits is a master piece.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by HardRock View Post
      Great job Mate. I'm sure that this one is going to be better than Carter - and was a great thing as well. The 212 is one of my favorite boats and that kit, with David's bits is a master piece.
      Thanks Scott! We will see how it goes. I am already thinking about what comes next when the time is right. Maybe something Russian? 1/96, of course.

      Any suggestions? ;-)

      Comment


      • #4
        Ha, ha. Cue the famous Brady **** eating grin!

        Comment


        • #5
          Good work so far, Brady.

          That diffuser would be a lathe project. Work with the machine you got, or make your own small lathe like this one:

          Start with one of those cheapy 120-volt AC electric drills you'll find at a box store like Harbor Freight and remove the handle section and strap the thing to a bed, in this case some of that stout 3/4" chipped wood shelving. Note that the tool rest is made from pieces of angle-iron that have had slots milled into the pieces to permit height and lateral positioning



          Remove the drills switch and hard-wire the motor to an AC speed controller like this Dremel unit -- you want variable seed on this type machine. A foot switch is useful too.






          Take a hunk of that RenShape, mount it on a spindle the same diameter as your propeller shaft (1/8" I believe), mount the spindle in the chuck of the lathe, and turn to the body shape of the diffuser.



          The neat part is attaching all those vanes to the diffuser body, equally spaced and of uniform pitch. For that you will use the tool rest as a bed during vane attachment, and an indexing disc to guide you as to location of each vane as you glue each to the body.









          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Taking copious notes. Thank you David!

            What are your thoughts on getting the swirl geometry of the vanes? Would it basically be the same method as you described above?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DMTNT View Post
              Taking copious notes. Thank you David!

              What are your thoughts on getting the swirl geometry of the vanes? Would it basically be the same method as you described above?
              Yes.

              You take a long strip of .005" thick styrene and curl it (drawing it between thumb and X-Acto blade handle), snipe it into little shards, make a holding fixture and mount that atop the tool-rest, and rotate the chuck holding the diffuser body the appropriate amount (dictated by the indexing disc) as you glue each vane in place.





              David
              The Magnificent
              "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

              Comment


              • #8
                Anyone know what the score is with those rear vanes, looks like they're skewed a bit at the base- is that to reduce/counter torque roll from the prop?
                DIVE IN! Go on, go on, go on, go on, GO ON! http://www.diveintomodelsubmarines.co.uk

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Subculture View Post
                  Anyone know what the score is with those rear vanes, looks like they're skewed a bit at the base- is that to reduce/counter torque roll from the prop?
                  Not much moment to the vanes, so close to the center of rotation. So, their torque is marginal. If they work like other attenuators, they straighten out the helical flow induced by the rotating propeller (A pump-jet stator(s) does that and also recovers some of the thrust otherwise lost to the none-axial flow of the accelerated water). Wake reduction (the job of the attenuator) reduces the sonar and pressure signature of the wake, making life harder for wake-homing torpedoes. ****ing Russian's -- they love those things -- A great seeker against big wake carrier task groups and the occasional submarine.
                  "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Subculture View Post
                    Anyone know what the score is with those rear vanes, looks like they're skewed a bit at the base- is that to reduce/counter torque roll from the prop?
                    Not much is known about the system, but it's based on similar principals as finned systems commercial ships use to increase efficiency.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I was told that on the Walrus there is an exhaust that is dispersed out the prop hub when running on batteries. Maybe this would be the same as well as increase efficiency. Just having that vortex may mix the expended gases so they are less traceable or diffuse the gases into the sea.
                      If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        David, can you elaborate a little bit more on making a spindle to chuck into that lathe? It looks like you are able to operate it without having a stationary tail piece to oppose the spinn-y end.
                        Last edited by DMTNT; 03-13-2019, 11:18 AM. Reason: I no words good on my Eye Fone

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DMTNT View Post
                          David, can you elaborate a little bit more on making a spindle to chuck into that lathe? It looks like you are able to operate it without having a stationary tail piece to oppose the spinn-y end.
                          For most of the small turnings we produce a single-point support is fine for whatever type lathe we employ, be it a traditional wood or metal lathe, moto-tool, drill-press, drill-motor. The trick is to employ a head-stock that works as a collet, chuck, or face-plate.













                          Longer turned items require some support at the other end, this task handled by a tail-stock of some sort.










                          David
                          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                          Comment


                          • #14






                            David
                            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great stuff, David. Thank you.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X