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All Moving Control Surface vs Regular Stabilizer with Separate Dive Planes

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  • All Moving Control Surface vs Regular Stabilizer with Separate Dive Planes

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    any advantages one over the other?
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    Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

  • #2
    Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
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    any advantages one over the other?
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    Don't. It's not scale and is over-kill.

    David
    Resident Luddite

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    • #3
      https://youtu.be/0ccKPSVQcFk
      Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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      • #4
        Contrary to what one might think would be logical, you can have too much control surface. If you went the full flying dive plane route, you'd have to restrict the throw to compensate...

        Bob

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        • #5
          Is it correct to assume that all flying control surfaces are best suited for slow moving boats ( WWII boats) while flaps are for high speed boats ( modern nukes/ diesel electrics/ AIP systems)?
          Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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          • #6
            Nope... not necessarily. if you take a look at something like the German 212, they have full flying x-rudders, and they're quick boats (though admittedly more suited to coastal settings than open ocean as far as I know). The stabilizers that support the partial rudders also serve as protection for those control surfaces. A lot of boats that need to punch through the ice will have the stabilizing structures to protect the rudder from damage during surfacing through ice.

            Many times you'll see full flying rudders and "flap-style" rear dive planes (IE: Skipjack).

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