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Building my first 3D printed sub - WTC sizing question

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  • Building my first 3D printed sub - WTC sizing question

    Hello all, I am currently working on my own 3D designed/printed sub and I have a question about how large/long the WTC should be.

    To start, the sub is modeled after the Virginia Class submarine; at the current scale that I'm modeling the sub at, it'll come out to be 1.46 m (4 feet 9 in) long with a general outer hull diameter of 130 mm (5 in) (and an inner hull diameter of 128 mm (4.8 in)). The general design of the body is almost done and I'm trying to design in as many of the internal features as possible, including the bulkheads and WTC cradles. (I've included a couple photos of the sub in soldiworks for visualization.)

    I would like the try my hand at making my own WTC, however this will be my first personally built WTC and I'm not sure about the sizing. For note, I'm not currently planning anything too special for this sub, for now the goal is to just have working control surfaces and basic ballast control. With all this in mind, is there a general rule of thumb to follow when it comes to sizing WTC's to models?

    Thanks for the time and consideration, as well as any advice you may have to offer :D

  • #2
    Originally posted by frozenottsel View Post
    Hello all, I am currently working on my own 3D designed/printed sub and I have a question about how large/long the WTC should be.

    To start, the sub is modeled after the Virginia Class submarine; at the current scale that I'm modeling the sub at, it'll come out to be 1.46 m (4 feet 9 in) long with a general outer hull diameter of 130 mm (5 in) (and an inner hull diameter of 128 mm (4.8 in)). The general design of the body is almost done and I'm trying to design in as many of the internal features as possible, including the bulkheads and WTC cradles. (I've included a couple photos of the sub in soldiworks for visualization.)

    I would like the try my hand at making my own WTC, however this will be my first personally built WTC and I'm not sure about the sizing. For note, I'm not currently planning anything too special for this sub, for now the goal is to just have working control surfaces and basic ballast control. With all this in mind, is there a general rule of thumb to follow when it comes to sizing WTC's to models?

    Thanks for the time and consideration, as well as any advice you may have to offer :D
    The only size critical item is the ballast tank. Specifically, its floodable volume.

    Use your handy-dandy, kick-ass, wonder CAD software to give you the total above waterline displacement of the eventual devil-spawned 3D printed model. That's the volume of water you want the ballast tank to hold -- add 10% for ****s and giggles.

    Everything else about the WTC geometry is incidental to the gear you want to cram into it.

    David
    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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    • #3
      Floodable volume and total above waterline displacement; I'll keep that in mind going forward, thanks for the advice :D

      Comment


      • #4
        Any time, pal.

        David
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

        Comment


        • #5
          Okay, so I've got some hardware and parts coming in the mail soon (along with a couple new spools of filament to start printing) and I'm now looking at electronics in the meanwhile. My main concern right now is setting up my failsafe for the system.

          As far as I can tell the Nautilus BLM seems to be exactly what I'm looking for. I've watched a few of Bob Martin's videos of WTC setup and wiring and it appears that his builds tend to use the BLM to actuate a gas valve to blow out the ballast tanks during emergencies (be it low battery or signal loss). However, in the case with my sub, the ballast will be a piston system on a peristaltic pump, so I won't be able to empty it by blowing water from tanks. Does anyone know if I would be able to set a BLM to run the pump to empty the piston?

          Maybe I could run a y connection into the pump's speed controller with one line coming from the receiver and the other coming from the BLM?

          Comment


          • #6
            No. Lead from receiver to BLM, lead from BLM to peristaltic pump ESC. That simple.

            The BLM passes on signals from the receiver as long as the pulse-train is evident. When the pulse-train is lost the BLM steps in, blocks the receiver, generates the correct pulse duration to drive the pumps ESC in the direction needed to push water out of the syringe.

            David
            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Ahh, okay. That's perfect then :D

              Comment


              • #8
                Yep, yep! The BLM isn't a gas-blow failsafe, it's just a trigger. Loss of signal or low battery trigger it to output a signal, which you could hook up to almost anything from a light to a horn to a valve to a motor relay!

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