Russian Arcturus Concept Submarine Build

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  • rwtdiver
    Vice Admiral
    • Feb 2019
    • 1823

    #16
    Making some more progress on the hull sections!

    Click image for larger version

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    3 more sections to go!!

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat"

    Comment

    • RCSubGuy
      Welcome to my underwater realm!
      • Aug 2009
      • 1800

      #17
      Alrighty. We got this licked (provided the props actually push the boat with decent thrust).

      First off, let's talk linkages. The Arcturus, as I engineered these files, has a modified x-tail configuration. The control surfaces are not aligned, and the horns for each all need to point towards the centerline of the boat thanks to the limited room back there, meaning that some creative engineering needs to take place. Typically, the planes that are across from one another are in line, meaning you can connect them with standard yokes and run a single rod to the horn. Not gonna work in this case as the rotation needs to be reversed thanks to the placement of the horns. All control horns need to point toward the centerline of the boat. If you can figure out a way to get one pointing in and another out, you will be able to simplify the linkages and do away with the assembly I'm about to show you.

      First off, here is the configuration with a highly technical and ultra-precise rendering of the setup:
      Click image for larger version

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      And here is the photo of the linkage assembly needed to convert the linear force in the applicable directions to each control surface:
      Click image for larger version

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ID:	166580Click image for larger version

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      In this setup, control surfaces 1 and 4 need to work in tandem, and 2 and 3 need to work in tandem. 1 is connected to the forward assembly under the shaft, 4 is connected to the same shaft, but above it. Move the shaft in one direction, and rudders 1 and 4 move in the same direction. Without the assembly up front, they'd move in opposite directions. Same goes for 2 and 3.

      Okay, now onto propulsion. The stern is tight, especially with all the linkages coming forward from that area. That makes making room for tubing for pump propulsion very problematic. A simple 1/8" drive shaft slips in there nicely, however. All we needed to do was engineer a prop back there to push the boat.

      Here is the solution I came up with:
      Click image for larger version

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Views:	176
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ID:	166586Click image for larger version

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Views:	180
Size:	89.6 KB
ID:	166581

      Parts needed: 20mm diameter brass props, 1/8" stainless shafts, 1/8" universal joints, 3D printed mounting bulkhead, 5/32" brass tube (for the thrust/reverse thrust bushing). It may be that we need to block the opening beside the prop shroud to stop water cycling around it, but we can test that first to see if it's needed. If we do, we might just get away with some plumbers epoxy pressed into the opening to make a nice, smooth filled pocket there. Heck, you could even sculpt in some cool venty-looking thingies, too.

      The 3D printed inserts were done on my resin printer. I tried on my filament printer, but the fitment was poor. I find that filament printers (at least mine) make parts that are about 0.2mm larger than the file dictates. This necessitates a lot of sanding for perfect fit, and these parts are pretty thin. I just used the resin printer and it fits perfectly as you see it here.

      This boat will be the test bed for our upcoming 250 Series SubDriver, which I hope to have parts for within a week. Once we have the prototype cylinder assembled, we'll drop it in this boat and see what it does in the water!


      Bob
      Attached Files

      Comment

      • rwtdiver
        Vice Admiral
        • Feb 2019
        • 1823

        #18
        Originally posted by RCSubGuy
        Alrighty. We got this licked (provided the props actually push the boat with decent thrust).

        First off, let's talk linkages. The Arcturus, as I engineered these files, has a modified x-tail configuration. The control surfaces are not aligned, and the horns for each all need to point towards the centerline of the boat thanks to the limited room back there, meaning that some creative engineering needs to take place. Typically, the planes that are across from one another are in line, meaning you can connect them with standard yokes and run a single rod to the horn. Not gonna work in this case as the rotation needs to be reversed thanks to the placement of the horns. All control horns need to point toward the centerline of the boat. If you can figure out a way to get one pointing in and another out, you will be able to simplify the linkages and do away with the assembly I'm about to show you.

        First off, here is the configuration with a highly technical and ultra-precise rendering of the setup:
        Click image for larger version

Name:	20221108_071643.jpg
Views:	194
Size:	42.4 KB
ID:	166582
        And here is the photo of the linkage assembly needed to convert the linear force in the applicable directions to each control surface:
        Click image for larger version

Name:	20221108_071320.jpg
Views:	220
Size:	112.0 KB
ID:	166580Click image for larger version

Name:	20221108_071318.jpg
Views:	180
Size:	99.7 KB
ID:	166584

        In this setup, control surfaces 1 and 4 need to work in tandem, and 2 and 3 need to work in tandem. 1 is connected to the forward assembly under the shaft, 4 is connected to the same shaft, but above it. Move the shaft in one direction, and rudders 1 and 4 move in the same direction. Without the assembly up front, they'd move in opposite directions. Same goes for 2 and 3.

        Okay, now onto propulsion. The stern is tight, especially with all the linkages coming forward from that area. That makes making room for tubing for pump propulsion very problematic. A simple 1/8" drive shaft slips in there nicely, however. All we needed to do was engineer a prop back there to push the boat.

        Here is the solution I came up with:
        Click image for larger version

Name:	20221107_135642.jpg
Views:	176
Size:	91.6 KB
ID:	166586Click image for larger version

Name:	20221107_135933.jpg
Views:	180
Size:	89.6 KB
ID:	166581

        Parts needed: 20mm diameter brass props, 1/8" stainless shafts, 1/8" universal joints, 3D printed mounting bulkhead, 5/32" brass tube (for the thrust/reverse thrust bushing). It may be that we need to block the opening beside the prop shroud to stop water cycling around it, but we can test that first to see if it's needed. If we do, we might just get away with some plumbers epoxy pressed into the opening to make a nice, smooth filled pocket there. Heck, you could even sculpt in some cool venty-looking thingies, too.

        The 3D printed inserts were done on my resin printer. I tried on my filament printer, but the fitment was poor. I find that filament printers (at least mine) make parts that are about 0.2mm larger than the file dictates. This necessitates a lot of sanding for perfect fit, and these parts are pretty thin. I just used the resin printer and it fits perfectly as you see it here.

        This boat will be the test bed for our upcoming 250 Series SubDriver, which I hope to have parts for within a week. Once we have the prototype cylinder assembled, we'll drop it in this boat and see what it does in the water!


        Bob

        Well Bob,

        Nice job on the engineering! Somewhat complicated, but certainly doable. Thank you very much for taking the time to post up your designs. The function of a V tail configuration is still BIT HAZY in my mind, but ounce I have put it all together I am sure it will make sense!

        Great job Bob, thanks again!

        Rob
        "Firemen can stand the heat"

        Comment

        • RCSubGuy
          Welcome to my underwater realm!
          • Aug 2009
          • 1800

          #19
          Originally posted by rwtdiver


          The function of a V tail configuration is still BIT HAZY in my mind, but ounce I have put it all together I am sure it will make sense!
          Rob,


          X tails are more complicated to engineer, but offer 1.4x the effectiveness of standard cruciform planes/rudders. In the video link below, I go over how they work. It starts at 19:53 in the video:


          Comment

          • rwtdiver
            Vice Admiral
            • Feb 2019
            • 1823

            #20
            Originally posted by RCSubGuy

            Rob,


            X tails are more complicated to engineer, but offer 1.4x the effectiveness of standard cruciform planes/rudders. In the video link below, I go over how they work. It starts at 19:53 in the video:

            Thanks for the video, Bob!

            That does help in explaining how to design the linkages and also how it functions. Very unique design for sure!

            Rob
            "Firemen can stand the heat"

            Comment

            • redboat219
              Admiral
              • Dec 2008
              • 2881

              #21
              Bob,
              What ever happened to this build?
              Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

              Comment

              • rwtdiver
                Vice Admiral
                • Feb 2019
                • 1823

                #22
                Originally posted by redboat219
                Bob,
                What ever happened to this build?
                Just lost interest in building! Moving on!

                Rob
                "Firemen can stand the heat"

                Comment

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