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Nautilus Drydocks - Yesterday's work

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  • The Akula comes in two flavors:
    • Untouched 1/96 Akula, includes all the fittings and detail parts, photo etch, but no dry transfers or plan set .
    • Brass propeller and periscopes
    • 3.5 WTC older, but clean, lightly used if at all, 3 servos installed, and ballast servo.
    • VEX 6 channel TX Brand new (no box)
    • 6 channel RX brand new
    • AD2 brand new
    • Viper ESC brand new
    • Missing pulse detector
    • Asking $899
    Second one is Hull and appendages only: $450


    Progress on Ed's Type VII. The cylinder is 90% complete and the hull and linkages have been modified to accept it. I re-used Mike's slick hold-down system for the cylinder. I installed new guide bushings for the drive shafts as the old ones were running loose in the hull with a bit of slop (not a real issue, but it was bugging me!).

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    Delphin prototype is coming along slowly as we get time. Getting those big contra rotating motors in the back is a challenge, but we'll do it!

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    • Thanks Bob!
      If you're part of the particulate, then you're not part of the solution"

      Comment


      • Thanks for the akula update.

        Comment


        • Bob,

          Nice work on Ed’s VII boat. Looks like the 3” MSD was a great choice and a good fit. Impressed you got the everything fit inside the rear motor module in such a short space with what looks to be the larger air pump. If you don’t mind, post some more photos and details of the work you did setting up this 3” unit.

          Best Regards,

          Nick

          Comment


          • Okay... finally some more updates.

            We're at the point where we can begin to offer our 48th scale XXI kits. They feature hand-laid epoxy GRP hulls and our own reinforced lip enhancement for rigidity and strength. Cast resin appendages. Brass props, stainless drive shafts, and Oto's amazing brass photoetched detail parts and blueprints. I'll have the product up this weekend on the site.

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            Excellent progress on our new 1/48 scale torpedo system. The prototype was tested in my pool a couple of days ago with great results. We'll be adding a bit of weight to get the buoyancy close to neutral when fully loaded, but for the most part, they're working really well. Torpedo launcher is designed and prototype is nearly ready as well. The first recipient will be Ed's Type VII, pictured here. A short video showing the testing results: https://youtu.be/UzXw4_hhrR4

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            T-Class submarine has had a quick paint job, some additional features and a full trim. Now ready for maiden voyage!

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            • I recommend you add weight to the ass end of the weapon to keep the fins out of the air (the 'paddelwheel' effect is causing that skew to the right). And reduce the nozzle bore to .007-.009" to slow the thing down. Almost there!

              I've only recently come to realize -- thanks to Manfred's good works altering my launcher mechanism -- That the too high velocity at launch is owing to the tube not being vented enough to dump the high-pressure bubble of gas liberated once the weapons nozzle clears the breech block O-ring. Turn the tube into Swiss cheese and the weapon will hit the water at a more reasonable velocity.

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              David

              "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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              • Great Bob! Thank you for this effort!!
                If you're part of the particulate, then you're not part of the solution"

                Comment


                • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
                  I recommend you add weight to the ass end of the weapon to keep the fins out of the air (the 'paddelwheel' effect is causing that skew to the right). And reduce the nozzle bore to .007-.009" to slow the thing down. Almost there!

                  David
                  Dave,

                  So the orifice for gas should be .007-.009"? Would appreciate the lowdown on manufacture of the exhaust tube. I see you're hand drilling? Solid brass stock, or fill a tube with something easier to bore through?
                  Looks like she's plugged with solder in the photo to achieve this. 1/16, 3/32 OD tube?

                  Also, will the friction of the O-ring over the exhaust tube hold her? Multiple 0-rings?

                  In experimenting between gas and electric, I'm back to gas, I definitaly think it's the more simple and reliable of the two. At least for me.

                  BTW, I always love seeing your "Manifold of DEATH".

                  Ed
                  v/r "Sub" Ed

                  Silent Service "Cold War" Veteran (The good years!)
                  NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.
                  USS ULYSSES S GRANT-USS SHARK-USS NAUTILUS-USS KEY WEST-USS BLUEBACK-USS PATRICK HENRY-K432-U25-SSRN SEAVIEW-PROTEUS-NAUTILUS

                  Comment



                  • I've only recently come to realize -- thanks to Manfred's good works altering my launcher mechanism -- That the too high velocity at launch is owing to the tube not being vented enough to dump the high-pressure bubble of gas liberated once the weapons nozzle clears the breech block O-ring. Turn the tube into Swiss cheese and the weapon will hit the water at a more reasonable velocity.

                    David,

                    You've been sneaking inside the 212, that boat has the modified launchers, i've made multiple large slits into the launchtubes to get rid of the gas as soon as possible.
                    Altered the loadingnipples to accept butane lightergas, butane has less energy as the Paasch gas you guys use, if i remind well i've got me a range of 15 feet.

                    Bob,

                    Can't wait to see how your launchers will work out, me like mechanical stuff.

                    Manfred.


                    Fertig zum unterwasser.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by MFR1964 View Post
                      I've only recently come to realize -- thanks to Manfred's good works altering my launcher mechanism -- That the too high velocity at launch is owing to the tube not being vented enough to dump the high-pressure bubble of gas liberated once the weapons nozzle clears the breech block O-ring. Turn the tube into Swiss cheese and the weapon will hit the water at a more reasonable velocity.

                      David,

                      You've been sneaking inside the 212, that boat has the modified launchers, i've made multiple large slits into the launchtubes to get rid of the gas as soon as possible.
                      Altered the loadingnipples to accept butane lightergas, butane has less energy as the Paasch gas you guys use, if i remind well i've got me a range of 15 feet.

                      Bob,

                      Can't wait to see how your launchers will work out, me like mechanical stuff.

                      Manfred.

                      With the simple modification to the tube (opening it up to burp out the gas over-pressure at launch) you solved my last big problem with the system, too high a discharge speed imparted to the weapon, leading to instability. You, as always, lead the way my friend.

                      I've just received the Butane lighter valves from a UK supplier along with a tap to thread a charging valve to accept them -- I'm going to try the 'European way' of charging these weapons. See: Your comment about the higher pressure we in the States use was not wasted on me, pal.

                      David
                      Last edited by He Who Shall Not Be Named; 12-05-2020, 05:39 PM.
                      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                      Comment


                      • Any chance we can see some pictures of that New Valve?

                        Thanks

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                          If it is the valves I’m thinking of, they are Ronson butane fill valves. The model live steam locomotives and steam boats guys use them for refillable butane/propane tanks for firing the boilers. I also used these in house for the refillable fuel tanks we manufactured for the steam plant systems we made.

                          Google or search EBay for “Ronson butane Fill valve”


                          Nick
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by george View Post
                            Any chance we can see some pictures of that New Valve?

                            Thanks
                            Sure. It's called a 'Butane lighter fuel filling valve'... or some such Euro-babble term. Anyway, the dam thing has a ****ing metric thread -- I'm awaiting an ordered tap to match this thread so I can make a proper torpedo charging fitting. It will be an equivalent to the standard tire-valve I've been using since day-one, you see two of them in background.

                            We'll see if the lower energy Butane will slow the weapons down over what I'm getting now with the Methane-Butane 'propellant'.

                            Manfred and Ron Perrott put me onto the Butane idea. I blame them!

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                            David
                            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by QuarterMaster View Post

                              Dave,

                              So the orifice for gas should be .007-.009"? Would appreciate the lowdown on manufacture of the exhaust tube. I see you're hand drilling? Solid brass stock, or fill a tube with something easier to bore through?
                              Looks like she's plugged with solder in the photo to achieve this. 1/16, 3/32 OD tube?

                              Also, will the friction of the O-ring over the exhaust tube hold her? Multiple 0-rings?

                              In experimenting between gas and electric, I'm back to gas, I definitaly think it's the more simple and reliable of the two. At least for me.

                              BTW, I always love seeing your "Manifold of DEATH".

                              Ed
                              Hey, you bum!

                              I use either a 1/16" o.d. length of brass tube or one of aluminum. I'll solder a short plug into the nozzle end of the brass, or glue in a short length of resin rod if the tube (stand-pipe is a more appropriate term in this application) is aluminum. In either case I first chamfer a divergent nozzle at the ass-end and follow that up with a small drill bit to bore out the throat of the nozzle. For a 1/72 sized weapon I'm happy with a .007" nozzle bore.

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                              No, the gas sealing O-ring at the breech end is not enough to hold the weapon reliably in place. That's why the weapon makes use of a ball type 'stop-bolt' at the front end of the weapon to keep it securely in the launch till things cycle from battery to launch. I learned that lesson the hard way.

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                              Yeah. That monstrosity was built shortly after I Converted and accepted Rube Goldberg as my personal Savior.

                              What the **** was I thinking???!!!!!......

                              David
                              "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

                                No, the gas sealing O-ring at the breech end is not enough to hold the weapon reliably in place. That's why the weapon makes use of a ball type 'stop-bolt' at the front end of the weapon to keep it securely in the launch till things cycle from battery to launch. I learned that lesson the hard way.
                                Ah Cr@* !!!

                                Still haven’t gotten around to testing the new gas weapons in the dual purpose 1/48 scale launcher I’ve been working on but I have made the parts for both the launcher and the weapons. Been trying to get some time this weekend to mess with it. Was hoping (wishing) the friction of the o-ring seal on the gas weapon’s stand pipe would be enough to keep it in place from battery until launch. I’m guessing you used a -003 o-ring as well? If so, do you recall what you designed the o-ring groove for? Was it a static or dynamic clearance?

                                I designed for a dynamic clearance considering the movement. This gives about a 10% compression seal of the o-ring around the stand pipe. While the static groove design would ideally give a 20% compression seal. Maybe split the difference to a 15% compression seal?

                                Okay now I need to know.... How bad was it? Spill the beans!! What happened.... who almost lost an eye? We won’t judge (well, too harshly)

                                Thinking out loud, wonder if the lower pressure butane would still make this an issue? I know from past years experience developing burners for boilers ambient temperature has a huge effect on butane gas pressure thus burner performance.

                                The cleverly added ball stop you designed into your launchers is a great safety feature regardless. The muzzle doors on the dual weapon capable launch system I’ve been working on would slow down and contain a unintentional launch in the tube but it won’t stop it from happening at all like your ball stop in its current design.

                                Nick
                                Last edited by Monahan Steam Models; 12-05-2020, 11:31 PM.

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