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3D Printing Submariens and Sub Components

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  • I use 3D printing a lot. maybe I have found that I rarely can handcraft something that is symmetrical or straight. Using 3D printing also allows me to get more done. I can have something printing while I do other things (like spend time with the family). That being said, 3D printing allows me to create things that would not be normally done. As an example on my Skipjack the water intake to the piston was created to go around items in the WTC. fabricating that by hand (for me) would put me in a padded room.
    Click image for larger version

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    This WTC is 3D printed (minus seals, o-rings, electronics, screws...you get what I mean).
    3D printing is here to stay and is bringing more people into our hobby. I cannot tell you how many times I have been contacted, but it is bringing some of those that never would have gotten into this hobby. It is also bringing people to use traditional construction techniques and teaching the hand skills those that object to 3D printing complain about (you know who you are). It is bringing in skills the back way.
    Bart, used 3D printing for his scribing mask, brilliant use. I am going to purchase the Typhoon file (it is the perfect size in 1/144 scale - thank you Bob). In time the technology will get better and offer more opportunities. I am excited to see what people continue to do with this "new" tool.
    Peace,
    Tom
    If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

    Comment


    • We have become enslaved to electron flow.

      Take todays young 'Machinist' or engineer. How will they cope one second after?
      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

      Comment


      • Originally posted by trout View Post
        I use 3D printing a lot. maybe I have found that I rarely can handcraft something that is symmetrical or straight. Using 3D printing also allows me to get more done. I can have something printing while I do other things (like spend time with the family). That being said, 3D printing allows me to create things that would not be normally done. As an example on my Skipjack the water intake to the piston was created to go around items in the WTC. fabricating that by hand (for me) would put me in a padded room.
        Click image for larger version

Name:	Piston_WTC.jpg
Views:	52
Size:	88.8 KB
ID:	143488
        This WTC is 3D printed (minus seals, o-rings, electronics, screws...you get what I mean).
        3D printing is here to stay and is bringing more people into our hobby. I cannot tell you how many times I have been contacted, but it is bringing some of those that never would have gotten into this hobby. It is also bringing people to use traditional construction techniques and teaching the hand skills those that object to 3D printing complain about (you know who you are). It is bringing in skills the back way.
        Bart, used 3D printing for his scribing mask, brilliant use. I am going to purchase the Typhoon file (it is the perfect size in 1/144 scale - thank you Bob). In time the technology will get better and offer more opportunities. I am excited to see what people continue to do with this "new" tool.
        Peace,
        Tom
        Hi Tom,

        I am 3D Printing all the way!

        Click image for larger version

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ID:	143493Click image for larger version

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        Rob

        "Firemen can stand the heat"

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        • Originally posted by trout View Post
          Bart, used 3D printing for his scribing mask, brilliant use.
          Please be aware that although the idea was indeed brilliant...........the end result was horrible imo.....could not make it work.......not a straight or plum line on the sub.......thought I could rectify it.........no such thing......did the whole upper hull.......Will start filling up all the scribing lines today and start making my usual brass stencils.

          What it was good for was to use it as a drilling stencil for all the holes in the deck. Lessons learned.

          Grtz,
          Bart








          Practical wisdom is only to be learned in the school of experience.
          "Samuel Smiles"
          http://scale-submarine.com/index.html

          Comment


          • Bart,

            All my joking and cheap-shots aside, what you are doing -- specifically your identification of methodologies that result in failure -- is so instructive. The Craft is an exploration of what works and does not work. Without a clear presentation of what does not work we are left to repeat your wrong turns.

            It's a sign of good character when the teacher identifies and explains the shortcomings of a process that does not produce the desired results. It clears the path for us students; it makes the trek an easier one for us all.

            Good on ya, my friend.

            David

            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

            Comment


            • Bart, i really appreciate your honesty on what worked or didn’t work. We all learn both ways. Thank you.
              If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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