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Maintenance on my TypeVII

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  • #31
    Driving the Bibers is fun, they are dynamic divers, no backbreaking efforts to get them in the water, each time i drive them people are amazed they work so well.



    Controlling both Bibers happens with two equal receivers but using different channels, so that one you guessed right, that transmittor i have has two modes, PCM, which is used for the type VII, and PPM for controlling the Bibers.
    It is a computer bases transmittor, pretty much a fore runner of the Wyfly we now use, it's possible to control every channel, i've got a bible-size manual with leads the way.


    Both the hulls from the type VII came from a belgium club, they wanted a flottilla of type VII's, it never materialised, some where build, as i recall right, only two or three where build as functional model.
    I got mine as part of a buy from a guy who stopped building those boats, my mentor type VII was laid down himself from the mold, the mold itself was CNC created and spliited in two, unfortunally it is missing, either placed on a dusty attic or ended up at a landfill.

    Thanks for the complements, i gathered my skills from my mentor and trying each time, even when you fail, which offcourse is also a learningprocess to become better.

    Manfred.

    I went underground

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    • #32
      A shame the molds are gone, Manfred. Brings up one question, do you know if the master was built from scratch or eyeballed*twinkle* from a Schaffer U-995?

      After some research and building an entire tech rack around the big 750' i decided to use the 550' instead. More versatile i have more parts for them etc. Plus the torque of the bigger engines would tear the shafts/couplings apart, i am afraid. Engel uses 540' in their Typhoon at 25 kg wet weight so i believe they are scale for an 1/50 Whiskey.

      Have a nice afternoon again thanks for your advice

      Jörg

      Comment


      • #33
        Jorg,

        Not eyeballed, but made after reichswerft drawings, for it's time, we talk 80's, it was a good hull to make a nice type VII.
        Good choice on the 550's, the torque should be enough, as long your Wiskey is not too heavy you've got a good combination, my pleasure to give you some advice.
        There is a guy at belgium who has made some new molds, drawn from a original hull which he has found.

        Manfred.
        Last edited by MFR1964; 01-23-2022, 01:03 PM.
        I went underground

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        • #34
          Manfred,

          Speaking of future Seehund builds, have you seen the 1/35 scale kit put out by Bronco? Not sure how they measure up detail wise to the resin models from Verlinden.

          Nick

          Comment


          • #35
            I'd like to see Manfred tackle the 1/35 British X-craft from I love kit ( Merit). Click image for larger version

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            Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
              I'd like to see Manfred tackle the 1/35 British X-craft from I love kit ( Merit). Click image for larger version

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              Finish your damn kilo already

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              • #37
                Nick,

                Plastick models are only suited as wet models, running them dry is asking for troubles, it's better to make a hull from epoxy.

                Your question about the Verlinden Seehund,

                Click image for larger version

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                This is the resin hull i own, PE parts and other resin parts to make a complete Seehund.

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                This is the one my mentor made, i suspect he made a mold from the Verlinden Seehund, followed pretty much the same way as with the Bibers.

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                Click image for larger version

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                Same layout as with the Bibers, same method of sealing it up.

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                You split the Seehund this way, screw are hidden when put together.

                Click image for larger version

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                If you like really small, builded this Marder scale 1:35 a few years ago, controlling it with a toy-transmittor, it's a suface runner, don't want it to push too far.

                Romel,

                That ain't gonna happen, my plate is full, got other projects to do, it seems that people forget that building micro is as hard as building big, and the result is a bathtub submarine, i'm more a open water guy.


                Manfred.
                I went underground

                Comment


                • #38
                  Manfred,

                  You make an excellent point about plastic hull models versus epoxy hull models for building a dry hull boat. I’m curious as to how your friend made the epoxy Seehund and Biber hulls from the molds. Were they laid up as port and starboard halves and then epoxied together?

                  Nice work on the Marder!

                  Nick

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                  • #39
                    Nick,

                    Traditional build as two halves from the mold, glued/epoxied to make one hull.

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                    This is the mold i still have from the Bibers, he used gipsen to stabilise the mold, probably started it with pusing down the resin model halfway untill the gipsen turned hard, used the same method in the past, disadvantage is, only usable a few times, i used mine one time to get me the hull i wanted, smashed it to retrieve the epoxy hull.
                    Now i build my molds to last, those days, we wanted models which were not availibe didn't matter how.

                    Manfred.
                    I went underground

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Wanted to try this with my Revell Type ViI, but doesn't gypsum undergo an exothermic reaction -gives off heat, that can warp the styrene?
                      Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Manfred,

                        Thank you for taking the time to show the mold and explain the process. Looks like he first made the soft rubber mold like rtv to capture the fine details and the gypsum as a hard support for the rubber. Very similar to using rtv rubber with a hard fiberglass backing. Very clever.

                        Nick
                        Last edited by Monahan Steam Models; 01-26-2022, 09:00 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          This looks like a good technique for making molds for GRP copies of styrene hulls for personnal use. https://youtu.be/tbFzzueUcVs

                          The clay protects the styrene from the heat of the plaster or fiberglass strongback while it cures.
                          Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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