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Best 3D Printing Filament Type?

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  • rwtdiver
    replied
    Originally posted by SubHuman View Post
    Printing without 100% infill will absolutely eventually allow water to enter the interior voids, which changes buoyancy. Water will be trapped there. You'll see a gradual reduction in buoyancy, followed by hours, if not days, of your sub leaking water onto your bench after you run it.

    I know this from past experience. Don't cheap out on time or material. Print solid parts.


    Bob
    I totally agree with Bob! Unless you DIP the complete sub in a poly solution, you will have water penetration. Even at 100% there is still some penetration, and therefore you still need to seal your work up! .As stated don't cheap out because of time. Print at 100%! It certainly makes for a more stable and strong hull as well, especially if you are using PLA!

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat"

    Leave a comment:


  • SubHuman
    replied
    Printing without 100% infill will absolutely eventually allow water to enter the interior voids, which changes buoyancy. Water will be trapped there. You'll see a gradual reduction in buoyancy, followed by hours, if not days, of your sub leaking water onto your bench after you run it.

    I know this from past experience. Don't cheap out on time or material. Print solid parts.


    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • RCJetDude
    replied
    Originally posted by DrScoles View Post
    Hi All, Sub newb here, done a ton of 3D printing both filament and SLA. Why is everyone using 100% infil? Is it air being captured between layers making the sub too buoyant?? Shouldn't be required for strength.

    Thanks
    I do it for that reason and because there is often just enough porosity in a print to allow water into at least some of the air pockets thus trapping it. I printed just the 6 outer most perimeters on my Columbia because I modelled it in solid sections. By doing that there is no porosity created by the back and forth zig-zag of the print head as it is just concentric rings. I do realize not all subjects would lend themselves to being printed that way though.

    Leave a comment:


  • DrScoles
    replied
    Hi All, Sub newb here, done a ton of 3D printing both filament and SLA. Why is everyone using 100% infil? Is it air being captured between layers making the sub too buoyant?? Shouldn't be required for strength.

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • tifosi12
    replied
    I love Hatchbox as a brand and its wood type as my fav PLA. It is more sandable than regular PLA, which helps a lot. Also nicely glues together with CA.

    Leave a comment:


  • RCJetDude
    replied
    I am currently printing a 1/6th Seehund in ASA on an Ender 5+. I love ASA but I know it has its issues that keeps some from using it. My 1/72 Columbia is also printed in ASA.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20210423_113706.jpg Views:	0 Size:	45.3 KB ID:	149256
    Last edited by RCJetDude; 04-23-2021, 08:02 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • biggsgolf
    replied
    This thread has produced valuable information. I can’t help but wonder if 3D printing information is scattered thruought the forums here? Is there a key search word to find this information? If not maybe 3D printing deserves a category of its own?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sinksalot
    replied
    ASA filament hands down is the #1. Its also the #1 pain in the ass to print correctly at first. But once you got good enclosure temp, a good filament, a good Adhesive Glue for the bed, good filament speed, Good everything else, you are set!

    Leave a comment:


  • rwtdiver
    replied
    Originally posted by coryhenry View Post
    I did mine out of Prusament ASA. Never have to worry about heat or degradation.
    No doubt there are better filaments and 3D printers for building submarine hulls! David M. would love me for saying this! I guess I am just old school, and I know my printers are old school! Neither one that I own will work with anything but PLA! The Predator might work with ABS, but not without some upgrades and a spot to work in my garage (sitting at 96 F right now)!

    The other reason I like Solutech WHITE PLA is it gives off very little if any of the fumes that some of these special filaments give off! So that allows me to print inside my office/shop without dealing with the fume factors! PLA needs a little more finessing, but it works great for me!

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat"

    Leave a comment:


  • coryhenry
    replied
    I did mine out of Prusament ASA. Never have to worry about heat or degradation.

    Leave a comment:


  • rwtdiver
    replied
    Nothing special for me! I have 5 3D printed submarines, and 3 more in the works right now! I use Solutech White PLA! With proper printing at 100% infill, and no special treatment! Light sanding, sanding primers inside and out (I use two kinds of primer) flat final color finishes, and matt or flat on the clear coats. I make sure not to keep the subs out in very hot temperatures! During the summer heat (Arizona) my sub runs are about 10 to 15 min. then back in the cool!

    This has worked very well for me. I run all my subs in the swimming pool only!

    Rob
    "Firemen can stand the heat"

    Leave a comment:


  • type7
    replied
    Overture PETG from Amazon and Prusament PETG from Prusa have worked well for me. Handles heat and moisture well.

    Leave a comment:


  • biggsgolf
    started a topic Best 3D Printing Filament Type?

    Best 3D Printing Filament Type?

    Hello, looking for advice on which Filament types are best suited for RC Submarine builds?
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