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Scratch Build Soviet Project 667 BDRM Delta IV SSBN K-18 "Karelia" Scale 1/140

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  • David, that new hull looks really thin and light! Will you use the 661' cylinder and a new balast tank, or are you planning something different this time?

    Regards, Jörg

    Comment


    • Hello all,

      After drilling the hole for the forward screw that fits up underneath it was time to align and glue the two hull halves at the bow. This meant using tape to strap down the top, minus the very rear and the lower hull making sure that they were registering where I needed them to. Once the top and bottom where in the right position I simple needed to tape around the joint line where the two halves meet at the bow. this tape runs about 5mm above and below the joint. It means that I can lay up some light strip of cloth along the outside of the hull, joining along the part line and i wont get any more resin running blow this area. Makes it easier to clean up.

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      At this point I do not have registering lips along the inside of the lower hull. These will come later. The vertical running tape marks where the vertical cut will be that
      will align with the screw fixture underneath.

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      As can be seen, light cloth has been laid up. I only need a thin layer as I will do most of the reinforcing from the inside. Don't sand more than you need to..
      Once this is secure you make a cut along the vertical tape line making sure that it coincides just in front of the hole for the screw fitting underneath.

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      Peel back the tape around the outside top and bottom and then sand back the join. In the meantime add more resin and cloth on the inside. Pull the tape off the aluminium bar around the screw hole.

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      Not the hole in the bottom should line up with the Aluminium bar and hole so that the screw can secure the whole bottom and top halves. The top is secured at the rear by a lip that runs underneath the underside of the top stern section, just in front of the rudders. Next I will be laying up some resin and weave in a sheet to create the registering lips that run down the sides of the the lower hull and allow the top hull to spring onto the lower hull


      Next time..

      David H


      Comment


      • What an amazing piece of craftsmanship!

        Comment


        • Hello all,

          Thank you Robbert,

          Usually I do my write ups on Friday afternoon after work and am pretty consistent doing so. However I have finished 667 and this write up is several weeks behind so I thought that being Christmas holidays and all I would accelerate the write up and get this thread to the point where she is in the water. I already have finished pics on my website and am almost ready to take orders.

          So after lots of sanding of the front end and smoothing back , filler then lots of sanding back the front end looks pretty good. I have had to re-scribe some lines that were taken out with the laying up of resin and sanding back, but not a lot in the overall scheme of things.


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          I mentioned last week that I would look at how I did the register lips along the side of the hull, however I realized after looking over the pictures that that came after the work on the twin shaft arrangement at the back. So I will discuss how these prop shafts have been set up.

          Weeks earlier I ordered two sets of shafts from Cornwall model boats over the in the UK. These two thin 200 mm long shafts 4 mm with outer tube of 6 mm dia. They arrived with plenty of time for me to install. Beautifully made smooth stainless steel shafts that will do nicely. I also ordered the required couplings and brass inserts to hook up to the motor shaft outputs from the twin cylinder.
          One of the lessons learnt from the PAPA is to make sure that there is some buoyancy foam as far back in the boat as possible. So I will be packing some foam in around the shafts and then pushrod pivots. Its going to get crowded but should certainly help achieve a nice surface trim when the boat hits the water, eager to avoid having the rear end sit too low.

          I started by shaping some blocks of foam with a hole in them to take the shafts right through realizing that the space in the twin booms was fair game for some flotation foam. Shaped it up pushed shafts through and glued down. This also has the added advantage of being a vibration dampener of sorts.

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          The next work to do was to mount the front end of the shafts to align up exactly with the motor outputs. The motor shaft and shafts would be connected via your standard red couplings, They only have one pivot. I haven't used the two joint dog leg style so you have to make sure that there is only one change in direction relative to the center axis. If you have more than one you will have binding and friction.

          I did this by cutting out some fiberglass brackets that after having a hole drilled in them big enough to accommodate the shafts. I then slid the brackets over the shafts, then coupled them up to the motor outputs and marked where the brackets aligned up with the side of the hull. This is the best way to ensure that the shafts are as aligned as possible. Once the position has located super glue was used to initially secure the position of the brackets and then I applied resin and glass.

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          I reinforced the brackets with a triangular gusset to give it some extra strength. After the rear shaft supports were installed and the shafts pretty much in place, I started work on the registering lip. To do this I created curved fiberglass strip. I took a piece of 90 mm PVC pipe that had been cut in half length wise. I then poured in some gel coat with grey pigment along the inside and let it set. After a couple of hours I came back and laid up a couple of layers of 8 oz weave and let that set. Then a simply lifted the hardened glass sheet off the PVC pipe. Hey presto, a curved sheet of fiberglass sheet that can be used as register lip.

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          This picture shows the curved fibre glass sheet with marker lines showing the strip to be cut to make up the register lip.
          Two of these will be made, one either side.

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          Once the strips have been cut I roughed up half of each strip lengthwise to key in with the fibre glass resin and mate really well to the inside of the lower hull. I took the dremel tool and used the grinder to rough just below the edge along the length of the hull. Then once this is done placed some masking tape along the upper outer rim of the hull to make sure that no mixed up resin works up the side and over the outer edge of the hull. I mixed up some resin and applied to the outside of the strip and inside of the top rim of the hull. then pressed the lip inside the hull and pegged off with clothes pegs for a couple of hours, wiping away excess..

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          Any ideas, suggestions, comments, welcome..

          David H



          Comment


          • Hello all,

            Once I have glued in the register lips around the insides of the lower hull I get a small flat file and run it along the rim that has been created, filing off any excess resin that will push the top hull out of the recess created by the lip. I also go over it with a bit of sandpaper.

            The most labour intensive part of any submarine is the rear end. There is so much going on in what can be such a small space. It is even more tricky when it is a single screw modern type with all the control surfaces all going through the same small area. I am fortunate in this in that a twin screw boat gives you a little more breathing space. Also the Soviet thing of having the axis line for the horizontal planes slightly above the shafts axis is pure genius. It means that I don't need a yoke for them, and as the vertical rudder passes through between the shafts I also don't need one for this either. Score!

            The horizontal planes are attached the to the cut off stern upper hull section. I can make this and assemble it all together then once all done and ready to go just glue in place. Yay!

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            As can be seen a little more filling has been needed around parts of the stern has there have been a few little pockets that need filling in. The stern planes integrate well however will still need a little further work on the plane fillet roots where they butt up against the hull. One of the things that I do is an old Merriman trick with wrapping some wet 'n' dry around the curve of the front of the movable plane, assembling the plane unit and wiggling it back and forth to grind a smooth curve that will allow these surfaces to move really lightly and not bind.


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            The project 667 has 'fences' along the sides of the movable planes. I don't know of any other Soviet boats that have this, (maybe the Yankee class.) I have found that will the casting process on the moulds for these that I have had to add an extra venting flue along one point in the fence of one of the parts and air bubbles have been trapped and I have needed to use filler. One little spot each time. After a small amount of sanding the parts move freely. I just don't know how effective they will be as these planes are tiny compared to the overall size of the boat.


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            Once everything lines up with the the planes I ground down the ends of the brass shafts to make them fit a little better inside the planes. This will also help the superglue key into the shaft when I am gluing the planes to the shaft. I drill a small hole along the front edge of the plane that goes through to the shaft hole for the rod. This is used to superglue the planes to the rod and are drilled at and angle that means most of the time the hole is hidden inside the curve of the fixed plane.


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            You can see the hole drilled along the front of the movable plane. Only revealed when the plane is angled a fair bit. It will be hidden during most operation. Once the parts fit and are aligned I then solder an brass horn that I made for the plastic control rod clevices that I use. I won't glue the planes in place until I have put down a primer coat on the stern upper hull and even given the base black coat.


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            These pics show how the rear will generally look when completed. I wont actually glue the top rear hull down until I've painted it first. The reason for this is that I
            intend to do a pattern that shows a subtle anechoic tile look. Subtle but noticeable. It will be easier to do this paint job before gluing the whole thing down. The Top rudder will
            also have its own paint job before being fixed down. I then applied filler into the gaps between the planes and the roots. then lots of sanding, sanding, sanding.

            I then need to look at doing the rudders. This is a little more complex as the rudder has to fit over both the top and bottom hull. It is not confined to just one. A lot of the alignment comes down to how well the top and bottom align. This will easily throw out a dead vertical rudder shaft. I had to spend time with protractors and marker pens marking notches that need to align up with each other.

            A primer coat is applied to the upper stern section. Note that the planes haven't been attached, this will happen after the black base coat is applied.


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            The movable planes are taped off and given their colours top and bottom before assembly. Red anti-foul on the bottom and black base coat on the top. The crazed effect is unintended but looks cool.


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            Now the base black coat is on I can angle the planes so they are both aligned exactly with the hole on each exposed and the brass horn in the corresponding position that it needs to be in and superglue the planes. 10 minutes later I check the movement and that they both move in synchronous with each other. The holes beneath the brass horn on the underside of the hull top are the holes for the rudder pivot and also the register point on the fixed vertical fin.

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            Tape is used to keep the filler in a narrow corridor. It is also used to keep the planes exactly aligned with each other when gluing.
            Anyway enough for now, I can smell the bushfires 100 kms away.

            David H








            Comment


            • Hello all,


              Christmas Day and Boxing Day over.

              I got given a copy of the DVD "Kursk" for Christmas. The back Cover explanation of the film is lame. It describes the Kursk as a "Kursky Submarine". Seriously HOW HARD IS IT TO CALL IT AN OSCAR!!!.
              Why can't they get it right? HWSNBN style rant over...

              Anyway back to the build. I also taped off and prayed the underside of the rear fixed planes with the anti-foul red. Also shown in some of the buoyancy foam that I've squeezed into the very back end of the boat. As mentioned previously I also had to at this point spend a fair amount of time making sure that the rudder assembly both top and bottom would fit and align up correctly.

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              Here I check that the brass vertical rod is vertical in all axis. Protractors and marked points and lots of eyeballing to get this one right. The horn used on this brass rod is just the same as that used on the horizontal planes. It is just a thin brass rectangle with two holes drilled. One for the brass rod and the other for a Clevice. I tend to use the plastic ones. The vertical rudders haven had the primer grey yet.

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ID:	135641 I will be squaring the round drilled vent holes bit later on. There will also be some filler added in order to get the surfaces absolutely smooth and right. The edges between the shaft booms will also be sanded level and straight.

              After giving the stern top section of coat of black base I started the process of cutting up and laying the strip of masking tape across the top of the part. This is a long and tedious prpocess but I am really happy with the result. It is designed to simulate the Anechoic tiles and although the joint lines are probably bigger than they should be and the consistency across the tiles is not great, it tends to give a beautifully subtle yet slightly noticeable look to the surface.

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              Here the sail has already been given the treatment with the taped lines. I have also done the same with one of the sail mounted planes. Once these are all done I give them a spray of a very dark grey, that is just noticeable above the black base coat. Here you notice that the tape has been sprayed over on the planes. I carefully peel back a tiny amount of the tape just to see how the result looks. I only need a couple of minutes for the paint to dry and the tape to be fully peeled off. You can make out the pattern on the sail that has already had its tape removed.

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              Tape being peeled off. You can see where tape was over tape.

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              Here the top stern section has been placed over the lower hull. You can see the Anechoic tile pattern that I was aiming for. I am really happy with it. Subtle but noticeable. It is actually more noticeable in the water strangely enough. The rudder is just placed on top , its not glued in. Once again getting alignment just right.

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              I haven't even touched the props yet. They will be sanded back and given a nice bronze theme..

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              The sail has been given the same Anechoic tile business and with the planes is ready to be assembled as one unit. However I will probable glue the planes on as the last thing I do. I have never had working fore-planes on any of my models. In the mike kit, I have included fore-planes which are extendable for anyone who wants to utilize them, however on my boat I haven't even included them. Mike just gets around on its rear planes.

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              I make all my sails so they are detachable. This hasn't before as the sail would sit cleanly on the hull, however with the 667 the rear of the sail angles up and along the top of the missile deck. This transition is quite noticeably filled with a distinct curve. I would then by using filler pretty much glue down the sail and render it distinctly non-detachable. I will however give it the stainless steel bolt treatment I give all my other boats anyway and come to a decision later....

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              Anyway, enough for now. I hope you all had a Good Christmas. It was hot enough to have a swim here...

              David H






              ​​​​

              Comment


              • Hello all,

                So now that the rudders have been aligned with the rear upper hull assembly is was time to glue down the top to bottom. However before the final close out I once again created a brass horn for the clevice that attaches to the pushrod for the rudder. Once this was in place and aligned up the closeout with the top and bottom could be done. Before hand I also squeezed in some more foam at the back, making sure that It would not get in the way of the movement and travel of all the pushrods and horns and all.

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                In this pick below you can see how I glued the two halves together. It turns out that using the weight of a clamp across the back of the boat did the job nicely. All checks for square done, then left for the resin to cure.

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                After an hour or so, pretty quick at is is a nice balmy 30 degrees here, the two halves were set and I could go about sanding and filling the imperfections. This would mean that some of the spray patter would be lost lower down where the top hull meets the lower, I would simply go back over this by applying further tape to a small area, masking off the rest and going through the same procedure as before.
                However I really wanted the two halves to be able to "close out" and attach so I started on making the lip that would fit on the underside back edge of the forward top hull and would slip under just forward of the upper rudder to secure the two hulls. Ultimately the securing would be done by the single bolt up the front.

                The lip was created by taking the top silicon mould and simply laying up a small area of gelcoat and resin in an area that was just forward of the rudder. I then peeled this off the mould and had a small copy of this back section are of the top hull. I then cut this to a rectangular pattern and roughly followed the contours of the back edge and sanded it smooth. I then ground out the detail such as the escape hatch, ground along the underside of the forward hull to give it a good surface to grip to and and glued it underneath the underside rear edge of the forward hull section. Taping off just forward to avoid splatter and excess resin squishing up and forward along the deck.

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                Once this was done I lightly ground out the underside of the rear upper section just in front of the Rudders to give an smooth slide underneath the rear section. Then sanding smooth the lip to make sure that it fit well. Once this was done I followed the HWSNBN's method of closing out the back section and giving it a smooth fine part line. This involved putting masking tape over the top edges of both surfaces where the meet each other. Then rubbing some vaseline or in my case lanolin along the underside of the rear section and pasting some filler on top of the lip, fitting the whole hull together and pressing the lip up underneath the rear edge. Excess filler squished out and is wiped away. Then left to harden.

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                Once this edge was down it was fine sanding down and smoothing, being careful not to take material of from the lip even though it looks rough it means a really precise part line, or at least tha'ts the idea.
                Eventually working my way down to wet and dry then a shot of black base.

                Once this section was down I could them cover the whole top hull with tape strips, just like what had been done to the rear end and the sail .This was the biggest part to get the treatment and would involve me sitting down around the dinner table and vaguely watching something on TV whilst cutting strip after strip and laying them down vertically and horizontally. This takes hour and hours. I did it over three nights of crap TV.

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                Once this was complete the dark grey could be sprayed over.

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                Here the entire top hull has been sprayed with the dark grey spray. All that has to be done now it to peel off the thing strips of masking tape to reveal the pattern of the dark grid making up the
                profile of the tiles.


                David H

                Comment


                • Impressive. Only a quote: According to their blades, I think you have propellers changed of side

                  Comment


                  • Hello all,

                    Yes Reddevil. I do need to swap out the propellers.

                    I do hope everyone had a good new years eve. I spent the evening watching a Bushfire that came within 2 kms of our house. Car packed up with stuff to evacuate. Fortunately the southerly change blew it back on itself. Phew!

                    So after I sprayed the whole top hull and peeled back the masking tape strips revealing the anechoic tile pattern, I marked out the position of the waterline that on Soviet and Russian subs is marked with a distinctive white line that wraps it's way around the hull. This required placing the hull on my marking board and attaching a pencil to a block and moving it around to get a level line all the way around. Then using masking tape above and below the line with newspaper covering further for the spray. Then I mix up a slightly off white in my little spray gun and go around the hull. I am pretty happy with the results.

                    I stopped short of doing the line around the stern section, awaiting until I had got the vertical rudders on and done the anechoic patterns for that.

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                    You can only just make out the patterns on the hull if you look closely. In the water it is actually amplified. Here I have marked off the joint area between the Rudder and the stern section.

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                    In the meantime I needed to further prepare the lower hull. The Anti-foul red would need to be re-sprayed after I put down an initial coat. Now was the time to apply all the scoops and outlets. The 667 have at least four of each, so eight. In order to get these down I sanded the outline fillets that they would be attached to and then glued them down by applying filler to the base. The small dowel like protrusion giving a lot of the anchoring effect needed. The filler would then upon pressure, squish out the sides and be wiped up and around the edges creating a transitioning fillet.

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                    As can be seen there is still an need for further sanding so, yes the initial anti-foul probably was premature. This gets sanded back with wet and dry. Its a bit tricky to get under the front of the forward scoops to sand away the excess.

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                    I have a confession, I haven't cut out all the drainage slots even though they are all marked out in the mould. It's a bad habit over lots of models. You can clearly see the forward facing scoops and the rearward facing outlets. I have had a really hard time getting close up photo's of either of these parts.

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                    The gloss look disappears as the paint dries. The next step is to apply the weathering under the waterline. I have looked at lots of photo's of these boats out of the water. I could have just dispensed with the anti-foul red and just painted her underside with a beige /tan colour as these boats after years in the Atlantic look like that. I have seen photo's that show what looks like coral reef growing all over the thing. You can just make out where the propeller are.

                    I decided to give a scum line that it not too strong. Designed to simulate the boat after being in the water from, I'm guessing 6 months to a year or so? I don't actually know the rate of Algae and barnacle growth in the Barents, North sea and Atlantic. So I taped off the white waterline mark from above and attached the two hull halves together.

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                    I decided to use two shades of tan, a slightly darker one that I would spray on around the waterline and then fade off with a lighter one from lower down. As I worked down the hull I would spray further out so that the spray would cover a wider area.

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                    I completed the white waterline as it wraps around the stern section and around the back of the rudder. This took a little time to get nice and straight. I then had to mask off above the waterline here to and make sure that the newspaper was covering everything above before spraying.

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                    After the scum line weathering was done I then applied the white lines around the top of the hull. At this point I could also paint and attach the masts.
                    I like how this boat is coming along..

                    Next stop ballast tanks and cylinders. Then water and I will finally close this thread after a year and a half!


                    David h


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                    • The boat looks nice on that table. The two tone scum line is a nice touch.
                      If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

                      Comment


                      • Hello all,

                        The Ballast tank system that I have been using of late is what has been called the "Sheerline system". It is the 12v car wind screen washer pump forcing water into a sealed pvc pipe tank, using the simply but effective servo pinch on a nitro tube. It is a system that is slow to dive and surface, but very reliable. I like the fact that you expend the energy to dive and surfacing is just the release of the built up energy. The pressurized air inside the tank pushes the water out to surface.

                        I build my tanks of PVC pipe and it is forward of the cylinder. If there is a leak or other problem with the tank it will not affect the cylinder. I have cut a 70mm PVC pipe and found two thick 70mm end caps. I then took a flat section of PVC sheet from a down pipe funnel and cut a semi-circular slosh baffle out of it to fit in the middle of the tank. I drilled a hole in one end cap in a corner that would act as the outlet for the
                        Silicon pipe coming from the cylinder. I took a length of nylon plastic pipe to use as the internal pipe leading to the pickup at the bottom of the tank. This was bent at about a 45 degree angle and just touches the bottom of the inside of the tank near the middle next to the baffle.

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                        All this has been glued in using green Plumbers pressure glue. This stuff is designed to seal PVC pipe under pressure. The internal plastic pipe connects to a 4mm barbed off take.This is glued and allow the silicon pipe from the cylinder to connect. I then cut out some strip of PVC and bent it to make two brackets that are glued to the ends of the tank. In the flat section I drilled a 4mm hole to take a stainless steel bolt.


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                        I then cut some strip fibre glass sheet and glued it to the sides with some resin and cloth. Once glued down I drilled a hole in the middle and then bolted down the tank.

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                        It has taken a bit of time to make dozens of fine little adjustments to aligning the shafts to the outputs from the cylinder. Aligning up the magnetic couplings for the pushrods is also something that
                        has taken a bit of time. I placed lead in positions that are similar to their corresponding locations on Borei (Project 955). As these two boats are about the same size the positioning of the lead should equate to
                        similar trim.


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                        Maiden voyage details later...


                        David H
                        Last edited by Davidh; 01-05-2020, 04:47 AM.

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                        • That is beautiful David.

                          Peter

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                          • A long time coming, but a beautiful result. Ballasting looks bang on! Great job, David.

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                            • David,

                              I know how much work there is envolved in building your sub from scratch, so hats off to you!!, she ended up very nice, at one of the pics she looks like a humpback whale, typical russian style.

                              Manfred
                              Fertig zum unterwasser.

                              Comment


                              • Agree with all the previous comments. That sub looks great in the water!
                                If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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