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3d Disney nautilus

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  • #16
    Originally posted by RCSubGuy View Post

    Nope.. just too big to worry about a few digital copies of 3D files. It would cost more for one of their lawyers to glance at a screen than they'd get out of a lawsuit or effort to shut anyone down.
    Good for us.
    Of the 40,000 men who served on German submarines, 30,000 never returned.”

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by RCSubGuy View Post
      Looking great! Good job.
      Thank you Bob.

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      • #18
        Salon and Steering House windows installed. Lights and motor hooked up. Still some final weathering.

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        • #19
          Amazing work! I'm tempted to try this file rather than the files I got off Thingiverse. Can you print this in sections, rather than the many parts they show in the CGTrader files?

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          • #20
            Got the Port side Salon window done. Some weathering at the deck drains. I am calling her done ! CPT Nemo looking out to his wonderful under sea world !

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Seaview1 View Post
              Amazing work! I'm tempted to try this file rather than the files I got off Thingiverse. Can you print this in sections, rather than the many parts they show in the CGTrader files?
              Yes, I am currently doing this one. Have a thread in 3d printing.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by SubICman View Post

                Yes, I am currently doing this one. Have a thread in 3d printing.
                Yes you can. Either whole hull sections or the whole sections separated into 4. Unfortunately, there are no 'instructions" Make sure read the comments from the provider and look at the PDF that shows the components in each ZIP file. And the names are in German. You'll figure it out. Good luck !

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                • #23
                  Great project! I just found your post and am really impressed. What make/model printer did you use? I am intrigued with the interior details provided by the designer.

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                  • #24
                    For the detailed parts in this model, (and there are many) a resin printer is highly recommended.

                    FDM printers have their pluses, but can't get near the accuracy resin printers can provide @ 30-50 micron resolution.

                    CC

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                    • #25
                      I was afraid you were going to say that. What make and model of resin printer did you use? Did you print the larger hull pieces on the FDM printer? I particularly interested in the interior details so any help would be greatly appreciated.

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                      • #26
                        I went from a couple of Raise3D Pro2s and Pro2+'s which are really good FDM printers. As nice as they were, resin could pull pretty much any detail out I would ever need. @ 1/72 and beyond, models really stand out, but resin printing is a completely different animal and there is a definite learning curve. Once you get your printer mechanically dialed-in, (very easy since there's only one axis to deal with) getting the model oriented properly and supported in such a way that you can maintain close tolerances for wide, thin parts, (like hulls) takes experience. Clean-up is more involved, but not bad if you have an organized workspace.

                        I use a Phrozen Sonic Mighty 4K. The next big step up is their Mega 8k, which can print football helmet-sized parts. I'll move up to that eventually and print longer, single hull sections, rather than splitting them up.

                        Resin printers are not fast, but the wait is worth it when you hold the results. An FDM print that might take 9 hours could double using resin.

                        Typically, I prototype in standard, Aqua 4k Grey. I've been using Phrozen's ABS-like resin, and I'm not a convert after going through one bottle this week. A super-strong, heat-resistant hull will likely require their very expensive resin, which could run $400-500 for a 4' hull.

                        CC

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                        • #27
                          Thanks again for the additional information. I have to be honest that my consideration of a resin printer would be for the printing of any detailed interior pieces such as those outlined in the design files on CGTrader. I have a much larger Nautilus, 7 feet long and therefore upscaling some of the larger exterior pieces would be difficult to print especially given the fact that my experience lies solely with FDM printers and purchasing a resin printer with a larger build plate would be prohibitively expensive. The other issue that I am facing has nothing to do with printers but with access. Once again, detailing the wheelhouse interior is not so bad but the two halves of my boat's hull have already been sealed making interior access really tough. Still, I can't thank you enough for sharing the source of these STL files as well as the obvious success of your particular project. At some point, I have to figure out how I can incorporate some of the really cool features of the aforementioned details into my Nautilus. To be continued...

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                          • #28
                            For joining larger printed resin parts, (like hull section seams) after bonding the inner seating surfaces, I apply resin with a jeweler's oiler to the exterior seam and cure manually for a few seconds. With a slow build-up, sanding is quick and easy, with no trace of the joint. My go-to tool for curing seams, the inside of hollowed-out prints, or nooks and crannies under a boat's superstructure is a Phrozen Beam; it gets more use than I anticipated.

                            Phrozen Cure Beam : Post Curing UV Pen Phrozen Technology|Desktop LCD 3D Printer|8K High Resolution (phrozen3d.com)​

                            For patching larger areas, Phrozen just came out with this: Phrozen Light Curing Putty Phrozen Technology|Desktop LCD 3D Printer|8K High Resolution (phrozen3d.com)​

                            The company offers a lot of Flash Sales that I take advantage of. Shipping is rediculous for their products and the sales often go through Amazon with no shipping charges. Any big Amazon sales days are good opportunities to score a printer at a healthy discount. I think I bought my printer for 40% off which included a free bottle of resin.

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                            • #29
                              Great advice on the cure beam. Your posts have led me to seriously think about purchasing a resin 3D printer for large detailed prints. I have narrowed down my choices between an Anycubic Photon M3 Max and an Elegoo Jupiter 6k. Does anyone have experience with either of these two models? Please lmk.

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                              • #30
                                Okay, just found the Phrozen Sonic Mighty 8K printer. This one has a huge print space and is very cheap. What am I missing? I did not mean to change the direction of your thread but instead I wanted to take advantage of your experience with this project but also with resin printers. Thank you for your tolerance.

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