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1/120 Akula

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  • #46
    I am impressed in your approach in your methods adding a new prospective to our hobby. Could you show in more detail the parts you used for your shaft and pushrod seals.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by vital.spark View Post
      I am impressed in your approach in your methods adding a new prospective to our hobby. Could you show in more detail the parts you used for your shaft and pushrod seals.
      These seals has been around in this hobby for quite sometime actually, and also being sold in many hobby online sites as well. I got mine here:

      https://m.aliexpress.com/i/325680164...site4itemAdapt
      The rod seals were M6 glands, and shaft seal is M8 gland.

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      • #48
        Any pool test yet? Want to see how the gyro works.
        Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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        • #49
          Actually, seals aren't a problem for me here in Hong Kong as several seal suppliers are minutes from my house. I'm interested in the metal parts that screw into the cylinder and hold the seals. Are these used in the pneumatics industry?

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          • #50
            They're used to seal cables coming in and out of outdoor junction boxes. The more you screw the cap down the more it compresses the seal. Click image for larger version

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            Click image for larger version

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            Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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            • #51
              Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
              Any pool test yet? Want to see how the gyro works.
              Yet to maiden voyage. Even so, I don't really think we can see clearly the gyro in action.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by vital.spark View Post
                Actually, seals aren't a problem for me here in Hong Kong as several seal suppliers are minutes from my house. I'm interested in the metal parts that screw into the cylinder and hold the seals. Are these used in the pneumatics industry?
                Hi, some exploded view of the M8 cable gland.

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                And to install them onto your WTC, you need at least to drill a blind hole, or drill and tap a hole for the end thread size. There will be a small oring for sealing. The M6 glands however does not have additional nut supplied, thus you must drill and tap M6 threads in order to fit.

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                • #53
                  Correct me if I'm wrong but I think R and R Model Engineering uses the same seal on their 80 and 70mm WTC.
                  Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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                  • #54
                    Same concept used but with an o ring as its seals instead which is equally good.

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                    • #55
                      Thanks MLOO for the information.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by mloo123 View Post
                        Same concept used but with an o ring as its seals instead which is equally good.
                        Aren't O-ring better than a cylindrical shaped seal as there's less surface area in contact with the moving shaft ( drive and control) therefore less friction/ binding.
                        Last edited by redboat219; 05-04-2022, 12:21 AM.
                        Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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                        • #57
                          Normally when you turned the gland nut, the seal will be compressed near the nut openings more as they usually not in100% linear motion. Or sometimes when compressed, the middle portion of the seal will collapse first, depending on the design on the nut and body.

                          For this case as the internal shape of the nut isn't flat but tapered, thus the seal frontal end surface will be compressed in more than the rear end. It's the same as those conventional non IP67 rated cable glands (as per your pic) but have more bite to it.

                          Friction is unavoidable in both scenarios... The more you compressed for more sealing, frictions will still occur. Best option is still with the used of stuffing box with shaft bushings and grease inside, if there's no space constrains...

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by mloo123 View Post
                            Normally when you turned the gland nut, the seal will be compressed near the nut openings more as they usually not in100% linear motion. Or sometimes when compressed, the middle portion of the seal will collapse first, depending on the design on the nut and body.

                            For this case as the internal shape of the nut isn't flat but tapered, thus the seal frontal end surface will be compressed in more than the rear end. It's the same as those conventional non IP67 rated cable glands (as per your pic) but have more bite to it.

                            Friction is unavoidable in both scenarios... The more you compressed for more sealing, frictions will still occur. Best option is still with the used of stuffing box with shaft bushings and grease inside, if there's no space constrains...
                            Oh. Wasn't aware the seal has a tapered inside.
                            Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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                            • #59
                              To the paint shop today. Using Tamiya Hull Red and Flat Black.

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                              Painting masts...

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                              Secondly, I probably have addressed the main engine compartment leaks problem. As expected, the gland nut moved anitclockwise when the drive shaft is turning in same direction. Will apply some locktite and hoped no more leaking occurs doing further tests.
                              Last edited by mloo123; 05-07-2022, 10:00 AM.

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                              • #60
                                Ballast weights...

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                                Hooking up altogether...

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